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I am a disabled widow. I have not worked outside my home in many years. Can I get Social Security for disability?

By   /  March 3, 2016  /  70 Comments

Learn how widows, widowers, and divorced surviving spouses age fifty or older may get Social Security for disability from their spouse’s work record.

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Watch the Video: “I am a disabled widow. I have not worked outside my home in many years. Can I get Social Security for disability?”

Benefits for Disabled Widows

Social Security survivor benefits include benefits for widows and widowers who are age sixty and over, whether or not they are disabled. Additionally, Social Security benefits for disability are available to qualifying disabled widows and widowers as early as age fifty. The older you are when you become disabled, the higher your benefit will be. For information about Social Security’s definition of disability, please see our article “What Is Disability According to Social Security Disability Law?”

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible for widows or widowers benefits, your deceased spouse must have worked enough in Social Security-taxed jobs to insure his or her family for survivor benefits. The Social Security Administration can tell you whether he or she had enough work credits. Another non-disability requirement is that, usually you are not eligible for disabled widow or widower’s benefits if you remarried before age fifty and are still married when you become disabled. Typically, you must also become disabled within seven years of the death of your spouse or within seven years of the end of your prior entitlement, if any, on your spouse’s earnings record.

Disability for Medicare Only

Medicare health insurance begins after you have received twenty-four months of disabled widow’s or widower’s benefits. If you are age sixty or older and you became disabled before age sixty, you can apply for disabled widow’s or widower’s benefits just for the purpose of obtaining Medicare coverage earlier than age sixty-five. Being found disabled for Medicare purposes will not increase your widow’s benefit based on age, but it will provide medical insurance coverage. For more information about Medicare, see our article  “If I Am Approved for Social Security Disability, Will I Get Medicare and Medicaid Health Insurance?”

Disabled Surviving Divorced Spouses

Disabled surviving divorced spouses who were married to a deceased insured worker for more than ten years are eligible under the same rules as widows and widowers. Social Security for disability can be paid to a disabled widow or widower and to a disabled surviving divorced spouse simultaneously without reducing the amount of each other’s benefits.

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70 Comments

  1. Rene Cavazos says:

    Dear Kay,
    My husband of 30 years died in aug of 2011, at age 63, after an illness of almost 20 years. He started recieving ssdi benefits in 1994. I did not work enough to get very much on my own record, as I was his caregiver. He was recieving 963.00 per month and the state paid his medicare premium. I currently recieve a VA widows pension on his record. Was he recieving 100% of his ss benefit ? If not, what percentage was he getting? Would my benefit be calculated on this amount? I am unable to work, but I dont want to lose the benefit I currently have if the ssd benefit would be lower. I am 55.
    Thank you, Rene

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rene,

      If you are under full retirement age, you can apply for Social Security reduced widow’s benefits, which means the amount will be less than what your husband was drawing. The amount of the reduction depends on your age when you become entitled. If you are full retirement age, you will receive the same as benefit your husband received plus any cost-of-living adjustments since then.

      I suggest that you contact the VA to find out what effect receiving Social Security would have on your VA widows pension. That will help you decide what is the most advantageous course of action.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  2. Alan Moll says:

    My wife, age 53, receives Social Security disability payments. I am 62. If I were to die, I understand that she will also be eligible for reduced Survivors benefits. How do I calculate how much those additional benefits would be? Thank you for your time.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Alan,

      First, let me mention that if you were to die before your wife, she would have the choice of supplementing her disability benefits with reduced survivor benefits or leave the survivor benefits until she was older, even to full retirement age, to get a higher survivor benefit later. If she were to take reduced widow’s benefits now, she would receive only the difference between the widow’s benefit and her current benefit. For example, if her current benefit were $900 and the reduced widow’s were $1,100, she would receive $200 in widow’s benefits.

