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What do I have to report to the Social Security Administration once I start to get SSI benefits?

By   /  March 3, 2016  /  910 Comments

Find out everything you need to know about reporting changes for your SSI benefits and avoid SSI overpayments and underpayments.

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ssi-benefits

When to Report Changes that
Affect SSI Benefits

When you receive SSI benefits you must report improvements in your health and any changes in your income, resources, and living arrangements to the Social Security Administration so that they receive the report by the tenth of the month following the change.

Who Needs to Report

If you are an adult and receive your payment directly, you are primarily responsible for reporting changes, however, your spouse or anyone whose income is considered in determining your payment amount can also report changes that could affect SSI payment. If you are a minor, your representative payee has primary responsibility for reporting changes, although any parent whose income is deemable may report.

If you are an adult with a representative payee, the payee is primarily responsible for reporting changes, but you can make reports yourself. For information about representative payees, see our articles “What Is a Social Security Disability Representative Payee? “ and “What Responsibilities Does a Representative Payee Have to Maintain SSI Disability Eligibility for a Child?

How to Report

You will need your Social Security number and, if you are reporting for another person who is the SSI recipient, the recipient’s Social Security number. You will also need the date that the change took place. You may report in person or by mail. In some cases you may report by telephone or online.

Why It’s Important to Report Changes

SSI eligibility is determined on a month by month basis. Everything that the SSA asks you to report could change the amount of your SSI monthly payment due in a subsequent month. For more information about when income is counted in determining benefits, please visit our article “When I Complete My SSI Application Form, I Am Asked to Declare My Income. Does All My Income Affect My SSI?

If your report is late, you could be penalized with a reduction in your SSI payment in the amount of $25 to $100. If you give false information or withhold important information that affects your benefits, you could be sanctioned, which means that the SSA could suspend your SSI payments for a period ranging from six to twenty-four months.

What to Report

1. You move or change your address.

In addition to notifying the post office, provide SSA with your new resident address and phone as soon as you know them, even if you have direct deposit or Direct Express® for delivery of your payment. This is important because SSA has to review with you your new living arrangements to determine whether your payment amount should change or remain the same. Additionally, if your mail from SSA is returned your payments may be stopped.

If anyone else who is moving with you gets Social Security or SSI benefits, tell SSA their names too. If your move involves moving into or out of someone else’s home, be sure to let the SSA know as the change might increase or decrease the SSI benefits you are due.

2. You change direct deposit accounts.

When you want your SSI benefits paid to a different bank account, be sure to keep the old account open until the first payment goes into the new account. It takes thirty to sixty days for SSA to process the change.

Be sure to sign up for direct deposit with your financial institution. Another alternative is to call the SSA and have your direct deposit information changed over the telephone. You will need both your new and old bank account numbers handy when you call SSA. You can find them on your personal checks or account statements or on the paperwork the financial institution gave you when you opened the account.

3. If you receive an incorrect SSI Payment that is wholly or in part not due to you, notify SSA immediately and be prepared to return the overpayment at the time you file the report.

4. Your health improves.

If you are getting SSI because you are disabled and your health improves substantially, you must report the improvement so that the SSA can determine whether you are still disabled according to SSI disability laws and still eligible for payment.

5. Someone moves into or out of your household or a member of your household dies or is born or adopted.

This report is important because SSA may need to recalculate your benefit because such a change may result in a change of in-kind support or deemed income. For a discussion of how living arrangements affect your SSI benefits, see our article “Why Will Social Security Ask about my Living Arrangements When I Apply for SSI Disability?” For an explanation of deemed income, please see “Why Do I Have to Give Information about My Family’s Income and Assets When I Apply for SSI Benefits?

6. You start or stop work or have other work-related changes.

Report right away if you start or stop work. Let the SSA know when there is any change in your work duties or pay or when you start working for a different employer. Be prepared to provide the following information: your job title, job duties, work hours, rate of pay, and the name and address of your employer. Additionally report if you start or stop paying for work expenses that are related to your disability.

Wages need to be reported monthly by mail, by fax, or in person so that they are received by the tenth of each month. If you qualify for telephone reporting of wages, you must report by the sixth of each month.

If you are self-employed, you must provide equivalent information for self-employment activity and provide SSA with an estimate of gross earnings and business expenses. You must also maintain business records and provide SSA with a copy of your federal income tax return annually.

7. There is a change in your income or the income of family members.

You must report all changes in your income including new income and income that ends or changes in amount. Be prepared to provide verification of the change. SSA does not count many kinds of income against your SSI payment, but the laws governing income for SSI are quite detailed. Therefore, it is important to report all changes, rather than trying to determine what is and isn’t countable.

If you are married and live with your spouse, you also need to report changes in your spouse’s income and in the income of any children in the household. The only exception is that you do not need to report increases in your Social Security benefits.

If your child under age eighteen gets SSI and lives with you, you also need to report changes in the eligible child’s income, your income, and the income of any child in the household who does not receive SSI benefits as well as the other parent’s income if the other parent also lives in the household.

8. Changes in marital status.

If you or an SSI-eligible gets married or divorced, report the change in status to the SSA so that they can refigure your SSI payment. Also report if you become separated from your spouse.

9. You change your name by marriage, divorce, or court order.

Report your name change as soon as possible so that you do not encounter problems cashing a check, using your Direct Express® card, or receiving direct deposit of your SSI benefits.

10. There is a change in your resources.

Tell the SSA if there is a change in what you own. Many assets do not count toward the $2,000 limit for individuals and $3,000 limit for couples, but it is best to report all acquisitions and dispositions to avoid overpayments. Report immediately if your resources go over the resource limits. Sale of an excluded asset may affect your eligibility in the following month, so it is important to report the sale of real estate or an automobile.

If your child is receiving SSI, then it is necessary to report both changes in what the child owns and what the child’s parent owns if the parent lives in the same household.

If you are getting provisional payments while trying to sell a resource, let the SSA know as soon as the asset has been sold and retain the funds from the sale to repay the provisional payments.

11. Someone starts or stops paying for your living expenses.

Let SSA know if someone gives you money, food, or free housing or if someone pays for your food, utilities, rent or mortgage. Also, tell SSA if you stop receiving such assistance.

12. You enter or leave an institution.

Report as soon as possible if you enter or leave a hospital, nursing facility, intermediate care or residential institution, halfway house, prison, jail, or public emergency shelter or any other kind of institution.

Your SSI may or may not continue depending on the type of institution, the length of your stay, and who covers the cost of the stay. Report promptly to avoid possible overpayments. It is a good idea to arrange in advance for a friend or relative to report such a change to SSA in the event that you are unable to do so. For more information about how residence in an institution affects your SSI eligibility, see our article “Why Will Social Security Ask about my Living Arrangements When I Apply for SSI Disability?

13. You leave the United States.

For SSI purposes, the United States means the fifty states, the District of Columbia, and the Northern Mariana Islands. It does not include Puerto Rico. If you plan to leave the United States, tell the Social Security Administration before you leave. Provide the date you plan to leave and the date you plan to return.

Usually, you are not eligible for SSI after you have been outside the United States for thirty or more days in a row. Then you have to be back in the U.S. for at least 30 days in a row before you are again considered a resident. There are some exceptions. Dependent disabled children of military personnel assigned to shore duty overseas may be eligible to receive SSI while they are living abroad. There are also some exceptions for students studying abroad.

14. You are under age twenty-two and have a change in student status.

If you are under age twenty-two and are working, report to SSA the date that you start or stop going to school or change the number of hours per week that you are enrolled. The amount of SSI benefits you are eligible to receive may change based on your student status.

15. The SSI recipient’s representative payee dies or misuses funds.

If you become aware that your funds are being misused or that your representative payee dies, report this immediately to the Social Security Administration so that it can arrange for another representative payee. If the SSI recipient is not able to make a report, anyone becoming aware of such circumstances can report.

16. You stop working toward your PASS goal or change your goal.

If you have a Plan to Achieve Self-Support, which is also called a PASS, and you stop following the plan  or change your goal, you must report the change because you may no longer be eligible to set money aside for the PASS and your SSI benefit may be reduced or terminated.

Additional Reporting for Aliens Getting SSI

1. Your immigration status changes.

Some immigration statuses allow for the receipt of SSI benefits. Others do not allow payment or limit the period of time you can get SSI. Therefore, it is very important that you report any change in your immigration status. Usually if you become a U.S. citizen you can continue to receive SSI. If your status changes from a refugee or refugee-similar immigration status to becoming a permanent resident, your SSI may continue for a time.

2. Changes in your sponsor’s and your sponsor’s spouse’s income and resources.

If you came into the U.S. with a sponsor, who must report changes in your sponsor’s income and resources and changes in the income and resources of your sponsor’s spouse.

Things Other People Should Report for Your SSI Benefits

1. The person receiving SSI dies.

Report to SSA as soon as an SSI recipient dies. Any SSI payment that has not been cashed or deposited before death is not due and must be returned. Additionally if the deceased’s SSI payment was being sent to a bank, any monies deposited after the person’s death must be retuned to Social Security. Notify the bank as well as SSA. The bank will take care of returning the funds.

2. Any change that occurs at a time that the SSI recipient is not well enough to report.

Arrangements should be made in advance for someone who is in frequent contact with the SSI recipient to report any changes that the recipient cannot report.

3. The SSI recipient is no longer able to manage his or her funds.

Someone should report to SSA if the person receiving SSI loses the ability to direct the use of his or her funds so shelter, food, medical care, other basic needs are met before less basic purchases are made. Should this occur, SSA can appoint a representative payee to receive the SSI payment and see that the SSI recipient’s needs are met.

Additional Reporting if you live in California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York or Vermont

If you live in one of the named states, also report the following changes, which may affect the amount of SSI state supplement you are eligible to receive.

California—Let the SSA know if you were regularly eating your meals outside your home and start eating at home—or vice versa.

