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Can I receive Social Security payments if I have been convicted of a felony?

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Learn when a disabled felon is eligible to receive Social Security income and whether a jailed felon’s family can get dependents benefits.

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Watch the Video: “Can I get Social Security income if I have been convicted of a felony?”

Social Security Disability Benefits While in Jail

If you are a convicted felon and you are disabled you may qualify for Social Security income; however, the Social Security Administration will not pay disability benefits for any month or part of a month during which you are confined to a jail, prison, or halfway house under the jurisdiction of a governmental corrections department or agency, if you are going to be in the corrections institution for more than thirty continuous days and you are convicted of a crime. Similarly, you will not receive payments while confined by court order and at public expense to an institution because you are found to be incompetent to stand trial or not guilty due to insanity or mental disease.

For example, if you were convicted of a crime and went to jail on January 10, 2014 for a sentence of more than thirty days, your benefits would be suspended and you would not be eligible for the January 2014 benefit, which is paid in February. Then if you were released to a halfway house run by a department of corrections, the suspension of benefits would continue. If you were released from the halfway house on parole on March 10, 2014, your benefits for April 2014 would be reinstated. Because benefits are paid in the month after they are due, you would receive your first reinstated benefit check in May 2014.

Reporting Requirements for your Social Security Disability Check

It is important to report promptly if it appears you will be in jail for more than thirty days because you will have to repay any overpayment that occurs because you are in a correctional facility.

Application for Disability Benefits While in Jail

If you are in prison and become disabled, you can apply for Social Security disability benefits while in jail, but benefits will not start to accrue until you had been disabled for five full calendar months or until the first full calendar month after you are released, whichever is later. For more information about when Social Security benefits begin and the benefit waiting period, see our article “If I Am Approved, How Much Social Security Disability Back Pay Will I Get?”

The Law Regarding Family Payment

Even when your Social Security Disability benefits are suspended because you are in jail, your family’s Social Security benefits will continue to be paid or, if you apply while incarcerated, their Social Security income will start after you’ve been disabled for five full calendar months.

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74 Comments

  1. James Blake says:

    I suffered spinal cord injury while incarcerated. I’m being told I have lost all consideration for being approved for SSI because i became disabled while incarcerated. How can this be? I can’t work. What am i supposed to do? Go back to prison? At least then I’ll have food, clothing, and shelter. I need help.Please.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear James,

      You do not indicate why you were incarcerated. If you were in jail because you committed a felony or were committing a felony (within the jail) that resulted in your disability injury, it is correct that you cannot receive SSI (Supplemental Security Income). With regard to Social Security Disability (SSD), the same exclusion applies if the felony occurred after October 19, 1980. If you committed the crime for which you were incarcerated in a state that does not specify any crimes as felonies, then the same exclusion from eligibility applies if you were sentenced for more than one year.)

      If you were incarcerated for a misdemeanor when you were injured and you were not committing a felony within the jail that led to your injury, then you may qualify for one or both of the disability programs. Also, when you reach retirement age, you may qualify for Social Security Retirement benefits if you have worked enough in Social Security-covered jobs. Reduced retirement is currently available at at 62. Currently, full retirement age with will benefits ranges from age 65 to age 67, depending on the year you were born.

      Kay

  2. James Blake says:

    I was convicted of a felony, sentenced to 16yrs. in prison. I got hurt playing volleyball while in prison. I am truly disabled: a bruised spinal cord with severe mobility issues.
    Although I am willing, I am unable to do any type of work. I’ve always worked before I was incarcerated. I am ineligible to receive any help whatsoever? No exceptions? I’m in North Carolina.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear James,

      I suggest that you contact state and county social service agencies to see if you can get assistance. With regard to SSDI and SSI, as I understand the published information about exclusion of coverage for individuals who have committed a felony, you would not be eligible. However, you may wish to discuss your situation with an attorney well-versed in Social Security law to see if there any nuances to the law that could help you.

