Loading...
You are here:  Home  >  Claims Process  >  Current Article

Is there a Social Security Disability list of impairments, that is, a list of illnesses and injuries, that Social Security considers disabling?

By   /   15 Comments

Learn about the Social Security Disability List of Impairments that lists illnesses, symptoms and signs that Social Security considers disabling.

social-security-disability-list-of-impairments

Watch the Video: "Is there a Social Security Disability list of impairments, that is, a list of illnesses and injuries, that Social Security considers disabling?"

The Social Security Disability List
of Impairments

Social Security has a list of illnesses and injuries that are considered disabling but only if they are accompanied by certain symptoms, clinical findings, or test results. Having a certain diagnosis is not enough for your claim to be automatically approved; but if you have one of the conditions in the Social Security List of Impairments and you also have the symptoms and signs that are listed, then your condition will be considered disabling, without further investigation. Similarly, if your diagnosis is not listed, but you have a condition with symptoms and findings comparable to one of the listed conditions, your claim will be approved.

An Example of an Illness in the Listings

For rheumatoid arthritis to meet the listings and be automatically considered disabling, it must be accompanied by positive ANA test results and either degeneration of a weight-bearing joint that necessitates the use of a cane or loss of the ability to perform fine manual manipulation.

Qualifying for Disability When Your Illness is Not on the List

If the condition for which you are claiming disability is not one of those in the listings or is not accompanied by the required signs or test results, you could still qualify for benefits. If you do not meet the Listing, your claim will be evaluated to determine whether you can do occupations you have done in the past and, if you are under age fifty, whether you can perform a new occupation. For more information about how the Social Security Disability List of Impairments fits into the disability evaluation as a whole, please see our article “How Does the Social Security Administration Apply Social Security Disability Laws to Determine If I Am Disabled?”

    Print       Email

15 Comments

  1. Alyssa Price says:

    Hi I have OCD depression and anxiety but not a lot of history and I’ve never been able to stay at a job longer than a year because of these issues. I also have to be diagnosed for a foot problem that causes me to be unable to walk real good and not stand for long periods of time but little to no doctor history. Will I still be eligible for ssi disability?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Alyssa,

      Many people are approved for Social Security and SSI disability for multiple conditions, such as you have, even when they do not have much medical history. But it’s not easy! You need an attorney who really knows Social Security law and procedures to present your claim to the Social Security Administration.

      With the proper help from a qualified attorney, you can get disability benefits if you are disabled according Social Security’s rules. I strongly suggest that you call the Disability Advisor toll free at 1-888-393-1010 and talk with one of their attorneys. There’s no obligation for a consultation. And, when you hire one of their attorneys, you pay for their services only if you win your claim and get benefits!

      Best regards,

      Kay

  2. Tracey says:

    Hi,

    I have fibroid myalgia, high blood pressure, rheumatoid arthritis in remission and Degenerative changes at
    bilateral radiocarpal joints. Right scapholunate disassociation with
    distal radius extending into the scapholunate space. Apparent
    ankylosis between the left distal radius and lunate and Patient has evidence of chronic wrist joint space narrowing and degenerative changes Will I be approved?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tracey,

      Apologies for the delayed response. Our website has had a software problem, which is now resolved.

      Whether or not you are approved will depend on how and how much your conditions limit you and whether or not you can perform substantial gainful activity (SGA) in an occupation you have performed in the past and, if you are under age fifty, other occupations you could perform.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  3. Lisa Nippers says:

    Hi my name is Lisa. I was born with cerebral palsy and with scoliosis. I was denied on my first claim so I appealed the decision with an attorney. It took over a year and finally had a hearing. After my hearing I was told by my attorney it would take about 30 to 90 days for a decision. It’s been about 40 days. I called SS today and the said my decision was made. They told me over the phone I was denied and I’ve not receive a letter or notice from my SSD attorney. Is it possible I’ve been denied or perhaps the person I was speaking to made a mistake? I called my attorney and the secretary tells me they cannot tell me that I’ve been denied over the phone. I know I have enough information needed to present my case. My attorney has all this information also. I was 9 months pregnant at the time of my hearing

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lisa,

      It is highly unusual that you received a hearing decision over the phone. In fact, I have never heard of it happening. You and your attorney should receive letters at the same time. I suggest calling again and ask whether the decision letter has actually been sent or is being prepared. It seems that in some cases it takes a month or more for the letter to be prepared and mailed after the decision has been made.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  4. marian says:

    I have Genarilized Anxiety Disorder and P.T.S.D and Border Line Personality Disorder I have applied for SSD and just filled out a Adult function report. Will I still have to see a SS D.R. My anxiety is so bad that I have panic attacks at the thought of leaving my house and also have anxiety around people I do not know.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marian,

      You may still be asked to go to consultative examination. Do be sure to attend the exam because if you do not your claim may be denied. Perhaps you could have someone you trust make the trip to and from the doctor’s office with you.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • marian says:

        Thank you if I do have to go I will have my mom go as she takes me where I need to go any way, I don’t drive.