New York—Report if you were regularly eating your meals outside your home and start eating at home—or vice versa. Also report if you live with other people and begin to prepare your own meals by yourself rather than preparing meals with others in the household—or vice versa.

Hawaii, Michigan and Vermont—Let SSA know if you live in a facility that provides different levels of care and your care level changes. For example, you might move from an assisted living apartment to a nursing home in the same facility.

Massachusetts—Tell the SSA if you or you and your spouse either stop paying or start paying more than two-thirds of the living expenses for the household in which you are living.

Just a reminder: Any of these changes may result in a change in your SSI benefits. A prompt telephone report by the sixth of the month after the month in which the change occurs or an in- person or mail report received by the tenth of the month will protect you from overpayments or underpayments.

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  • Published: 6 months ago on March 3, 2016
  • By:
  • Last Modified: March 4, 2016 @ 4:33 pm
  • Filed Under: SSI

910 Comments

  1. Ray says:

    Greetings, I am representative payee for my daughter. At the moment we usually collect $796 on her behalf and it included $63 from state of ca. I called to report a new birth in our family and the service reps (twice called) both said no worries. This is strange considering I am an independent contractor and my wages fluctuate month to month. This month in particular I have earned more than normal and I am afraid I will go over the allowed amount or earnings. As of now Social Security has us as Me, daughter (sis recip.) and my wife, we all live together. Of course if my son is added then that will expand that.
    My question is , should I just fax a letter stating he was born april 2016 and send a fax of his ss card and birth cert. also.

    Thanks in advance.
    also if you could let me know allowed amount for California currently and if they add my son.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ray,

      You are right that it is important to get your second child on your daughter’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) record so an allotment from your income will be made for her support. With two parents and one ineligible child and with all family income from parents’ work income,the maximum income to get at least $1 of SSI is $4,158 gross wages or net self-employment.

      Note that as an independent contractor you are self-employed and your net income. Because self-employment business expenses do not always occur in the same month as invoices are collected from clients, the usual method for calculating SSI is for you to give an estimate of net profit for the whole year and that figure is divided by twelve and charged evenly over all months. Then after taxes are filed, you submit the business tax form from your tax return and your exact net profit is divided by twelve months and charged evenly over the prior year. At that time, either more SSI will be owed or you will have an overpayment to repay. (Note that if anticipated annual earnings change during the year, you can adjust the estimate mid-year.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  2. Charles Hinckley says:

    Can I report my new part time job online or do I have to go in to SS office and do this. I collected SSD

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Charles,

      I do not see reporting work in the SSA website’s list of things that Social Security Disability (SSD) recipients can report online. I suggest that you write up a statement of when you started work, who you work for, the kind of work, and number of hours per week and take that and your first month’s pay stubs to your local office. Ask for a date stamped copy of your report so that later there is no question of your having reported your work. Before visiting the office, it may be helpful for you to read over the Red Book about work incentives offered to SSD recipients and decide whether you want to request a Ticket to Work. The Red Book is available online at http://www.ssa.gov or from your local office.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Veronica mcmahon says:

        Hey I got letter from SSA a billing statement I get it for my son does this mean he’s not going to receive benefits anymore

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Veronica,

          A billing statement for an overpayment could mean that your son is no longer eligible and an overpayment has occurred. I recommend that you take the letter to Social Security for an explanation. If benefits have been terminated, you should have gotten a letter giving you appeal rights. You also should have gotten a letter explaining the calculation of the overpayment.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  3. Lester Taulbee says:

    I am a representative payee for my minor child who lives with me. I am on disability. Her mother and I are divorced. I have custody of my child but she spends a certain amount of time with her mother throughout the year. Since I have no earned income, Is her mother legally allowed to claim the child as a dependant, If I agree, and receive the child tax credit even though I am the representative payee?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lester,

      Who is payee and who, if anyone, can claim the child as a tax dependent when the child is receiving SSI are two separate issues, so how the child is handled in terms of taxes does not affect who is payee. I suggest that you contact the IRS or a tax accountant to determine who can legally claim the child on their taxes.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  4. gae hill says:

    i was ssi for 19 years due to mental I went to work and worked for 2 years with help of voc rehab..i got hurt on the job and have been off work 3 and half years drawing workers comp up to july 2016 In which I reapplied for ssi, what happens if I get back on ssi and I get settlement due to injury..can I buy a home and pay off all my bills with it and not get penilized if I get my ssi back in oklahoma

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Gae,

      If you are approved for SSI (Supplemental Security Income), a workers comp settlement will count as income in the month you receive it and if you used it for a down payment on a house, for example, the following month, you would be eligible for SSI again the month after the house purchase closed.

      If you are approved for Social Security Disability (SSD aka SSDI), your SSD back pay will be offset (reduced) because you have received workers compensation (WP). If you later get a WC settlement, it will be prorated out, possibly beginning with the date your weekly or biweekly WC payment stopped and depending how large it is possibly continuing into the future. This means that you will have to use at least part of your settlement to repay a Social Security overpayment. Accordingly, if SSI is not involved, it would be best not to spend the WC settlement until you know how much will be left after repaying the SSD overpayment and until you know whether your ongoing SSD will be reduced.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  5. Amy says:

    My sister is on disability. She tutored some students earlier this year earning maybe $100 a month from Jan. – March (total of $350). She did not report this income because she thought it was de minimis. Last week her (horrible) husband told here he was divorcing her and is going to leave her “with nothing”. She is afraid he is going to report her failure to disclose the tutoring income to social security and that she will then lose her SSI benefits entirely. She is terrified and doesn’t know what to do. She is afraid if she self-reports at this point (many months late), she will possibly lose her benefits as well. What should she do?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Amy,

      Your sister’s best course of action is to report her work earnings as soon as possible and present copies of her pay checks or pay stubs. If your sister is receiving Social Security Disability (SSD) only, her small amount of work will not affect her benefits. If she is getting Supplemental Security Income (SSI), the first $65 ($85 if she has no other income) gross earnings and half of the excess is excluded. For example, $100 monthly earnings result in an SSI reduction of either $17.50 or $7.50. Since your sister knew she should have reported, she will need to repay the overpayment. If she gets SSI, she should also report as soon as her husband moves out to have her SSI amount redetermined. Lastly, it might be helpful to her to read about Social Security and SSI work incentives in Social Security’s Red Book, which is available online at http://www.ssa.gov or from a local Social Security office.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  6. Beth king says:

    Hi Kay,
    My mother moved to Kansas to live near me as she is mentally ill and I help care for her. She owns a trailer and when she moved here she didn’t know she needed to try to sell it. She found out she did recently so she let ssi know and they had her sign an agreement to sell. The same day she was there, they mailed out a letter stating she is ineligible and will not be receiving ssi from the Date she moved here and for August she will not be receiving anything. Doesn’t the agreement mean she will still receive ssi while selling it? She will be homeless if she doesn’t get her ssi…

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Beth,

      She may be ineligible and overpaid up until she signed the agreement because the agreement likely is only for the future. That said, I would expect her to be eligible in August. I suggest that she visit Social Security to get an explanation. If she has to borrow money for her August rent until it is straightened out, make it a written loan to be repaid as soon as she gets her August benefit. She can also request waiver of collection of the overpayment based on not being at fault because she didn’t know she had to sell the trailer.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Brian White says:

      I started working two months ago and ssi di keeps sending checks which i spent due date my bipolar conditions. What is penalty for this?

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Brian,

        You can minimize the consequences of your actions by reporting now that you started working so that your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits can be recalculated and your eligibility re-evaluated considering your work activity. If you used benefits you knew you were not eligible for, you will be required to repay the money. You can set up a payment plan.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

        • Jerics says:

          Ive been on ssd/ssi since 2010. At the time I already had a son and a live in boyfriend. I don’t believe they took his wages into account when determining my benefits. His job has changed since then and in 2014 I gave birth to our daughter. I never reported his job changes or my daughter’s birth. We are not married, nor are we engaged or call each other husband/wife. I didn’t know I had to report her birth since they sent me her social security card and online it says only report if youre married and living together. Where we live and our rent hasn’t changed and neither has my medical condition. Some advice would be helpful as I’m now in a panic thinking I’m going to lose my benefits. Thank you in advance.

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Jerics,

            For your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, you do not need to report the increase in your boyfriend’s income because you are not married to him. If your contribution to shelter and food expenses has decreased, you need to report that because you might no longer be paying your share of those costs. If a reduction in your contribution has decreased, also report the date of birth of your daughter because with her birth, your share dropped to one-fourth (four in the household) instead of one-third (three in the household).

            If your son is receiving Social Security dependent benefits on your earnings record, you should report the birth of your daughter and apply for dependent benefits for her.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

          • Jerics says:

            Thank you so much for your response. My contributions have stayed the same since getting disability. Im not sure if my son gets dependant benefits. I’m a little confused about the share dropping part. Are you saying that they will lower my income because they expect my minor children to contribute to the income somehow? Are they counting them as adults? Thanks again.

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Jerics,

            Your first step is to find out what kind of benefits you are getting.If you are receiving Social Security Disability (SSD) and not Supplemental Security Income (SSI), who lives in your household and how much you contribute to household expenses does not matter and does not have to be reported. Usually children’s benefits are paid separately, but you can call Social Security at 800-772-1213 to check whether dependent Social Security benefits are payable. If they are, your son and daughter should be getting them and you need to apply for them.

            If you are receiving only Supplemental Security Income (SSI), to get the maximum benefit you have to pay your share of shelter and food expenses. When you had three people in the household, your share was one-third of the total expenses. When your daughter was born, your share was less, one-fourth. The age of the household members does not matter in calculating share. For SSI, you have to report changes in members of the household and if you stop paying your share.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  7. Donnell says:

    I get s.s.I my husband works our car is breaking down we want to trade it in for a better car if we do will it effect my s.s.i

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Donnell,

      Changing cars will not affect your SSI because you will still have only one vehicle.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • jimmy says:

      i had a familiar question like that one. what if i add 2 cars to my insurance policy? like i will add my sons car to my policy. will that affect anything?