      Kay

  3. Michael says:

    Will be sentenced to 15 months prison time soon, I now receive ssi benefits, when I am released what do I have to do…

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Michael,

      You will have to file a new application to receive SSI after you are released from prison. When you are within three to six months of being released, you can apply for SSI under Social Security’s pre-release program. That will allow your claim to be processed before you are released, but benefits will not start until after your release.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  4. Lisa says:

    My father has been incarcerated for over twenty years. he was not receiving any kind of SSI prior to arrest in 1990 when he was only 58 years old. He has grown old in prison and is now 81- My question is how to proceed to collect his SSI for my mother his legal spouse. She is also 81 years old. Thank you

    My father has grown old in prison. 58 years old in 1990 when he first went in, not receiving any SSI and now he is 81. is there any way for my poor mother, his legal spouse to collect his SSI benefits? We have never even tried.

    yu Lisa

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lisa,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security (SS) are two different things. SSI is paid to disabled people and people over age 65, who meet other requirements. If your mother is either a U.S. citizen or in the U.S. legally in one of certain immigration statuses and has income and assets below a certain limit, she may be eligible for SSI. To find out, she needs to file an SSI application with the Social Security Administration. She can start the application by calling the Social Security Administration (SSA) at 1-800-772-1213 and asking for an appointment to apply for SSI based on her age.

      For your mother to eligible for Social Security Retirement benefits based on her age, she has to have worked in jobs where Social Security taxes were withheld. Unless your father was receiving Social Security before he went into prison, no dependents benefits are payable to your mother while he is in jail. Should your father be released, both he and your mother could apply for benefits on his record.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  5. Bill.Ward. says:

    My family member who has been disabled due to a brain injury for several years was found incompetent to withstand trial 2 years ago. He was charged and taken to the medical ward of the jail and then sent to Napa State Hospital when he was found incompetent to go through a trial — for murder. It has been 2 years and still receiving his payment of about a thousand a month. SS Disability has not stopped, even after the family member over looking his finances has supposedly reported his incarceration. He was not found guilty, just incompetent. He will most likely stay at the state hospital since no nursing home will take him. What do we do with the money and the money that has been used for other expenses other than his care since he’s been jail?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Bill,

      You need to report the situation to the Social Security Adminsitration immediately. (I recommend going to an office.) If your family member is confined to an institution at government expense because he was found mentally incompetent to stand trial, he is not eligible for disability benefits and his benefits must be suspended. The money he was paid was an overpayment and will have to be returned. The sooner this is handled, the less legal exposure the representative payee will have. If the payee has proof of reporting earlier, such proof should be taken to the office.

      Note: Dependents (spouse or children) receiving benefits on the same record continue to be eligible for benefits.

      You can read more about the law that affects your family member at the follow SSA web address: https://secure.ssa.gov/apps10/poms.nsf/lnx/0202607330.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  6. sonny FREE says:

    while in prison i was approved for ssi by administrative law judge after i was released i year after being approved i was told by SS admin. that i would have to start the whole process over is that correct they said that the year was up while in prison

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sonny,

      Yes, enough time has passed since you were approved for SSI while being ineligible due to incarceration that you do need to apply again and get a current disability review to establish that you are still disabled.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  7. sunshine says:

    I receive ssd n my bf receives ssi if we decided to get married how would our benefits change?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sunshine,

      If you marry, your Social Security Disability (SSD) will not change. Your spouse would become eligible for Social Security dependent benefits after one year of marriage, assuming that your family maximum is more than your primary insurance(benefit) amount. You can find out the amount of your family maximum by calling Social Security at 1-800-772-1213. Whether or not your spouse’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment amount would go down before he (or she) became eligible on your Social Security record would depend on the amount of your Social Security and whether you have minor children. You could visit a Social Security office and talk with a claims representative to get a preview of whether your spouse’s SSI eligibility be affected.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  8. ellen says:

    The father of my child is incarcerated. He was told he could receive benefits because he has a record of being in the disability system since he was a child. I’m sure he will have to wait to be released though to receive anything. Will his child be able to receive anything , like a dependents check while hes incarcerated ? He wasn’t receiving anything before he went to jail, he didn’t reapply when he turned 18.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ellen,

      It sounds as if the father of your child was receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits as a minor. SSI does not pay dependent benefits. For any dependent benefits to be payable, the father would have to have enough Social Security-covered work to draw Social Security Disability (SSD).