      Her benefit before offset for her own disability benefit would be a fraction of your Primary Insurance Amount (PIA), which is your retirement benefit at full retirement age. If you are receiving benefits, you can get your PIA by calling Social Security at 1-800-772-1213. If you are not receiving benefits, get the estimated PIA by setting up a My Social Security account on http://www.ssa.gov. Then request an earnings statement (not a benefit statement). The earnings statement will give you an estimated PIA. You can then use the chart in https://secure.ssa.gov/apps10/poms.nsf/lnx/0300615301 to find the fraction that would be used to calculate her potential benefit. (Choose the correct fraction based on her year of birth and multiple your PIA by the fraction to get an estimate of her benefit.) The rules for widows and widowers benefits are extensive and complex, but this will give you a rough idea.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  3. Jodie says:

    My divorced spouse died at age 39 I received survivors benefits for my children and also myself. We were married over 10 yrs. I became disabled at 46 less than 7 yrs of receiving survivors benefits. How much and when such I file for divorced benefits again??? I receive ssi now

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jodie,

      You can apply for reduced disabled divorced spouse’s benefits when you turn fifty if you have not remarried by then.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  4. Sue Matuszak says:

    My husband passed away at 40, I was 38. Five years later, I became disabled. After several years and many medications, I was able to return to work on a very limited basis. I remarried in 2007. According to Social Security, as of 1/1/17, I will have enough work credits to file for SSDI. The question that I have is that since my benefit payments would be low, would I be able to collect from my late-husband’s retirement. Thank you in advance for your help on this issue.
    Sincerely,
    Sue

    • Sue Matuszak says:

      I forgot to mention that my late-husband and I were married for 15 years.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sue,

      To be eligible on your first husband’s earnings record you have to have have remarried after you attained sixty years of age. Otherwise your marriage disqualifies you.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  5. Chris says:

    Hello Kay, my Father’s wife recently passed away at age 49, she was receiving disability and has for some time, my Father is also receiving disability benefits. He is 54 years old and is mentally handicapped so his situation will not change. Is he eligible to receive widower benefits in the form of her ssdi payments or a portion of them? Thank you for your time.

    Chris

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Chris,

      If your father’s current widower’s benefits are higher than his own disability benefits (SSDI), your father can receive a partial widower’s benefit. For example, if the widower’s benefit is $1,000 and his SSDI benefit is $800, he will receive $200 in widow’s benefits. Because widower’s benefits taken before full retirement age (age sixty-seven for your father) are reduced, your father also has the choice of not taking the survivor benefits now and switching to the full unreduced widower’s benefits at age sixty-seven.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  6. Tina says:

    Hi,

    My mother is 67, permanently disabled and receiving SSI. Her ex-husband just passed away, and we found out that she has widow’s benefits. Will she have to choose between SSI and the widow’s benefit, or will she be able to receive both?

    Thanks.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tina,

      She will be required to apply for an receive the surviving divorced wife’s benefit. If that benefit is $753 or more, her SSI will stop. If it is less, SSI will be reduced to bring the combined benefit amount to $753.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  7. Sandy says:

    Hello my name is sandy my husband died when he was 47 years old …2007 year.I was aprove for desabilhty last year I am 47 I want to know, can I get my widow pension went i turn. 50 years old thank you…

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sandy,

      To be eligible for Social Security disabled widow’s benefits at age fifty, you have to have become disabled with seven years of your husband’s death or within seven years of when you were last entitled on his record for having a child in your care. If you are not eligible based on disability, you can apply for reduced widow’s benefits based on age when you turn sixty and will be paid if the survivor benefits are higher than your current disability benefit on your own earnings record.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  8. Hope Faith says:

    I was receiving SSI until I turned 62 and began receiving SSDI and SSI. The SSDI is off of my ex hubands record. I was a stay at home wife and mother and I don’t have enough work credits for retirement. Will I be eligible for Medicare when I turn 65 ? If I am, will I also be eligible for Medicaid and Medicare if my situations doesn’t change ? Thank You.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Hope,

      Yes, you will be eligible for Medicare when you turn sixty-five. If your situation stays the same and the law doesn’t change, you will also be eligible for Medicaid. If so, the Medicaid program is likely to pay your Part B Medicare premium.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Hope Faith says:

        Thank You ! That is what I thought based on everything that I have read at the SSA website. I haven’t been able to get anyone to confirm it, until now.