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Jimmy,

        If your name is not on your son’s car, it will not matter where the car is insured. The car is not your asset so it does not affect your SSI.

        If your name is on your son’s car, you have to declare your ownership of the car to Social Security regardless of where it is insured. The car with the higher equity value (retail value less amount owed on it, if any) will be excluded. The less valuable car will count toward your resource limit.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  8. J says:

    Hi. I received 541 a month from ssi..I don’t pay rent but I sometimes buy my own food…am I entitled to an increase in my ssi.ss office wrote down I don’t buy my food separately from the household but I do on some occasions.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear J.,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for the primary purpose of providing shelter and food. The maximum reduction is $244.33 If you think that your share of shelter costs and food has a value less than $264.33, then it would be appropriate to appeal. (Purchasing your own food occasionally would not constitute paying for your own food.) Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

      If you are not paying your share now but begin to in the future, you can report the change to Social Security and two months later your benefits will increase.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • J says:

        If I’m getting reduced ssi benefits because I’m not paying rent or food can my dad claim me as a dependent on his taxes or even if my ssi benefits weren’t reduced can he still claim me

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear J.,

          Your father needs to check with a tax accountant or the IRS for an answer to your tax question.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • J says:

            I have one more question. ..how is rent split if there’s 5 people in the house but one adult doesnt earn money and the other person is a baby…is it split 3 ways or 5

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear J.,

            Expenses are split by the number of people in the household regardless of age or lack of income.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  9. Abbey says:

    Hello,

    I am th erepresentative payee for my son. I got a job in 2014 and had to leave it in early 2016. I called and left multiple messgaes with my sons case worker detailing my job and how much I was making per hour and on a monthly basis, and I never heard back from him. I have a print out of all the calls I made. I just assumed that the money I was making didn’t harm the amount of SSI my son recieved as nobody ever called me back.

    I recieved a letter to go for an interview to review my sons case and was askedto bring every pay sub from the job I held…what does this mean? Is there a likely hood that I am going to prison? I genuinley thought it was all ok as nobody returned any of my calls.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Abbey,

      I assume that your son is a minor and receiving Supplemental Security Income. My response is based on that assumption. Either your son’s claim has come up for a routine annual redetermination of financial eligibility or someone is finally processing the work earnings report, but the former seems more likely. Either way, your work earnings may, in fact, not be high enough to affect his benefits. Just attend the appointment, take the pay stubs and also the printout of your reporting calls.

      If you get an overpayment notice, then request waiver of repayment based on the overpayment not being your fault because you believed that your timely reports were being processed and that your earnings were not affecting your son’s payment amount. Re-submit the phone call printouts at that time.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  10. Susan says:

    Hi Kay,
    I hope you’re still answering questions! My situation is, I receive monthly SSI, and have had my parents paying my monthly rent directly to my landlord. However, my mother died last year, and left me some money, which I had diverted directly to a special needs trust in my name (I had a lawyer prepare this). My sister is the trustee. She has the trust pay my rent monthly. But now, SSA wants to know all about the trust, how much is in it, and the details on every disbursement made since it was formed (Sept 2015). They are asking me for this info, but I don’t have access to it directly! Should they even have this data? And who should they be sending letters to–me or the trustee?
    Thanks for any help you can provide.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Susan,

      SSA needs the information about the trust as documentation of how it is set up (kind of trust and specific provisions) and to see that disbursements follow the terms of the trust in order to determine whether the trust is or is not a resource and whether any of the disbursements are income to you. You are responsible for getting the requested documents and information from the trustee and submitting it to SSA.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  11. Thuy says:

    Hi,

    My parents received SSI $1129.54/month and they were out of country for 6 months and they still don’t know when they will come back the United States again due to their health and family problem. When they left the country about one month, I went to SSI office to report that my parents were still out of country and don’t know when they come back to the United State. I wanted them to stop sending the check to my parents’s account, but I was told that they could do anything about it until my parents go back here and show them the proof of travel documents and passport so that they will help them to straight thing out. It sounded not right to me, but if you can help me find out the information how to report to the SSI as my parents’s case?

    Thanks,
    Thuy

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Thuy,

      Your parents’ SSI should have been suspended and the benefits received for months after they left, returned. I suggest that you have your parents go to an American Embassy to request an embassy-certified photocopy of their passports that shows the date they left the U.S. They should also write a statement that they are appointing you as their representative for Social Security business and that they do not know when they will return to the U.S. If needed for your to make refund, they can appoint you power of attorney on their bank account.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  12. Kim Martin says:

    I’m on SSI and I got a $1,000 Visa Gift Card. I don’t have to pay taxes on this. Do I have to report it to SSI?

    Kim

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kim,

      The gift of $1,000 is countable income for determining Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment amount. You need to report the gift. If you are receiving SSI as an individual, that is, you are not married with both you and your spouse receiving SSI, you will be ineligible for benefits the month you received it and you will be overpaid the SSI you received for that month.

      If the person who gave you the card had, instead, paid directly to the store for things that you need or want that are not food or shelter costs, the direct purchases would not have been countable income.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Kim Martin says:

        What do you mean that I will be overpaid the SSI I received for that month?

        It’s just me. I don’t have a spouse.

        Will I have to give it all to SSI?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Kim,

          If you were part of an SSI-eligible couple, the $1,000 gift would cause your and your spouse’s SSI for the monthyou received the gift to go down to $75 each ($1,100 couple rate, less $980 countable income = $120 / 2 people = $60. You say that you are not a member of a couple, so $980 countable income makes you ineligible for SSI. You will be asked to repay the amount of SSI paid to you for that month.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Kim Martin says:

            Sorry, I still don’t understand. Will I have to pay SSI $1,000?

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Kim,

            You will only have to repay the amount of SSI you were paid that month, not the whole $1,000.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  13. ali khan says:

    my wife was on ssi before marrige to me she is disable no after my income ssi is asking her for over payment what should we do they ask for all my information and who is responsible for me or my wife

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ali,

      To determine whether she is eligible for any continuing benefits, you need to provide your Social Security number and proof of your income and assets. Your wife is responsible for repayment of the overpayment; but if she has requested waiver of collection of the overpayment, information about family income must be presented for her request to be evaluated.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  14. Tegan says:

    Hello, I receive SSI at the full 733.00 per month and I was looking into getting a part time job as the cost of living here is fairly expensive, even for a single person living on their own. I know you should not go above the 2,000 limit in your account but I wasn’t sure how much I could make a month working without stunting my income as is.

    I was wondering how much I could make a month and what SSI would say if I got a job in my area. I am mentally disabled, been in the rehab hospital 4+ times because of it and I’m too scared to try and work because I feel like it’s going to affect the monthly income I already have.

    Thank you very much and I hope to hear from you soon.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tegan,

      The first sixty-five dollars (eight-five if you have no other income) gross wages does not affect your SSI benefit. There is a one-dollar reduction for every two dollars you earn above sixty-five (or eighty-five).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  15. Srey says:

    Hi.I did’t not know I have to report to them,honestly that count as income to.Should I report to them that 2014,2015 and 2016 I took out save as cash on hand .please give advice .I have to let them know on my statement. thank you srey

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Srey,

      Please see my response to your first post. You need to report the existence of the accounts, their current balances, and the fact that you made withdrawals. It would be good to explain why you realized you needed to report them now when you have not reported them before. As noted in my previous response, the withdrawals may not be income, but the money available in the accounts are resources that count toward the $2,000 asset limit. If you report now that you are aware of the need to, you will not be in legal trouble. As an aside, I recommend keeping a copy of all the statements and documents that you submit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Srey says:

        Hi!Kay It my daughter that get ssi,not me she austic.Her case worker send me this blank statement paper and she wrote on it spend down.I have to send it back to her.what should I write on it ? Should I write that money I took out 2014,2015 and 2016 save as cash on hand in case emergency. please tell me what to do?I don’t know what to write.I need help please.and what statement and doucoment I save it as cash account.i don’t have bank account.Should I open account?if they need proof what should I tell them.? Should I write a statement tell them stateded I keep it as cash on hand or cash account if they need prove? Please give example.thank you srey

        • Srey says:

          Hi,Kay what if I told them I did’nt realized that I have to report it and until I already done with my review.a couple weeks later she call me back and ask me. It my responsibly to report honestly I did’nt realized until she call me back and ask me that.for three years I did’nt know that count as asset.Would I get legal trouble?Is it to late now.I am very scare to go to persion.srey

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Srey,

            It is very unlikely that you will be prosecuted, so I don’t think you have to worry about being sent to prison. You will be asked to repay the overpayment.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Srey,

          Write the truth. If they want some kind of proof, they will tell you what you need to provide. The cash is a countable resource, so the “spend down” advice may be telling you that you need to reduce resources so your daughter will be eligible. Again, you can have $3,000 and your daughter can have $2,000 countable resources, so if if you and she together have more than $5,000, you need to spend some of it on things that are needed. Or, if your daughter is overpaid because of your cash on hand, you could spend down by repaying the overpayment.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

    • shauna says:

      Hi Kay I had a question. My son with a brain tumor just started receiving ssi meanwhile I applied for my autistic daughter and have not received a response. I was just approved by ihss to be the provider of protective services totaling over $2500 monthly and $108 per month to provide medical transport for my son the ssi recipient. How will this ihss impact ssi? It was my understanding that the income is not counted/exempt. I will receive a back pay ihss check of over $10,000. I read on one of the comments here that tax refunds provide 12 months to spend it without impacting ssi. Does the same apply to ihss pay?

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Shauna,

        If the IHSS payment is being made to your son, who in turn pays you, it is excluded for SSI. If it is paid to you, it is treated as work income. A portion of the earnings will be deemed to your daughter (and to your son if he is a minor) but the $2,500 gross work earnings will still allow SSI payment to either or both children. The month you get the $10,000 back pay, both will be ineligible for SSI if they are both minors.