      Neither program pays benefits to individuals who are incarcerated for thirty days or more. He can apply for SSI and/or SSD three months prior to his release, but benefits will not start until after he has been released.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Jasmine Simmons says:

        So if the father of my child was receiving ssi for disability
        And from the death of his father before he was incosarated
        With a life sentence will his son be able to receive these benefits now?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Jasmine,

          Supplemental Security Income (SSI) does not pay dependent benefits. Your child would not be eligible for Social Security benefits based on his father’s Social Security benefits because the Disabled Adult Child benefits that your child’s father was receiving were not paid on his own earnings record and are dependents benefits, not worker benefits.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  9. javier fernandez says:

    i was reciveing ssi ass a minor i am deaf from my left ear i went to juv for a misdeamener at 16 they stopped my benefits im now 28 how can i get them back

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Javier,

      If you believe that you are disabled and are not now working and earning $1,070 or more monthly, then you may be eligible for SSI or Social Security Disability benefits. To find out, you will need to file a claim. You can start your claim online if you wish at http://www.ssa.gov or call 1-800-772=1213 to make an appointment to file the claim in person or by phone.

      Sincerely,

      kay

  10. Max says:

    My son, 16, receives SSDI benefits based on his father’s disability. His father and I are separated. My son was recently sentenced to a juvenile residential facility for approximately 8 months. Will his benefits stop? And if they do, they can be restarted and will continue until he’s 18? Thanks.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Max,

      You need to report to the Social Security Administration (SSA) that your son is a resident of the juvenile facility. The exact type of the facility will determine whether his benefits will continue or be suspended. If his residence is considered incarceration, then the benefits will stop. If the benefits are suspended, they will start again when he is released, assuming that his father is still disabled and eligible.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  11. Timika says:

    I was convicted of a felony in 2004..prior misdemeanor in 1998, since my release of 4 months in jail and my discharge of probation in 2010…I haven’t been able to find employment due to my conviction. ..I have been diagnosed with depression and prescribed zoloft..am I eligible for ssi? Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Timika,

      I suggest that you discuss with your psychiatrist and/or therapist whether or not they believe your depression is severe enough to keep you from working. You might try to find out whether there are any organizations in your area that assist ex-convicts in getting back to work.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  12. Donna says:

    My son and I applied for his mental disability apx. 4 yrs ago. He was denied and denied again by the judge. We just got the letter two days ago from the appeals board which states that due to a whole list of things they did not agree, the appeals judge has to rehear his case. John was arrested 10 months ago and just today sentenced to serve 3 more yrs. My question is, is there any way that he can still be entitled to his backpay since he was not in jail at the time this all started and if the judge had considered ALL evidence the first time then this would have already been settled. Thank you for your advice Have a blessed day!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Donna,

      Your son is potentially eligible for SSI benefits for the months prior to his being incarcerated. If your son does not have an attorney representing him, he does need to appoint someone to represent him at the second hearing–either an attorney or non-attorney–in the event that he cannot be released to attend the hearing. Regardless, the judge needs to be given the date your son what first incarcerated and the date he was convicted (for a felony I assume, given the sentence).