        I do have another question, if you have time to answer it. I hope and pray this doesn’t happen, but if my ex dies will that have any effect on the amount of SSDI that I receive off of his record ? Currently, it is less than $753 a month, so I am also receiving SSI, as I stated earlier. Thank You.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Hope,

          A note of clarification, you cannot be receiving SSDI, which are benefits paid on your own earnings record, off your husband’s record; you are receiving Social Security divorced spouse’s benefits. Survivor benefits are paid at a higher rate that dependent benefits (75% reduced for taking a benefit before full retirement age versus 50% reduced for early retirement.)

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Hope Faith says:

            Thank you again, Kay. Yes, I am receiving Divorced Spouse Benefits off of my ex husbands record. I was a stay at home Mom and I became disabled shortly before we had planned for me to go back to work. so I didn’t have enough work credits for SSDI when I became disabled or enough for Retirement when I reach Full Retirement Age.

            You have been a Big Help. Thank You Again !

          • Kay Derochie says:

            You are welcome, Hope.

          • Hope Faith says:

            Kay, I do have another question, when you get a chance. Is the SSDI as a Divorced Spouse considered Early Retirement since it is reduced ?

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Hope,

            Spousal benefits received because you have a child under age sixteen in your care will not affect your retirement benefits or spousal benefits based on age. The amount paid is based on your ex-husband’s earnings record and are not reduced.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  9. Denise says:

    I’ve been diagnosed with ALS due to my husbands income I received SSI. 3 years ago he died unexpectedly and I now receive widows disability under his social security number. I didn’t work enough to receive on my own. My ex husband divorced me in 1993 we were married 15 years. Can I receive higher payments if I switch to to his earnings record. He is single because his wife passed away recently. Trying to find more income due to this tragic disease. I was diagnosed at 50.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Denise,

      I suggest that you double check with Social Security, but I don’t think you can draw benefits on two spouse’s or even just on the first ex-spouse because you remarried.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  10. sharon says:

    I am disabled and receiving SSI my husband passed away of cancer can I receive widow benefit I am 54

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sharon,

      If you are disabled as defined by Social Security law, you can receive reduced widow’s benefits because you are at least fifty years old. To receive on age alone, you have to be sixty. To receive full benefits you have to be full retirement age, which for you is age sixty-seven.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  11. Mary fernandez says:

    I’ve been a widow since the age of 16 years old,I had my child at 17years old the same day my husband past.recieved benefits.iam 61years old receive widows and ssi.my question is I was disabled at 57years old when I applied for ss which I was awarded ssi.later i applied for widows at 60.why couldn’t I receive widows benefits earlier if I was 57 and disabled? Does the 7year before or after apply? I just want to get a correct answer .thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mary,

      The rule you are referring to is that to claim disabled widow’s or widower’s benefits before age sixty a person must become disabled within the later of seven years after the insured worker’s death or seven years of last receiving young widow’s benefits for having a child of the worker under age sixteen in his or her care.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  12. Gwebdolyn evans says:

    Hi i have a question my husband passed july 11-2015 i am disable age 50 i receive disability i would like to know please is their any thing i qualify for i have sacoidosis, arthithis, fibromyaglia, hpertension can i receive back pay how long it take to process thanks for your help

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Gwebdolyn,

      The earliest that your disabled widow’s benefits can start is July 2015. It can take two to five months to get a medical decision and another couple months after that to get payment. Depending on your current income, you may qualify for food stamps or subsidized housing; however, usually there is a waiting list for housing. If you do not have medical insurance, you can apply for benefits under the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). More information is available at http://www.healthcare.gov.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  13. Sharon says:

    My husband passed away back in 2005. My children were 7 and 9 so I was receiving survivor benefits until this year 2015 when my son turned 18. I have since become disabled but while trying to get approved they are saying I have no work history. This is true because I was a stay home mom and worked just a little here and there. I could never hold a job for long. I am 48 and have been reading I can not use my husband’s work history for disability until I reach the age of 50. Is this true? Or not at all because I didn’t applied for disability within the 7 year rule I was also reading about. I didn’t because I was already receiving SS benefits and why would I have tried to apply for more. Did I mess this all up beyond repair? All I know is I have absolutely no money since my survivor benefits have stopped and I can not work. Can you please advise me. Thank you.