        The nine-month savings exclusion does not apply to IHSS to my knowledge, but you can double- check. You can have $2,000 ($3,000 for two parents or stepparents in the household) in countable resources. The excess is counted toward each disabled child’s $2,000 limit. Once you have used the back pay for living expenses, debts, deferred needs such as dental care, and/or special needs, SSI will start again. No new application is needed if ineligibility is less than twelve months.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  16. Jess says:

    I currently receive SSI. I am over 65 years old. Earlier this month, I received a settlement check for $11,000. It was for a personal injury related to my teeth for bad dental work performed by a dentist. If I use this money for dental services in the same month, do I need to report it to Social Security?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jess,

      You have to report the settlement. You are overpaid all the SSI you received in June and you need to refund the amount it. If you pay out the rest for dental work this month, none of the settlement will be counted as a resource next month. Alternatively, you can keep some of it as long as your total countable assets on the first of July are $2,000 or less ($3,000 or less if you are married and living with your spouse).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  17. Melissa Ortiz says:

    Hello. My ssi payment for June was suspended i went to social security today and fixed the problem they said they sent me mail over and over again which i did not receive my 2yr recertification was up.. So they worker said after the interview which i had today my suspension was lifted.. When will i receive my benifts for this month.. im just worried cause i have to pay my portion of the rent, light,etc.. Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Melissa,

      If the representative did the computer work to reinstate your benefits while you were in the office you should have them within a week. If she still have the computer work to do after you left, it could depend on where you are in a line of backed up work.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Davina says:

      Hi,
      My son is nine years old and he has autism I had SSI for him last year then my husband’s income was too high for SSI benefits. My son is in the Medicaid waiver program with the office for people with developmental disabilities. Therefore he is entitled to Medicaid despite our income. I had to recertify for Medicaid last year and it was a nightmare. They continue to recalculate past SSI payments and tell me that I owe them money. They were also sending me a check for $23 from the state even though I sent them a letter stating that my son is not getting SSI money anymore. Now a year later they finally stopped the $23 because they said I am not getting SSI for my son anymore. Because of this it now activated my sons Medicaid to be recertified again even though I went through this process last year because his SSI check was stopped last year. I called the social security office in my local neighborhood in New York and they said that I should not close my sons SS I case even though our income is too high. They said if I do so I would have to reapply again when he is 18 and it would be more difficult. I want to know if that is true because I am getting tired of their computer system which is sending me money not sending me money recalculating things and causing problems with the Medicaid.
      Thank you,

      Davina

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Davina,

        My understanding is that if your son is financially ineligible for twelve consecutive months, a new claim has to be filed and a new medical decision made. However, it is possible that there is a special rule for disabled minor children that keeps the claim open.

        I suggest that you double-check the information that your son’s claim will stay open (or is even still open) with a supervisor in your local Social Security office. I can say for sure that current medical information will be obtained when your son turns turn eighteen and his father’s income no longer affects his SSI eligibility because he has to be disabled as an adult according to adult criteria.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  18. catherine earl says:

    My husbands brother just died. He was on SSI. The payee tells me it is not SSD but SSI. I know the check for May is owed back to SSA, however, I believe that the remainder that was in the payee account would go to my husband. How long, once the paperwork is filed, would my husband get the proceeds of the payee account

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Catherine,

      Given that your brother-in-law died in May, the May SSI check would be due and would not have to be returned. I suggest that your brother consult with an estate attorney because if no money is due back to Social Security, then probably the Social Security Administration is out of the picture and inheritance laws in your state would apply.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  19. Kym johnson says:

    If I do a medical study and it pays me for transportation etc. Do I have to report it? I want to help research for lupus. It is why I receive SSI.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kym,

      I don’t know how cash reimbursement for gas or mileage would be handled, but I suspect it would be treated as unearned income. Free bus tickets would not be income. I suggest that you talk with the study to find out how the money will be reported to the IRS and then ask Social Security whether it would affect your SSI. You can have $20 a month income that does not count and $65 more if the income is earnings for services performed.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  20. Bob says:

    Our son was receiving SSI. He passed in mid-March. An SSI check was deposited in his account on April 3rd.
    I assume that money needs to be returned to SS. The bank says it is our problem, not theirs. I have read on two different sites, including this one, that the bank should handle it once they are notified.
    So, the questions are, do you think the check from April is to be returned, and if so, should the bank assist in this.
    Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Bob,

      If you were your son’s payee, the account should be set up so you can withdraw the April benefit and refund it to SSA. If you were not, I suggest that you go to Social Security and tell them you have been trying to get the bank to return the money and ask if they can take action on their end to get a reversal of the electronic payment.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  21. Alisha says:

    Do student loan refunds count as resources? My son was recently cut from disability due to me getting student loan money back in the form of a check.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Alisha,

      I do not know what a student loan “refund” is. I am guessing that maybe it was a loan that went to the school and some was left over after tuition and fees were paid, so it was forwarded to your son for other expenses. Whatever the situation, if it is money he borrowed and he has to pay it back, it is a debt not income and should not count as income for Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  22. Shelley Burnett says:

    We had to put my mother in law in a nursing home last year and she receives SS benefits. Upon entry into the nursing home, she made me her financial POA. She was receiving regularly monthly direct deposit payments until last month. SS had suspended her benefits due to an address change, I was not aware that the benefits had been suspended until I checked her account and noticed that the deposit wasn’t made. She had spent the next 2 weeks trying to find out why they had stopped. Once we were told what to do, I immediately went and handled the paperwork through the proper channels. Her SS payment goes to paying for her nursing home bill every month as per Medicaid. My question is, once her account is reinstated, will her April payment be paid as retroactive? The nursing home is working with me and is aware of the situation.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Shelley,

      The benefits will be reinstated retroactively and should be included in the monthly benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  23. joy says:

    Hi, i’m a 54 yr old on ssi for 10 years. my parents are in their 80’s in poor health.my parent’s want me as a POA to handle their estate when they can no longer handle their affairs .My Question is,When they pass on . am i aloud to handle their bank accounts and sale of there home when on ssi. There will be a will ,but they are not going to leave me anything because they do not want me to loose my ssi .the estate is worth about 500.000,but everything will go to my brothers.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Joy,

      You can serve as an agent for your parents with power of attorney while they are alive and as executrix of their will if you are the named executrix and not have it affect your SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • pizzy says:

      If i recieve ssi and i get a stipend from a study i went to do i have to report it and what happens if i dont report it it was for 3300 i didnt know i was getting it and what do i do i gave it to my son to help him with his business he just opened up as a gift could i have kept 2000 and gave them the rest i really need my ssi check every month and im scared they are gonna cut me off what can i do thanks

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Pizzy,

        You do need to report the stipend, which made you ineligible for SSI the month that you received it. You could have used part of it to repay the SSI you received that month and could have kept enough of it to bring you up to but not above $2,000 and spent down the rest to support yourself for a couple months. At least $1,300 of the money you gave away will keep you from being eligible for SSI for at least two months after the month you received it because you could have used it to support yourself instead of expecting SSI to do so during those months. As far as what you can do, perhaps for the months you are ineligible your son can give part of it back to you to cover your expenses.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

        • pizzy says:

          Thank u so i can keep up to 2000 and still receive my check without being ineligible i appreciate ur response u are the best

          • Kay Derochie says:

            You are welcome, Pizzy.

          • pizzy says:

            Hey kay u didnt answer my last question so do i have to report the 2000 and can they make me re apply after the two months i dont get the check or will they automatically give me my check back sorry for all the questions but i need the help

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Pizzy,

            Apparently, you are not finding my prior response. Yes, you have to report the income and you will overpaid in the month you receive it. If you have more than $2,000 on the first of the following month, you will be ineligible that month also because you will over the resource limit. You can report when you drop down to $2,000 and present proof of where you spent the money (part will go to repay the SSI overpayment). You will then be eligible again.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  24. tameka howard says:

    i am a single parent and my under 18 and she get ssi and she is the only income one get income in the house for beside my eighteen year old son who have a parttime job and i finally did my my taxes since 2008 and my refund i suppose to get get back is 5000 and a little change do i suppose to report that to them and if i do let them know will they cut her check off or cut it down cause i only use her income to do my taxes. somebody told me that i suppose to do my taxes every year or i will owe IRS could someone out there please help me and let me know what i should do so i want get in any trouble this my first time doing thing with ssi with taxes. sign worry and scare

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tameka,

      Tax refunds are not income for SSI payment calculation. However, any of the refund that you still have twelve months later will count toward your $2,000 resource (asset) limit on the first of the twelfth month.ts. If your resources go over $2,000 at that time, the excess will count toward your daughter’s $2,000 resource limit.

      To answer your second question: If you do save enough of the money that your daughter is potentially over the limit, you need to report being over the limit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  25. Christine says:

    My 24 year old son, who has been receiving SSI and regular Social Security benefits, began working last May. We went to the Social Security office and told them he was working. The rep didn’t take any info about it from my son, and instead told him he needed to call and give the info. Being as my son is working full time, he is unable to sit on hold, which is why we went in. So we wrote out the information and included the paycheck stubs and sent them in to our local Social Security office, he did receive a form in the mail to complete asking for the same info we supplied previously. We did this for about four months and nothing has ever come of it. He is still working and it has now been 10 months and he is still receiving both payments. He wants to pay this money that he is not entitled to back and have the benefits stop. How can he make this happen? Any help would greatly be appreciated. Thank you, Christine

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Christine,

      It is possible that your son is still eligible for Social Security Disability. If he has not recovered medically, he has probably been eligible during a nine-month Trial Work Period (TWP). During the thirty-six months after the end of the TWP, he can receive full SSDI benefits for any month he does not perform Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA), which in 2016 is usually defined as gross earnings of $1,130 or more. After the thirty-six months, his benefits will be terminated and his claim closed with the first month he performs SGA, but if he has Medicare, it will continue for another fifty-four months. He can read more about these work incentives in the Redbook at http://www.ssa.gov.