      If he is approved, I am not certain that the money for retroactive months will be paid out while he is in jail. It may be held until he is released. If his approval involves his having a representative payee, it is possible that the money will be paid to his payee to be held until he is released. Note that if he is in jail longer than a year, as is expected, he will have to file a new SSI claim when he is released. He can file a pre-release application once he has a definite release date; he does not have to wait until he is actually released.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  13. rebecca says:

    MY WIFE BECAME DISABLED IN 2008,WE BOTH HAVE MEET THE CREDITS AND YRS THAT SSD REQUIERS.DOES SHE CLAM HER BENEFITS OR MINE.I DO MAKE MORE MONEY THEN HER.AND IF I WENT TO PRISON COULD SHE STILL RECIEVE DISABILITY IF SHE RECIEVING FROM MY BENEFITS (SSD).HOW WOULD MY WIFE FILE HER DISABILITY USING MY (SSD)IF IAM IN PRISION.ALSO I HAVE A TERMINAL DESEASE IF I BECOME WORSE OR DISABLED WHY IN PRISON HOW MY WIFE GO ABOUT GETTING HER DISABILITY. THANK YOU,AND WE LIVE IN DELAWARE.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rebecca,

      Please clarify the following so that I can answer your questions.

      Am I correct in understanding that you are now in prison?
      How old is your wife?
      Do you have any children under age sixteen and, if so, are they in your wife’s care?
      Were you receiving Social Security Disability benefits before going to prison?

      Thank you,

      Kay

  14. greg cacopardo says:

    my brother is a disabled veteran and is incarcerated for 4 years.does his social security continue or not and what should his plan of action be if any?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Greg,

      Your brother is not eligible for Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits while he is incarcerated. They should have been suspended. If he has a definite release date, he can contact Social Security in advance of the release to request that his benefits be restarted. If however, he was actually receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), not Social Security, he has to file a new application, which can be done once he has a definite release date. The prison should be aware of the pre-release application process and have application forms available.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  15. Syn Ramirez says:

    Since i was 9 ive been in and out of hospitals for cuttin my self i am now 31 ive never had my own apt ive been homeless since 17 and still am i have ptsd bipolor impluse controll disorder and adhd i have a criminal record that no one will higher me
    Cuz i do stuff off impluse im going to court no for a felony charge thats seriouse but im getting probation because the jude says i have mental heath issues and i need gelp not jail i been i also had a pcp history i sopped using in april 2013 only had one job my whole life. Ive been applying for ssi since i was 21 igot denyed then again a couple years ago and got denyed am i eligible. Or am i wasting my time mental heath runs in my fam i was born addicted toherion my mom and dad both are skiztos my son has adhd and rescives ssi bolth my parents

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Syn,

      I suggest that you hire an attorney who is knowledgeable in Social Security and SSI disability law and apply again. You do not have to pay any legal fees up front and you will pay attorney fees only if you are approved for benefits. Social Security law sets the amount your attorney can charge and the Social Security Administration pays the attorney directly from your retroactive award at the time they send your back pay to you. So, it’s all very easy and risk-free.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  16. Amy says:

    Hi, I was approved for disability back March of 2013 I never received any money due to having to self surrender to prison March 26th 2013.. I did notify social security, I was released to home confinement March 13th and I am on home detention until April 25th.. I went to the office letting them know all these things and I have back pay from before I was sent to prison just sitting there I was in prison for 11 months I guess my question is will I get my back pay and do I have to start all over again with the process.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Amy,

      Please clarify whether the benefits you refer to are Social Security Disability (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), so that I can respond.

      Thank you.

      Kay

      • Amy says:

        Hi it’s SSDI benefits.. Thank you..

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Amy,

          Thank you for the additional information. Your back pay for months prior to incarceration should be payable to you based on your report of being released from prison. If you were also approved for ongoing benefits, you are still disabled, and your approval did not include a medical review date that has already come up, your ongoing monthly benefits should start also. If you have not received payment within thirty days, follow-up with Social Security. If payment has to be reinstated by the payment center, ask the local office to follow-up to the payment center.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

          • Amy says:

            Thank you very much for the information, my follow up with a Dr date with SSDI isn’t until 2015.. I was told I wouldn’t get my back pay until I’m off home confinement, which is April 26th..

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Amy,

            If you are considered under the control of the prison authority, then it is correct that your Social Security would not be paid until you are off home confinement.