    • Sharon says:

      I need to clarify the second line. I have been disabled but recently applied for disability benefits. Sorry, thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sharon,

      You must be fifty years old to disabled widow’s benefits at a reduced rate. I believe the rule is that you must become disabled within seven years of the date of death of the wage earner or within seven years of your last entitlement to benefits. If you received benefits for yourself as a young mother with children in your care up until your youngest turned age sixteen, then the seven years would start when those benefits stopped. If you did not receive benefits for yourself, but only as payee for your children, then you were not entitled on the record. If you are in doubt about your eligibility, when you turn fifty, file the application.

      In the meantime, if you have limited income and limited countable assets, you might be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability, which is also administered by the Social Security Administration. You can get some general information about SSI in the articles under the SSI tab on this website’s top navigation bar.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      S

  14. Darlene says:

    I am 55 years old and disabled. I am a widow. When am I eligible for full widows benefits.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Darlene,

      The reduction in widow’s benefits for taking the benefit before full retirement age is permanent. However, if you are also insured for Social Security Retirement on your own earnings record and the benefit is higher than your reduced widow’s benefits, you can switch over to your retirement benefit when you reach full retirement age.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  15. JJ says:

    im a disabled widow. I’m also American Indian heritage.. Can I get the benefits from American Indian tribe to increase the money I receive now?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear JJ,

      You need to contact the American Indian Tribe of which you are a member to see if you qualify for benefits. If you do, the benefits would not affect your Social Security disabled widow’s benefits. If your Social Security is less than $753, you might qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. You can apply for SSI at any Social Security office.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  16. Wanda says:

    I am 65 years old. my husband passed away 12 years ago, since I was at the age of 60, I have been receiving widows SSI Benefits. I have had a lot of problems with working where I am now, because of arthritis. At my age it has been hard for me to perform my duties well. I’m a sales associate for a retail store. Walking on concrete, constant pain in feet, knees and lower back. I have bills to pay and SSI benefits I’m receiving now isn’t enough to live on. Would I be eligible for disability?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Wanda,

      I do not have enough information to know whether your medical condition is severe enough for you to qualify for benefits. I can provide some information about various benefit possibilities.

      You are not eligible for Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits once you reach full retirement, which for you would be age sixty-six. Also, the first five full-calendar months of disability are not paid. Therefore, if you are within five months of age sixty-six, disability benefits would not be payable.

      If you have not done so, I suggest that you check with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to see whether your work earnings while you have been drawing Social Security (not SSI) widow’s benefits have increased enough that you could draw more on your own work record than your widow’s benefits. If so, you could switch to retirement benefits on your own earnings record. Another possibility, is that if your widow’s benefits are less than $753 and you stop work, you might qualify for a small amount of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to supplement widow’s benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  17. lostnsavd says:

    I have been receiving social security disability for many years. My husband recently passed away from ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease. He was only receiving SSI. I am 63 years old. Can I get an increase on my disability income now that I am a widow?

    Also, I was told that because of a previous marriage of 14 years that I would be entitled to his benefits. Is that true?

    lostnsavd…

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lostnsavd,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) does not provide any survivor benefits, so you will not receive any benefits from your second husband.

      You may apply for divorced wife’s benefits or surviving divorced wife’s benefits on your first husband’s earnings record if he is either receiving benefits or is deceased and the benefits would be higher than your own disability benefits. If you take dependent or survivor benefits at your current age, the benefits will be reduced. Full benefits would be payable when you reach full retirement age of sixty-six.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  18. GAIL PORTER says:

    I have been on disability for several years. My husband has been on social security for several years. Based on his age, we have always assumed that he will pass away before me and that I will be over 65.