      On the other hand, your son may have stopped being eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as soon as he started working. If his Social Security and one half of his earnings above $65 a month come to more than $752.99, he has not been eligible for even one dollar of SSI The only exception would be if he has disability-related work expenses that would bring his countable earnings down to the point he was within the income limits. I suggest that he take a vacation day and go to Social Security with all his pay stubs since last May (again) and the date that he first reported the earnings, by phone, and by mail. He can make a statement asking to have his SSI closed retroactively to the month he got his first work earnings. He can at the same time refund all the SSI benefits he has received since then. Be sure he does this with a check, not cash, and gets a receipt.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  26. Melissa says:

    Hi Kay,

    I’m hoping to receive my benefits soon. It’s been 2 1/2 months since the judge granted me with SSI. My attorney said I would receive an award letter but it still hasn’t come?? My husband passed away last year and I ended up homeless, disabled in a wheelchair. It’s been the absolute worst time in my life. My attorney, who gets 40% of my settlement is no help at all. I leave messages and emails that go unanswered so I call and call to get a sharp tongued answer that turns out to another delay. Anyway, I’m in California and wondering how much longer this should take. I’m sick and sofa surfing is taking its toll on me. Not to mention the stress. My questions are:
    Do you have any idea how much longer this could take until I get any much needed money?
    Once I get the back pay will it count against me if I don’t spend it and want to save some of it? (If anything is left after paying my debts)
    Oops! Just 1 more question. If I loaned someone money and they pay me back does that count against my $733?

    Thank you so much!
    Melissa in California

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Melissa,

      Back SSI benefits are usually paid in three installments after monthly benefits start. I suggest that you go to Social Security and file a statement of dire need to request that monthly benefits be started and that enough of your SSI back pay be released on a dire need basis to cover the cost of moving into an apartment (deposit, first and last) and paying utility deposits and for any basic furniture (bed, table, chair, cooking utensils) you might need. Research the approximate amounts needed so you can be specific. If you have not already had a financial update interview, take any proofs you have of any income, bank accounts, or other assets you’ve had since that time.

      You can have $2,000 in countable resources. One car, a home you live in, a $1,500 term life burial policy with no cash value are excluded. SSI and Social Security back pay begin to be countable resources the first day of the ninth month after they are received. Repayment of a loan is not income for SSI; however, you should get a statement from the person who repaid you to give to Social Security that says when the money was borrowed and when it was repaid.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  27. Derek Hill says:

    Is SSI eligibility affected if funds from a credit card offer are put into the bank exclusively to pay bills and these funds cause the balance to go over $2,000 until the checks for the bills are cashed by the billers?

    I’m trying to understand the definition of “resources,” which is, according to SSI information I found on its website, “anything that can be turned into cash.”

    No offense or disrespect intended, but I’m sure there are ways to turn a kidney into cash and I don’t think that counts against me; in the situation I described, the money represents debt moving from one place to another; available credit on a credit card could be turned into cash, but this isn’t counted either (as far as I can tell), presumably because the cost of that money is so high that there’s no way to use it and not end up in worse shape.

    The intent, if it matters, is to make medical bills that I struggle to pay down easier for me to manage by moving the debt to one place and temporarily saving on interest charges.

    Thank you for your time.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Derek,

      The money you take off a credit card is a loan and not income. Any of that money that you carry over to the following month does count toward the SSI resource limit. Accordingly, it might be good to buy cashiers checks and deliver the payments to the creditors immediately in the same month as you take money off a credit card, so that no outstanding checks make you go over the limit. That way, you won’t have to try to prove the money was “gone” when personal checks are slow to be cashed.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  28. Erwin says:

    Hello, We have been receiving the full$700 plus amount for the last 7 years until our recent reporting. Not only did they reduce my 25 year old sons monthly, but they are also applying an overpayment since 2014. Is there a way to avoid being deducted just because he is leaving with us?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Erwin,

      Your son has to pay his share of shelter expenses and food or his share of shelter expenses and buy his own food. His share is the total amount of these expenses divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are rent or mortgage, property tax, and if required by the lender property insurance, power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage. Alternatively, he would have to be a renter renting a room from you for fair market value and buying his own food or a boarder paying fair market value for room and board. The last choice is harder to prove with a family member.

      My question is did something change in 2014 that caused your son to be overpaid beginning then? Did his contribution to expenses go down or the expenses go up? In other words, why did start to get overpaid in certain month in 2014 or did SSA just go back to the last redetermination. If they went back to the last redetermination and your son’s share went up without an increase in contribution from him, it is possible that the share increased in some month later than the last redetermination. You might go back month by month and figure the total expenses and his share for every overpaid month to see if the overpayment started later than they said and is less than they said. If so, you can appeal. (You will need your utility bills from all months to do this.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  29. Summer says:

    I receive SSI for my daughter who was born with a cyanotic heart condition. She was to have a redetermination hearing on March 16 2016. I waited all day for the telephone call but never received it. I did not know who to contact regarding her review. I received a letter saying payments are suspended due to inaccurate info. I called to update and was told the suspension was lifted and I would receive a letter. I never got any letter for the suspension or the review as to why I didnt get a call that day. Her payment didnt come today April 1st and when I contact they say its because shes in suspension for the missed review. I waited all day for a call I did not receive and was told who to contact. What happens now? I am on SSI myself and need that payment for housing expenses and to care for her. Also her insurance was stopped as well so I am not able to take her to her much needed next echo due to this. What happens now???

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Summer,

      If you can get to a Social Security office, go there to file an appeal on the suspension. If you cannot, call the local office if you have a number or 1-800-772-1213 and explain the situation and ask to start the appeals process by mail and/or phone. The basis of the appeal is that checks should not have been suspended because you were not called on the appointed date. When you appeal, also ask to have the Medicaid approved retroactively to April 1.

      (For future reference,if something like this happens again, I suggest that you don’t wait till the check doesn’t come to contact Social Security. The sooner you address an issue, the better chance of not having benefits interrupted.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Justin says:

        Hello, im on SSI and i moved from NY to Utah into my cousins home with his girlfriend and his 5 children a few months ago. 2 months ago in February I received a letter from SSA stating that I was receiving income from someone in the household and my payment of $733 was lowered to $489 a month. Im paying half the cost of rent @ $500, utilities @ $125, and water @ $60-$75 a month and also preparing meals myself with no help from anyone and not receiving foodstamps or any other type of benefits. Thus leaving me with $30-$40 a month for food and im practically practically starving. How do i get my benefits back to where they were previously?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Justin,

          You need to appeal the determination right away. If you are paying one-sixth of the total shelter costs, your benefit should not have been reduced. For the appeal, you will need a statement from your cousin that lists the people in the household, your contribution for shelter expenses, and the fact that you prepare your meals separately. You will also need to submit a copy of the rental agreement your cousin has with his landlord and a copy of the power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage bills. The documents are needed to calculate your share.

          A couple notes: If you have not applied for New York SSI state supplement, ask the local office how to do that–at Social Security or in a state office. Also, you may be eligible for SNAP (formerly called food stamps.)

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  30. April says:

    Hello, my dad receives SSI due to his being elderly and indigent. He is a Gardener (has been for over 35 years) and continues to work because he has no possible way to retire. His income fluctuates from year to year but not by much. Do we have to make an appointment to provide his taxes every year since he likely has a “change” in income? It’s never a change greater than a few hundred dollars or so. He is always below the poverty line and his income never fluctuates more than a few hundred dollars. Please let me know! Thank you so much!

    • April says:

      Additional information: my dad allows the SSI access to his checking account so they can see the checks he deposits from customers and his account activity on a monthly basis. Wondering if he needs to provide them with a copy of his taxes every year. We live in California.

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear April,

        I am not familiar with the bank access you describe. Please see my response to your first post.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear April,

      If your father is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), he is supposed to report wages every month or self-employment changes at whatever point in the year he can see he will earn more than the prior year and once a year after he has prepared his self-employment tax return.

      If he is receiving Social Security Retirement and has been at full retirement age all year, he does not have to report his work earnings at all. He can earn any amount. If he is not yet at full retirement age, he is required to report his earnings annually. The current limit for earnings is $15,720 gross wages or net self-employment. Every $2.00 earnings above that amount result in a $1.00 reduction in annual benefits. You will find a chart with normal retirement ages below.

      Year of birth Age
      1937 and prior 65
      1938 65 and 2 months
      1939 65 and 4 months
      1940 65 and 6 months
      1941 65 and 8 months
      1942 65 and 10 months
      1943-54 66
      1955 66 and 2 months
      1956 66 and 4 months
      1957 66 and 6 months
      1958 66 and 8 months
      1959 66 and 10 months
      1960 and later 67

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  31. lisa alcott says:

    i receive ssi, my 4 yr old grandson lives with me , it’s just us two i recently got full custody and he’s about to be approved for ssi because he has been diagnosed with autism, i get the full 733.00 a month for myself to support us which is not close enough to pay all our bills. question is when he’s approved will he also get 733.00 or will they lower his because of mine. i hope not because his would help with getting him more help for his autism

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lisa,

      Your income does not affect your grandson’s SSI payment amount. However, if he is getting free food and/or housing from you, then his SSI will be reduced by about $245 a month. Once he is approved, if you use his monthly benefits and back pay to pay his share (one-half) of the shelter and food costs, his SSI will increase to the maximum of $733.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Michelle Dorsey says:

        My child only gets 30dollars a month and she has been out the nicu for over a year now is she still suppose to get only 30dollars

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Michelle,

          If your child is living at home with you, you need request a redetermination of her payment amount by reporting to Social Security the date she came home. As proof give them a copy of the hospital discharge papers. If possible, do this in person at the Social Security office.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Michelle Dorsey says:

            What do I say to them when I go up there

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Michelle,

            Tell them that you want your child’s SSI benefit to be recalculated because the child is now home and no longer in the hospital. Take proof of the discharge date.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

      • lisa alcott says:

        THANK-YOU SO VERY MUCH KAY I APPRECIATE THE INFORMATION, THIS WILL HELP US OUT IN SO MANY WAYS, WE WE’RE HARDLY EVEN MAKING ENDS MEET, IM BEHIND IN UTILITIES AND RENT AS WE SPEAK, SO YOU THINK I SHOULD TELL SSI WHEN I GO IN TO FIGURE OUT HIS AMOUNT THAT HIS BACK PAY IS GOING TOWARDS RENT AND FOOD AND CLOTHING IS THAT CORRECT?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Lisa,

          The expenses that your son needs to pay and you need to report as his paying them with his back pay are shelter and food expenses, not clothing. Although some of his funds will be used for his clothing needs, the key issue is whether his is paying his share of household shelter and food, as explained in my previous response.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

    • Sharon says:

      I get Ssi for 3 of my autistic kids n I was in scar accident does the 5500 I received need to b reported for pain n suffering I got 4,000 my daughter got 3,000 n I paid 1500 for chiropractor do I need to claim that As incine

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Sharon,

        You need to report your insurance settlements to Social Security so they can recalculate all the children’s benefits for the month of receipt and to evaluate whether any of the children were over the resource limit the following month.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  32. Sergei says:

    Do I need report to Social Security Administration about my credit cards while I am receiving Social Security benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sergei,

      You do not need to report loans that you take out including credit card loans; however, if you use them for housing or food and someone else pays back the money, their payment might reduce your SSI benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  33. Karen L Spears says:

    I have been approved for sad and have received my 1st back pay installment which was very little due to me being married and living together..I was wondering if I could get mine in a lump sum to do house repairs and vehicle repairs and get insurance for my vehicle for the year and my household stuff..can I get my back pay early if so how do I go about it..thankyou

    • Karen L Spears says:

      Social security disability benefits I mnt..not sad

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Karen,

      If your back pay was $2,199 you may be eligible for more back pay. If it was less than that, then you have probably received the full back pay. If you are eligible for more, write up an itemized statement of the cost of the house repairs and car repairs and car insurance and make a written request for release of the funds. If you need the car to get to medical appointments say that and if there any health hazards due to needed house repairs mention those.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  34. Jenally says:

    Hello my son gets ssi and I no longer want ssi for him how can I stop that. And also I am looking into being incorporateed into a business and before I start that I would like to stop ssi how can I do it or what are the steps that I should take please and thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jenally,

      Go to your Social Security office and ask to terminate your son’s benefits. The request should be made in writing and specify the last day for which you want benefits paid, for example, March 31, 2016.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Red says:

        To terminate-
        What documents will SSA/i…require from my home?
        I just completed a re determination for my son and he is still disabled. All they checked was medical, which raised concerns for me so I began research here recently.
        But, after getting ssi for 6 years, I just learned my boyfriends income is counted as my son’s because we live with my spouse.
        Originally it was all based on my oldest 3 children’s childsupport.
        Which I didn’t realize monthly reporting of it and everything was necessary as the only times the contact me is the survey for what the deposit is spent on and recently the health status review

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Red,

          Your son’s SSI is based on the income and assets of any parents and stepparents living in the same household. Your boyfriend’s income would not be considered unless he is the disabled child’s father. It is also based on how many other minor children the parents/stepparents are supporting and how much income those children have. Lastly, your disabled child’s income is considered as well. Income includes in-kind (non-cash) income in the form of free or subsidized housing. Such in-kind income is received when someone other than the parents/parents are paying for shelter expenses or food for the disabled person. This can happen if someone is the household pays more than his or her share or someone outside the household pays the shelter or food expenses. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance. All changes in family income and living arrangements (who lives in house and who pays shelter and food costs) and assets above the limits must be reported when the changes occur.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  35. Jeanine says:

    My son started receiving ssi when he was 18 due to his disability of autism. He is now 24. Since we are a family of 4 social security divided the $900.00 dollar monthly mortgage by 4 people which is $225.00. My mortgage payment has fluctuated either due to escrow shortage and also because we refinanced. I recently applied for ssi for my younger autistic son who just turned 18. My current mortgage payment is $860.00 per month.I don’t know what to tell social security when they ask me my monthly mortgage? I couldn’t find anything saying if change in mortgage amount needs to be reported. Would I have to owe money back to social security? Or would other factors such as increase in utility cost make up for the difference?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jeanine,

      Social Security requires you to report changes in living arrangements. Living arrangements includes whether or not your son, who is eligible for SSI, pays his share of those costs. You need to report between reviews any month he does not pay his share. If the mortgage and property tax (and property insurance if required by the lender) go up and down, he needs to pay his share (one-fourth) of what the amount is that month. The same is true of the utilities. In the review, provide the information asked for, that is, if they ask for the amounts now, list the amounts now. If they ask for the average or total for the last twelve months provide that. If you’ve used the same amount of your son’s benefits every month, list that. If the amount has varied but has always been at least one-quarter, then state that. In summary, as long as he has paid his share, variations in expenses don’t affect benefits and don’t have to be reported.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • yaneth says:

        So I just had my son’s recertification interview and apparently I’m in trouble for not reporting that I got another car, I told the interviewer the other one I have is not working and i can’t even sell it because for me it is worthless, but i got another car last year for 4000, so is there a change of an overpayment?
        also, does it matter if me and my son now have two life insurances? i got one a long time ago, and my work offers another one, and again, I was scolded for not reporting that, but again, is there a limit to the life insurance amount? i cant even cash any unless im nearly death and just a portion. also Since my income got higher, my son’s SSI decreased and the amount I use for rent from that is just $100, before it was $300 , because he used to get more but i now mostly use his SSI for child care. Am i going to get penalized for that too? does the rent amount also affect his SSI?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Yaneth,

          Your increased earnings affect your son’s SSI payments. If he lives only with his parents and minor siblings, then his contributing less to the rent will not affect his benefit.

          You have a $2,000 resource limit ($3,000 if you are married and you live with your spouse or the child’s father lives in the household) and your son has a $2,000 limit. The more valuable car will be excluded. The value of the that doesn’t run will count toward your resource limit. If it can be sold only for junk, that won’t be much.

          Depending on the type of insurance one policy may be excluded for each of you and the value of the other will be counted. Whether the face value or cash value counts depends on the type of insurance. If your countable resources exceed you limit, the excess will be counted toward your son’s limit. As long as he is under the limit, what you own will not disqualify him.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Toria says:

            Hi good evening. My daughter currently on ssi benefits receiving $30 a month because she still in the nicu. It’s been 5mths now she coming out june/July. My question is on my original form I stated I’m living with my grand MA and she pay bills n my food stamp buy food. Is it best to stick with that story even thou I pay her, 300 for rent. I trying see what to say n do since I need the full maximum bcuz I wud stop work to take care of her.

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Toria,

            You need to tell the truth rather than trying to figure out what to say.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  36. Deanna says:

    I’m so frustrated. My son has gotten SSI of a few hundred since last year based on our income. In June, he had surgery to reverse his osteomy. I called in July to report–I’m not sure how they determine at what point he is no longer disabled. When he had the surgery? When we stopped followups with the NICU in December? I was told in July they would send me forms to have it redetermined, which is what I thought should happen. Never got them. Called each month after that and kept being told they would send out the forms which I never got. I finally called asking to talk to a caseworker, who told me his review is in March. Basically said they wouldn’t reevaluate it until then? It doesn’t seem right that I continually report the changes and nothing is done about it. I refuse to spend the checks-I cannot afford a huge overpayment. They told me it was good for a year. Do you have any suggestions? I’m at my wits end.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Deanna,

      I think you are saying that your son has recovered from his illness and is able to lead a more-or-less normal life of a child his age. If that is the case, you were right to notify social Security; however, you need a date of recovery to report. I suggest that you discuss with your son’s physician when your son was recovered enough that he was no longer disabled by his illness and report that date at the March review.

      The representative you talked to should have taken the report of improvement in health and started a continuing disability review earlier than the apparent one-year review date that was set when you son was approved. At this point the review is coming up soon, so you might as well wait for that. You are wise in not cashing the checks, and I suggest holding onto them until you get a written decision on when your son’s benefits end. Then you will know if any were due to him.

      Note that the definition of disability for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) includes the requirement of being disabled for at least twelve months. If your son has recovered in less than twelve months from when the disability began (not necessarily twelve months from when SSI began), then he would not be eligible for SSI at all and would be ineligible for all benefits paid. That is why it is important to get a medical opinion from his doctor regarding if and when your son recovered to the point of normal health and function. If it turns out that he was not eligible at all and you get a written notification as such and notification of overpayement–which will come in two different letters–you can return the uncashed checks and apply for waiver of repayment of the earlier payments based on the overpayment not being your fault (you couldn’t know that your child would not be disabled for a year and you tried to report improved health) and not being able to repay if that is true.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Deanna says:

        I honestly appreciate your quick and informative response. I felt like I was getting no answer from them that was clear. I guess I don’t really understand how they determine him no longer disabled. We went through the NICU for nearly all his treatments and he was considered disabled from birth. We have been fortunate that he was released from followups in December, one year later. I’m not sure which physician to ask–we’ve gone through several. I sincerely appreciate your help!

  37. kim says:

    If u have a baby do u have to report that or do they know that already by ss numbers. If not reported what can happen

    • kim says:

      If u are disabled but have a payee and u have a baby can they take your child away

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Kim,

        I am not an expert of children’s services guidelines; but I would think that if you take good care of the baby, there would be no reason to remove the baby from your care. If the baby is eligible for SSI or Social Security dependent benefits, your current payee would be payee for the baby, too, to handle the baby’s money.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kim,

      If you are receiving Social Security Disability on your own earnings record, I recommend reporting the child’s birth because the child may be eligible for Social Security dependent benefits.