            Sincerely,

            Kay

  17. Amy says:

    Thank you for all the information, I had one more question about my disability and the federal restitution that I have to pay, do you know how that works with my back pay and my monthly benefit payment if they will take it all or is it a percentage, I do have an offset on my social security number anything information would be much appreciated thank you!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Amy,

      I am not sure what you mean by “federal” restitution. Garnishment can occur in the following situations: S

      To enforce child support or alimony obligations under 42 USC 659;
      To enforce a valid garnishment for court-ordered victim restitution under 18 USC 3613;
      To collect unpaid Federal taxes under 26 USC 6334(c);
      To have a portion of your check withheld to satisfy a current year Federal income tax liability under 26 USC 3402 (P); or
      Other Federal agencies will offset benefits to collect money from benefits to pay a non-tax debt owed to that agency according to the Debt Collection Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-134).

      Only a percentage of ongoing benefits will be garnished; however, all your back pay is potentially subject to garnishment.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  18. Janele says:

    My son is 16 and is incarcerated for 0-2 years. His father just passed away, is he able to received social security because his dad passed?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Janele,

      It is my understanding that no Social Security benefits are payable to anyone during incarceration. If you son is under age eighteen (or under age nineteen and enrolled full time in high school) when he is released, he could then qualify for survivor benefits. He can apply up to three months prior to his release, if he has a definite release date.

      You will not qualify for benefits on your former husband’s records. You have to have been married ten years and be old enough or have a child (of your ex-husband’s) under age sixteen in your care. Your son is not under age sixteen and he is not in your care and you were not married ten years, so no benefits are payable.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  19. Janele says:

    Also I was told since we were married in 95 and divorced in 2003 I should get social security also is that true?

  20. Janele says:

    Thank you Kay. What if IT am his Rep Played and he needs hygiene and different things while he is in jail, does he qualify then? If not will he get his back pay? Example his dad passed in April of 2014 he may get out in December 2014 will it retro back when his dad passed?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Janele,

      No Social Security or Supplemental Security Income benefits are payable for months that an individual is incarcerated. This means that he will not get back pay. He will first be eligible for benefits the month following his release and the benefit will be paid the month following when it is due. For example, if he were to be released in August, his September benefit would be paid in October. While he is in jail, any hygiene needs not met by the jail will have to be met by private source, such as a relative.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  21. Rosa Vargas says:

    My husband has a medical condition that prevents him from working. We applied for disability in Sept. 2011. He was arrested and convicted of a felony in 2013 and was sentenced to 3 1/2 years. I just received a letter from the social security administration stating that there’s a hearing scheduled for his disability claim he filed. He can’t attend the hearing because of his situation. I wanted to know what can he do and if this will affect his claim? He still has the same condition and has been getting medical attention for it in prison. Your help is greatly appreciated. Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rosa,

      You should help your husband pursue his claim with a hearing because he could be eligible for benefits for the months before he was incarcerated and for benefits after he is released. If he is approved, the back pay will be held until he is released. If any dependent benefits are payable, they can be paid despite his being in jail.

      It would be helpful to get a copy of his prison medical records so that current records can be submitted. You may need an attorney to present the case. If you can’t or don’t want to get one, then have your husband appoint you or someone else to represent him at the hearing.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  22. Shaela Edmondson says:

    Hello Kay, my sons father was receiving ssi benefits for shizophrenia before going to prison. We weren’t married but he is on my sons birth certificate can I apply for back benefits or any benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Shaela,

      You have posted two questions. This is apparently about your son’s biological father. My response is based on that assumption. If your son’s father was receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), no dependent benefits are payable. If he was receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits, then you can apply for benefits for your son. Usually dependent benefits are limited to six months prior to the month of application.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  23. carol says:

    Both me and my husband receive SSDI, he’s going to jail in a few months. My ssdi check is very small, compared to he’s. Can I get some of his SSdi….so I can have living expenses. I’m 59 and unable to work.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Carol,

      You have to be sixty-two years old to receive wife’s benefits from your husband’s record. If your Social Security Disability benefit is less than $741, you might qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Contact the Social Security Administration to file a claim as soon as your husband is incarcerated.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  24. Maurice says:

