Types of Social Security Disability Decision Letters | Disability Advisor
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What is the difference between a fully favorable and a partially favorable Social Security Disability decision?

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Learn about a partially favorable versus a fully favorable Social Security Disability decision and learn about appealing a partially favorable decision.

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A Fully Favorable Social Security Disability Decision

A fully favorable Social Security Disability Decision means that your claim has been approved and your benefits will begin based on the date of disability that you claimed and that you will receive ongoing monthly benefits.

A Partially Favorable Social Security Disability Decision

In contrast, a partially favorable decision means that your claim has been approved, but with limitations that will cause you to receive less money than a fully favorable decision would have. There are two situations that result in partially favorable decisions. The decision on your claim might be partially favorable because Social Security determined that you became disabled on a date later than the one you claimed; and therefore, your benefits will start later. Or, the decision on your claim might be partially favorable because Social Security has determined that your disability has ended and that you will receive a one-time-only payment.

Consider a Social Security Disability Appeal

If you receive a partially favorable Social Security Disability decision, look at the decision carefully. If you believe a mistake has been made, you have the right to appeal. At this point, it would be a good idea to get legal assistance from an attorney who is experienced with Social Security Disability claims. For information on how to appeal, appeal deadlines, and how attorneys get paid, visit our articles “I Was Denied Social Security Disability. What Can I Do?” and “How Do Social Security Disability Attorneys Get Paid for Representing You in Your Disability Claim”

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