    Will I be able to continue drawing my disability and draw survivor’s benefits upon his passing?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Gail,

      When you reach full retirement age (age sixty-six to sixty-seven, depending on the year you were born), your disability benefits will be changed to retirement benefits. If your husband dies before you and a widow’s benefit on his account is higher than yours, you can apply to receive the widows benefit instead (not in addition to) your retirement.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  19. Cleide Pugliese says:

    Im a 48 years old widower and disable.
    I became disable in 2005 and my husband passed in 2006,we had no children.
    When I went to apply to widow benefit, they told me that I was to young to be a widow, and since then I cant get an right answer on when I will start getting the benefits, either what do I have to do as far application goes.
    It is very confuse to me, right now my disability check is on the amount of $ 425.00
    I need some advise .

    Thank you and God bless you all!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Cleide,

      You must be fifty years old to receive disabled widows benefits or sixty years old for benefits based on age. Any benefits paid before your full retirement age, sixty-seven, will be reduced. If your current disability benefit is Social Security Disability (SSDI) based on your own earnings record and you have limited income and assets, you may qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), which you can apply for at your local Social Security office.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  20. Mary says:

    I am 58 years old. I have been on SSD for over 20 years. I was married to my deceased, SSI eligible, husband for 25 years. He died 7 years ago. Somehow we determined that widows benefits would be less than the amount I receive through SSD. I understand I would not be eligible for widows monthly benefit anyway until age 60 or 62. I am planning to remarry this year. My future husband is 64 and receiving SSI. He is a widower. His wife died in 2010. Is there anything I should know? It doesn’t seem like remarrying before 60 will cost me anything, as my SSD is greater than widows benegpfits would be.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mary,

      As you describe your benefits, you would not lose benefits by remarrying; however, your future husband could lose his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or have it reduced. I suggest that you double check that your Social Security benefit on your own earnings record is higher than the widow’s benefit would be at your full retirement age. You can also find out how your future husband’s SSI will be affected by marriage, when your income will be considered in determining his financial eligibility for SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  21. cindy says:

    I am 58 and on ssd my husband of 23 yes just passed away he was 68 yes old. And on social security. Do I get 71.5 % of his benefits plus mine ? How does this work. Ive,been disabled for 15 yrs. Thank you..

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Cindy,

      If you take reduced widow’s benefits now, you would receive your disability benefit and an amount from your husband’s earnings record to bring you up to the amount you could get if you had only widow’s benefits. In other words, you would receive benefits from two earnings records. The other alternative is to leave the widows benefits until you reach full retirement age so that you can receive the full unreduced widow’s benefit at that time. It is advisable to discuss your options with a Social Security claims representative before you make a decision. 71.5% is the amount you would receive at age sixty. The reduction would be slightly more at age fifty-eight. (Disabled widows can qualify for widows benefits as early as age fifty.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  22. Emma says:

    My mother-in-law is 62 and recently lost her husband. She has been on disability for 11 years. Is she able to collect survivor benefits in addition to her disability or does she have to take one or the other? Since her husband worked she has now lost any income he was able to bring in. If she is unable to collect survivor benefits is she allowed to have any other supplemental income without losing her disability benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Emma,

      Your mother-in-law can choose between disability benefits and widows benefits, but her widows benefits will be reduced. If she waits to switch between widows benefits until she is full retirement age (66), she will receive full unreduced widows benefits. If she is getting Social Security disability (SSDI) and not Supplemental Security Income (SSI), other income will not affect her benefits. However, if she works, she needs to report her work earnings. Gross earnings below $1,070–$1090 in 2015–likely will not affect her disability benefits, assuming she has not recovered medically.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  23. Sheri Smith says:

    Hello, my question is , I was married for 36 yrs and been divorced only approximately 2 to 3 yrs now, and I’ve been diabled for almost 2 yrs now and receiving benefits. My ex-husband just passed away in an accident at work. I would like to know if I am eligible for Survivors been fits if I already recieve disability benefits for my disability? I would greatly appreciate any information on this matter. Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sheri,

      If your widow’s benefits, which would be reduced because you are under full retirement age, are be higher than your disability benefit, you have the choice of receiving an increase now or leaving the widow’s benefits alone until you reach full retirement age, at which time you could receive unreduced widow’s benefits. There are various factors to consider in the choice, so I recommend that you make an appointment with a Social Security claims rep to go over your options.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  24. Beverly westbrook says:

    I’m a disabled widow of 4 years and is on disabled widow income from social security,I’m now having breathing problems on a clap machine each night,and having heart problems this is after I applied for benefits,can I go back to the social security office to apply for more benefits,please let me know as soon as possible

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Beverly,

      Social Security Disability benefits, including disabled widow’s benefits, are calculated based on the worker’s earnings history. Accordingly, benefits are not increased when a person experiences a worsening health.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  25. Jennifer says:

    My mother just turned 50 years old. She was married to my father for over 10 years and they are now divorce.(my father is 100% disabled/retired veteran) . She remarried after my father and is a widow of a 100% disabled/retired military vet. She is also now disabled (due to a massive stroke) but has not been able to receive any benefits due to her age and she has no work history. Now that she is 50, I’m trying to see what she is eligible for. Can she be declared disabled at 50 with no work history? She only receives widow benefits monthly which is a little over 1000 a month. She is covered by Tricare standard. I’m trying to figure out if she is eligible for disability through my father or her deceased husband, in hopes that we can her Medicare. My father is 54 this year and her deceased husband would have been 54 this year as well. Please help!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jennifer,

      For me to respond to your question, I need more information. Please clarify the widow’s benefits your mother is receiving. Are they Social Security Disabled Widow’s benefits or some other widow’s benefits such as military widow’s?

      Thank you,

      Kay

  26. yvette says:

    I want to know how long before social security pay me and finish processing my workmans comp social security disability claim from 1996. I started receiving my monthly payments since September last year.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Yvette,

      You need to follow up on your back pay because it has been much longer than the norm for processing. If you are told you just have to wait, I suggest contacting your congressional representative.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  27. josh says:

    my mother is 56 and recieves disability, my father, her husband, passed away many years ago (1992). will she be able to recieve widower benifits as well as her disability? and if so, when?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Josh,

      Your mother should discuss this matter with Social Security. First if her benefit is more than she could get as a widow, clearly, she would stay on her own benefits. If it would be higher, she would need to decide whether to take reduced widow’s benefits now or leave them to take at a higher rate when she reaches full retirement age.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  28. Linda says:

    I am a 62 yr. old widow, and receiving ss widow benefits because I am unemployed. I am wondering if I am eligible to receive medicare or Medicaid insurance since I am a widow receiving ss widow benefits? I cant afford the Obama care insurance plans which cost me more than if I don’t have any insurance at all!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Linda,

      You will not be eligible for Medicare until you turn sixty-five, unless you are getting disabled widow’s benefits, in which case Medicare would start after you have received twenty-four months of disabled widows benefits.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  29. Liz says:

    My husband was getting disability he passed away in may we have 2 children under 16 i was told when the youngest turns 16 i will no longer get any money for me.I had a stroke in nov 2013 and surgey i havent worked in maybe 10 years will i be able to get disabled window benifits i am 45 my youngest wont be 16 for 2 years

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Liz,

      You will not be eligible for disabled widow’s benefits until you are age fifty. You can apply three months in advance of your fiftieth birthday.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  30. Lee says:

    Hello. My husband is stage 4 cancer. He currently receives @ $1700 monthly from disability. I am 54, not disabled and work full time. Will I receive any widower’s benefit?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lee,

      You could be eligible for monthly widow’s benefits as follows: full benefits at your full retirement age (67); reduced benefits beginning at age 60 if you are not earning too much at that time; reduced benefits prior to age 60 if you are disabled and eligible for more on his earnings record than your own. Otherwise, there is a $255 death benefit payable to you as his wife living in the same household with him.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sin

  31. Dori says:

    Can my disability payment go up because my ex-husband abandoned and divorced me in 2012? He brings home over $4000.00/ a month an d I have been forced to live on only $742.00/ a month. I am unable to even afford my own apt. Thank you for taking the time to read my question. Sincerely, Dori

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dori,

      It sounds as if you are receiving Social Security and SSI that total $742.00 a month. Those benefits will not go up because of your divorce. If you were married more than ten years, you will be entitled to divorced wife’s retirement benefits when you reach retirement age if your husband is receiving Social Security Retirement or Disability benefits. Similarly, if he were to die, you could receive divorced surviving spouse’s benefits once you reached retirement age.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

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