    Can i add a benificiary or add someone as a caretaker or get married to prevent benifits from being stopped if convicted of a felony. I have 6 months before my trial

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Maurice,

      If you were to marry, any benefits that were paid to your wife would be dependent benefits for her use and would be half of your current benefit. Marriage would not continue your benefits.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  25. Bonnie says:

    My mother was arrested 5/28/14. Her bond is too high for my family to bond her out, so she has been in jail for almost 30 days now. I am now taking over her house and caring for my teenage sister. My mother is receiving SSDI benefits. Because she is not yet convicted and still awaiting trial, which is in September, she will still receive her benefits each month unless she is convicted, correct? If she is convicted, is there a way to receive dependent benefits to assist with caring for my sister while she is incarcerated?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Bonnie,

      Your mother will continue to receive her benefit; however, if she is convicted she will be overpaid for any month that she is in jail, including the months before conviction. The sister’s dependent benefits will continue regardless of the status of your mother’s benefits. You should apply to be your sister’s payee right away so her benefits come in your name and you can legally manage the money. If your mother is released, she can reapply to be payee at that time.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  26. Georgina Hermsdorf says:

    I live in Texas and am in a common law marriage to a man with mental health issues and substance abuse issues for which he receives social security disability for and I am representative payee to. It has come to the point he has become domestically abusive and it pretty much looks like things will end up with him in jail (Personally I feel that will only make him worse, that all concerned would be better served if he was committed to a mental health/substance abuse facility for intensive long term treatment) if that happens it will cause me great financial difficulty as I lost my car and job due to his excessive drinking, the rental agreement and utilities are in his name, is there a possibility of my continuing to collect those benefits at least long enough for me to get a car and hopefully get my old job back.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Georgina,

      You cannot receive your “common-law” husband’s benefits. They will stop if he is either incarcerated or placed in a publicly funded medical facility. (If he is in a medical facility with Medicaid paying more than half, then his benefit would drop to $30 for the purchase of personal items he needs.)

      If you meet the specific legal requirements to be legally married according to Texas laws that govern common-law marriage,then the Social Security Administration will treat you as legally married. If that is the case, you can receive wife’s benefits beginning with reduced benefits at age sixty-two or full benefits at your full retirement age. Otherwise, you can receive benefits at any age if you are caring for your husband’s child under age sixteen or your husband’s disabled child.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  27. S Lane says:

    My husband has been receiving social security disability due to mental ill ness for ten years. His check is made payable to me, for him. We also have two children ages ten and seventeen that I also receive payments for. My husband has recently been arrested. If he is convicted will my children and I lose his disability?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sadie,

      If your husband is convicted, his Social Security will stop. The children’s benefits will continue.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  28. sarah neese says:

    Out of the state of ohio…will my child lose disability vendors from her father if he goes to prison? ??

  29. savannah says:

    My son receives social security I was convicted of a felony in 2013 would this stop his social security because of my conviction.

  30. Angel says:

    My friend went to jail for two weeks. She recieves disability benefits. Will they with hold any of her benefits. They were misdemeanors by the way.Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Angel,

      Your friends disability benefits will not be suspended because she was not incarcerated for thirty days.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  31. Arlecia C says:

    My 14 was picked up on felony charges in June but has not been convicted yet. The courts are still in pretrial status. What should I do about his benefits?

  32. Isaiah S. Gant says:

    Is there contained sowhere in the Social Security Administration regulations a blanket exclusion from receiving SSI benefits for an individual who has been convicted of Social Security fraud–let’s say the fraud involved regular Social Security benefits, like SSDI? If there is such an exclusion, would you be kind enough to identify for me where that particular exclusion can be found? Thank you in advance for any assistance you may be able to provide.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Isaiah,

      I am not knowledgeable regarding penalties for Social Security fraud beyond possible fine and/or imprisonment. I suggest that you ask the Social Security Administration.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

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