  5. Lisa says:

    Is bad liver from drinking a deases(sp)? Does it meet the list requirements? Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lisa,

      Social Security law prohibits the payment of disability benefits for disability caused by drug addiction or alcoholism or for a condition whose drug addiction and/or alcoholism played a significant role in their disability. That said, I would suggest that the person involved file a claim to get a formal decision. To answer your direct question, whether or not liver disease meets the listings depends on its severity.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  6. Timothy Johnston says:

    Hi I have a long story with severe back problems that have required two surgeries about nine years apart to enable me to walk again each time. I’m 54 and permanently disabled according to SS. My final employer for which I worked over 27 years as a blue collar worker carried supplemental income insurance and I purchased on my own additional ehancement from the 60% of salary to the 66.6% of salary level. The private carrier requires continuing proof of disability that need Physician’s statements. My current PCP and 99% (that is a rough estimate not a statistically reasearched figure) of the practitioners of medicine in our local community hospital / clinic have refused to fill out the required form. The two reasons I’ve encountered so far are ” I’m not a disability doctor ” and ” He does not believe in disability.” and always gives a full release within twelve months from surgery. I’m confused about this in two ways. I understand that doctors do not decide disability in the first place they simply provide medical records tests and diagnosis codes, and treatment options if any. Secondly if our society acknowledges the need for disability insurance would not that necessitate that authorized practitioners understand and acknowledge it as well. I suspect that behind the answers given lies the mere reluctance to engage the necessary paperwork and legal cooperation with an often arduous process of assessment. Any wisdom anyone can offer would be appreciated because there are a host of people with these types of problems and not all seem to be getting the help they need. Many have given to society by working hard many years find they are now being tossed aside or allowed to “fall through the cracks” If this is the care we get for having given generously our efforts the next generation needs to be taught to twidle there thumbs while it all comes crashing down for lack of workers available for hire.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Timothy,

      You are correct that long-term disability insurance companies (and Social Security law) do not expect physicians to decide whether an individual is disabled or not. What is needed is a description of the person’s condition including diagnoses and limitations. Usually this information can be obtained be obtained from a primary care physician who is aware of your history and who performs an in office evaluation to see if you still have the same limitations.

      I have heard of doctors who “do not believe in disability” and won’t complete forms; but based on my experience, they make up a small percentage of the profession. Your medical community is apparently an exception. The only suggestions that I have are either to try to establish yourself as a patient of physician in another town, one who will be willing to follow your condition and assess it annually, or to make an appointment with a physiatrist for physical capacities evaluation, which can be expensive.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  7. Todd says:

    Hi, my name is Todd and I have just received my PI assessment. My injury is to my right ankle. I had a non union fracture which required surgery to repair. The surgery didn’t help and I had another procedure to remove the hardware but that didn’t help either. My injury came on the job as a UPS driver. It has been a 3.5 year ordeal now and it seems as tho things are coming to an end.
    My assessment came back at 5% permanent whole body impairment. I was also given permanent restrictions of limited walking on uneven ground, limited stairs, maximum of 35 pounds lifting if consistent and 50 pounds if only occasionally. I might even have limited standing or walking but not sure. I was told that im basically 100% disabled from my current job and my past work history is pretty much warehouse manual labor. I’ve been at ups for 14 years. I’m curious if you believe that I would qualify for disability benefits? I haven’t worked for 3 years now and don’t really have any job experience in anything that doesn’t go against my restrictions. I’m assuming I’ll be given a settlement in the near future but wanted to ask you about this. I’m 39 years old. Thanks
    Todd

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Todd,

      With your limited work history, you might be eligible because you might not have transferable skills to work in a lighter job. Whether or not you are approved, I suggest that you contact your state’s department of vocation rehabilitation to get help in identifying jobs you might be able to do or to get training to be able to return to a different kind of work.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>