      If you receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you are required to report when anyone moves in or out of your dwelling, so you should report the birth. If your SSI was reduced for not paying your share of the home’s shelter and/or food expenses, the addition of a member of the household could mean you are eligible for more SSI because your share decreased with more people in the home.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  38. Jasmine says:

    I am trying to leave a company due to them stressing me out and not giving my money for things I need. is there a right way to do it.. I want my grandmother to be payee is there a way to change that. I just got my back pay.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jasmine,

      I suggest that you and your grandmother go to your local Social Security office together for her to apply to be your payee and for you to explain why you want a change of payee.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  39. Ciera says:

    I was kicked out of my parents house after I turned 18 , I just recently found out that I receive SSI I think it’s for my dyslexia?? .. I was able to become my own payee but I received a letter in the mail stating I needed to schedule an appointment with a doctor, does that mean they are trying to stop my benefits ?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ciera,

      All minor-child SSI recipients have to be reevaluated under adult disability criteria when they turn age eighteen, so the request for an examination is routine. If you have any of your medical or educational documentation from your doctors or any educational institutions, you should submit it to support your claim. Your benefits will continue if you are disabled by adult criteria.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  40. Kes says:

    Hello kay,
    I have what I believe is a unique situation. My husband was on ssi for years because his mother out him on it when he was young. Well he received it up until 2013 when we got married and he got a job. Well I just discovered that when he went to prison in 2009 that he never reported to ask that he was incarcerated. His mother continued to spend his ssi on her rent and utilities. He was living with her but was an adult by then. Now he has an owing balance of almost $5000. Is this fraud?

    Thank you
    Kes

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kes,

      Your husband can request waiver of repayment based on the grounds that he was not at fault and cannot afford to repay. He can claim not being at fault because he, at the time, was deemed incapable and had a payee. He will have to provide financial information to prove that he can’t afford to repay. The government will determine whether his mother was fraudulent or just made mistake in using his funds thinking she should maintain a home for him to come back to.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  41. Jason says:

    Hi Kay, thanks for your great info and responses to comments. I have a question I haven’t been able to find info on elsewhere. What if an SSI recipient is supposed to be paying rent, but has a lenient landlord who lets this tenant get behind on rent for a few months while they take care of medical expenses? Now, this rent (“back-rent”) money is still owed, and the tenant signs a promissory note that they commit to paying this accrued debt, and meanwhile goes back to paying current monthly rents when due.

    The tenant fails to report this situation in a timely manner, but then has a review of finances and is found to have not paid rent as originally stated. How is SSI supposed to view this leniency on rent, in light of the promissory note? It’s not exactly “income” (“value of food or shelter”) if it’s still owed, right? Or in the eyes of the SSA, does the promissory note mean nothing, since the rent wasn’t paid during the month it was due?

    Of course, if it’s the latter, an overpayment has been made. But if it’s the former, that shouldn’t be considered an overpayment, right?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jason,

      If the person is in a commercial rental situation with a rental agreement and there is a written agreement to pay the back rent (promissory note), it should be treated as a loan. However, if a long time has passed and the SSI recipient hasn’t made any payments on the debt, it does raise a question of whether the non-collected rent was a bonafide loan or free rent from the landlord. The situation becomes even more questionable as a loan if the landlord is a relative or friend.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  42. leeda javaheri says:

    Hi Kay,

    Im in my late 30s and suffer from severe psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis and am unable to work. I have ran thru my savings and have no medical insurance, no source of income. How do i go about applying for disability would i qualify for SS disability.
    kindly,
    leeda

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Leeda,

      If you have enough work credits with at least twenty of the credits in the last ten years before you became disabled, you may qualify for Social Security benefits.I suggest that you read the articles under the “Apply for SSD” tab on the navigation bar of this website for information about filing a claim. You can also apply for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) based on no income and low resources. If you have lost medical insurance within the last sixty days, you can apply for coverage through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) at http://www.healthcare.gov. You might also contact your local social services department to apply for SNAP (food stamps) and to see if you qualify for Medicaid or other assistance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  43. Deanna Davis says:

    I receive disability and ssi, and my minor child also receives ssi. Do I have to call in my payments to the wage reporting line, since he gets ssi as well? I have no other income. Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Deanna,

      You only have to call in work earnings to the wage reporting line. If you have not reported your Social Security Income for your child’s SSI claim, you should report it by going to the office. While there find out how/whether your Social Security counts both in the calculation of your claim and your child’s or just yours given that you are SSI eligible.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  44. Allal says:

    Can the person receiving SSI have a safe deposit box? Does this person need to report it?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Allal,

      A person receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) can have a safe deposit box. The box itself does not have to be reported because it is just a box. If cash, stocks, bonds, or other financial instruments or other valuables are stored in the box, those things have to be reported and counted toward the SSI resource limit. (Some life insurance policies do not count but should be reported.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  45. Kstump says:

    Hello my wife takes care of my brother in laws social security check. A few days ago he was diagnosed with stage four lung cancer and local fire department wants to have a benefit dinner for him to help with trips to the doctor dose she have to report what the department raise for him .And how much can he get before it affects his check ?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ken,

      If your brother-in-law is receiving Social Security and not Supplemental Security Income (SSI), nothing has to be reported and the funds raised can be handled in any manner.

      If he receives Supplemental Security Income (SSI), it would be advisable to have the fire department set up a restricted account that someone other than your brother-in-law controls and that is not in your brother-in-law’s name, so that the medical bills can be paid directly to the medical provider and not affect his benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Jane says:

      Urgent question. I was approved for ssi feb 2015. Started receiving payments nov 2015. The award letter said I was not up for review for 3 years. Jan 2016 I just received a letter stating I need to come into office before feb 2 or my ssi could stop. I reported address change last month and asked for increase due to I am now renting. Would they be calling me into the office to discuss this? I’m confused.

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Jane,

        The three-year review refers to a medical review. SSI requires financial reviews yearly and more often if you have a change in living arrangements or income or assets. Be sure to go in for the review.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  46. nabi says:

    If other parent n i went into notarized stipulations to be a order of the court, but the courts reject the stipulations and demands that a modification hearing be filed before such modifications can be considered by court, and other parent n i are now not in agreement n ssi beneficiary is back with me, can ssi not give me benefits for two months for beneficiary n use rejected stipulations by courts against me to not be payee?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Nabi,

      Social Security does not go by court custody rulings; however, they usually pay benefits to the person who has physical custody of the beneficiary. Accordingly, you can apply to be payee for the time the beneficiary is with you.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Jake Kim says:

        Hi Kay. My mother and fathet both receive SSI and SSA. My mom receives SSI and SSA combined $590 month. Due to my (son) poor credit, the car dealer asked me to put a new car under my mom’s name since my mom’s credit qualified. The car is $20000 and we got this financed to 60 months. Im (son) making payments to this new car purchased under my mom’s name. Will this decrease her SSI benefit?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Jake,

          If your mother and father have another vehicle, the equity value of the less valuable car will count toward their SSI resource limit of $3,000. If they go over the limit, neither will be eligible for SSI. The equity value is the retail value less the amount owed on it. Be sure you make the payments directly and don’t give her money to make the payments.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Jake Kim says:

            Dear Kay. Thank you for your information. I forgot it clarify that this is their first vehicle. So, as long as this is their first vehicle, it won’t affect their benefits. Also, after getting a car under my mom’s name, how soon does my mom have to report to Social Security office?

            Best.
            Jake Kim

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Jake,

            Your mother can report it at her next financial redetermination.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  47. dear kay as a last resort ive contacted you ive been on disabilty for 4 years during that time my ex wife had taken 1650.00 dollars from my 2500 dollar check.She also gets a seperate check strictly for my 3 kids so that would offset my payments because ssi is my only income. she also rents the marital residence for 2800.00dollars, i end up with 827.00 dollars which after my medical exspences comes out to 600.oo to make things worse they (child support) put 1000,00 dollars on arrears each month.I have contacted them 20 times to ask why and got no responce and because i cant afford a lawyer my ex wife willfully continues her aactivitys. i stay in a trailer in my brothers backyard that has no heat or running water, i have no car anymore i live in constant pain due to my bone disease .I will not make another winter with my blood pressure at 188/87 .I dont want to die i miss my kids im hungry and cold and no one cares . today is a bad day ive got bad chest pains and am dizzy. Ive counted all my pennys and i can get a frozen pizza from 7 eleven.Some days i really dont know why i even wake up. I know you will probably tell me theres nothing you can do so im thanking you for at least reading this. darren ullger 34 pirates cove massapequa ny (my brothers adrsress).Please kay all i want is my hard earned disabilty so i can be warm and maybe not always hungry, im a good dad and my kids love me. snd her name is staci ullger her real last name is grieco she got remarried 3 years ago and my kids ar 22 21 and 16.Im shacking when im typing this is there anyone who can help me ,so tired of her putting me down in front of other people about my thrift store clothes and me being dirty and poor how dare her thanks for listening

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Darren,

      I suggest you go into the child-support office, not just call. If that doesn’t work, contact your local bar association to find out whether you can get free legal help to go back to court and have the support order reduced for the sixteen-year-old because Social Security is being paid. If you can’t get legal help, contact any local organization that advocates for the disabled to see if they have a social worker who could help you file with the court. Tell the child-support office (or court if necessary) your living conditions because of lack of income. Ask the court to reduce child support arrears collection to a lower amount, such as $500. If you haven’t already, apply for SNAP (food stamps). You might also consider renting a room in house that has heat and water, which you might be able to do on the amount of income you now have.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  48. matt says:

    hey kay i am currently on ssdi and ssi for disabliltys and i just bought a 1000 dollar car will that go against me for ssdi or ssi

  49. Josie says:

    Hello Kay I have a question I get ssi for 2 kids.I came from another state. I was a single parent my baby’s dad got deported back in 2012 is there gonna be a problem if his back and living with us will they take my benefits away even if we are both unemployed?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Josie,

      As long as your report any income you and the children’s father have in the future, there is no problem with his being in the household. Currently he has no income and low earnings will not make the children ineligible or reduce their benefits but must be reported.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  50. Joan says:

    I am currently 18 years old , recently turned. I found out from a source that I was apparently receiving benefits with my mom as a payee but I never knew anything about it because my mom always told me it was off. I called in and it turns out I am still receiving these benefits, so my question is how do I recieve these checks on my name or in other words how do I start receiving them without my mom as a payee so that I can get the checks directly to my name without her knowing? Please help I would appreciate it!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Joan,

      You can go to a Social Security office and file to be your own payee. Your mother will be notified that the payee has been changed. Note that if you are receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for a disability and you live with other people including relatives, in order to receive the maximum benefit, you must pay your share of housing and food expenses or buy your own food and pay market rate for a room.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  51. Jennifer Morrison says:

    My son has been on SSI since 2011 and gets 488 a month. He is now 23 and I am looking into having him pay rent to us. He has autism, cannot work, and is considered completely and totally disabled. I can’t get a hold of local SSA office, so I heard that I should just drop off a lease agreement between me and him saying what he is paying in rent. He does not have a representative payee.but I help him with it to make it easier, and keep monthly notes of what is spent. Our mortgage is paid off, so do I look at rents in the area and take the average to come up with a mortgage payment, or do I just use our utilities and food costs and not use a mortgage payment? What if that makes it come up to less than 488? He also has a lot of medical/prescription drug copays and personal care items and that kind of stuff. Also, I am a joint owner of his bank account to that he doesn’t have to pay the service charge. Would that have to change if he starts paying rent? If he writes a check to me for the rent, should the check also include prescription copays and things I pay for him as I am the one picking up the medicine. Do I need to keep records of what HE eats, or for all of us (me, my husband, and my daughter, who is currently away at college but still lives with us) or just the total amount of grocery, utilities, and divide by four?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jennifer,

      You can either treat your son as a roomer and boarder and charge a flat fee for room and board or treat him as a member of the household If you go with roomer/boarder, you would charge fair market value for the room portion by researching the cost of room rentals in the area. Fair market value for board is harder to research or prove because in today’s world, very few people run commercial boarding houses. So, you would need to decide a a figure for food that would be what you would charge a stranger. If you treat him as a member of the household, then for him to receive an increase he would need to pay his share of the shelter utilities (not cable or phone) and his share of food. Usually, a child away at school is considered part of the household if the child comes home during term breaks and summer, so his share would be one quarter of those costs. If you charge him either FMV room and board or his share as a member of the household and his share $286 or less, his SSI will increase to $733 two months later. (If his share is more than he can pay, then his SSI might go up, but not to the maximum.

      He should write you a check from his account to pay for the food and housing. Any reimbursement he gives you for shopping for him should be done separately. Also, be sure you do not put any of your money into the joint account as it would count as income. The records you need to keep if he is a roomer/boarder are copies of the checks. Records for sharing in household expenses are the utility bills for the whole household. (Initially, you may have to present proof that there’s no mortgage by showing the deed to the house.) Typically, you don’t have to prove food costs, but it wouldn’t hurt to keep copies of the grocery receipts. (Group your household food purchases separately from non-grocery items at the store and ask to have them rung up separately.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Jennifer Morrison says:

        Thanks for answering! So since we have paid off the mortgage, I’m thinking that charging him his share of food and utilities would be best. But did you mean that his share as a member of the household has to be $286 or less to have the full $733 benefit? And do I need to go to the social security office to set this up specifically as a member of the household?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Jennifer,

          Your son has to pay within $20 of his share to get the full amount. If he increases his contribution but it he doesn’t pay his share, all but $20 of the difference between his share and what he is paying is countable income and will be subtracted from $733; however, no more than $266 will be counted. So, if the difference between what he pays and his share is more than $286, the reduction will be capped at $266. Hopefully, this explanation will be clearer for you.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  52. aleathea says:

    hello i recently recieved a back paymrnt of 1672 in september it was for my son he is autistic…i am worried that i will have a problem cause i bought a used car for me to get him around and to appts plus where we live its far to the store…in the long run the car ended up not working now i dont know what to do…all i want to know will i have a problem with ssi???

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Aleathea,

      Because you bought the car to provide your son with transportation to medical appointments, you may not have a problem as his payee even though the car is not in his name.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  53. Linda says:

    I receive SSI at the full 733.00 per month. I am also in the middle of an SSDI appeal.
    If I try to supplement this with any income that will be less than 300.00 and no more than 400.00 per month, do I have to report this to the SSA? I’m not understanding the legalities of all of this, so layman’s terms would be appreciated.
    I do not want to do anything wrong, but 733.00 is not a lot to live on. I would be working very part time for myself, not an employer but do not want to be penalized for this.
    Please advise.
    Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Linda,

      You do need to report your work to Social Security.

      If you have a $400 monthly profit from your self-employment, part of your work earnings will affect the amount of your Supplemental Security Income (SSI). It will be decreased by $167.50. (The first $85 does not count nor does half of the excess.) “Very part-time” self-employment will not be considered substantial gainful activity (SGA), so it should not affect your disability standing for SSI.

      The situation with the Social Security appeal is a little more complicated. If you have an attorney, discuss the matter with the attorney. The work should not directly cause ineligibility because it is not SGA; however, it could color the claims examiner’s or judge’s thinking by raising questions about whether you are as medically impaired as you say. That said, you are probably trying to prove in the appeal that you were disabled at time in the past when you were still insured, so a small amount of work now may not affect that issue. Again, if you have an attorney for the appeal, seek his or her advice.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Linda says:

        Thank you, Kay

        • Kay Derochie says:

          You are welcome, Linda.

          • Victor Jacot says:

            Hi! Kay, I’ve been receiving SSDI benefits since 2011 and SSI for my oldest son but I also have another son that is 5 years younger than my older son that was supposed to be receiving benefits? Is it possible to attain additional SSI check for my youngest son?

            Sincerely,
            _Vie_

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Victor,

            Your minor children are eligible for Social Security dependent benefits, whether or not they are disabled, if your Family Maximum Benefit (FMB) is more than your Primary Insurance Amount (PIA), which is your benefit before reduction for Medicare premiums or taxes. You can check the amount of your FMB and PIA by calling Social Security at 1-800-772-1213.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  54. Tom Johnson says:

    My 18 year old physically disabled (since birth) son just started receiving SSI. They deducted $233 from food and housing as he lives with his mother and me. He really needs a wheelchair van and I was hoping to use in SSI to help pay for it. It seems the van has to be in his name in order to use SSI to pay for it… but then I believe this “automobile” will count as a resource against his $2,000 maximum. These vans are very expensive (even used). Can he get a van? He cannot drive/does not have a driver license. Plus there is car insurance which may be expensive as I cannot add it to my policy if the van is not in my name (maybe a joint ownership?). Any advise?

    Also, since he is home with a private duty nurse, can I have his SSI help pay the electric/water bill? When we go to work, he is still at home and needing A/C for example. I cannot turn it up during the day to save on electricy so my bills are $500+ at times in the summer. SSI deducted for food (he cannot eat our food as he does not swallow) and housing.

    Finaly, I have to report annually everything he spends his SSI on. Is this because I am is representative? If he didn’t have a representative and managed on his own funds, would he still have to report all his SSI spending? We are in the process of filing for gaurdianship but maybe I should go for something else like medical power of attorney instead.

    Thanks!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tom,

      If the van is in your son’s name, it will not count toward his resource limit because one vehicle is excluded. Check with the DMV, but I believe that he should be able to own and register the vehicle in his name and list you as the only regular driver or you and his mother as the only regular drivers. You might call insurance companies to ask for rate quotes with that situation. You can use the SSI to help pay the utility bills. I suggest that you apply for food stamps for your son to pay for his food. Then if he is has enough funds to pay some of the rent or mortgage and shelter utilities (not phone and cable), his SSI could be increased. If he can pay his share, which is the total costs divided by the number of people in the household, his SSI can go up to $733. (Note, if you pay for some of the van and the SSI money pays for some of it. The portion you pay with your money should not be income because it is to purchase an excludable resource.

      Lastly, if your son is mentally capable of directing the use of his benefits and were to receive benefits directly, he would not have to report how he spent the benefits, but he would have to provide information about his living arrangement and whether is paying for his food and housing.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  55. Sofia says:

    Also would like to add that he told me as longest I don’t have 2000 sitting in the bank I would be fine. I’m so confuse please help

  56. Sofia says:

    Ok my question is the following. Have a son that’s severely autstic along with other disabilities. I’m a single mother of 5 kids one that just turn 18 that I have to help with college books etc. when I first applied for benefits I had no job no other income no child support etc. so the man doing the interview said hey have you tired looking into Ihss my response what is that he said were they pay you to take care of your son since he required 24/7 supervision because he’s a threat to him self and others if. It watch. He wonders has almost no speech had memory lost etc.so he gave me the paperwork to start the process. So I ask wouldn’t this affect my sons ssi he said nope absolutely not the good thing about this you don’t even have to report it to us . Because it’s coming from the same resource so all this time I’m still thinking I don’t have to report it so Ihss doesn’t take away federal or any taxes at all but the irs still required me to file taxes so I did and got taxes back we are a family of 6 no husband no nothing. So now I’m up for the review they do every year to three years and it’s asking if I filed taxes self employed do I receive military checks etc now I don’t even know if I’m in trouble for listening to the man that did are interview and I take at the ssi office I’m afraid and scared I feel like not even going to the interview but I don’t make enough money to cover are rent 1400 plus I needed a new car the other one motor was giving out have a car payment of 537 plus insurance of 191 no child support no other income . I get paid through Ihss 9.65 an hour for 195 hours a month if I get cut off we will most likely become homeless. My son requires to be watch 24/7 and can’t be left alone that’s why I can’t get another job or have a personnel life outside of this my whole life revolves around him 24/7 from dropping him 35 min drive to school and back everyday Monday through Friday to still whipping him etc please help me I’m so scared of what can happen I went accordling to what the ssi told me . Do you have any advice for me thank you in advance

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sofia,

      The program that is paying you to care for your child may not count as income for SSI, but you should report it on the SSI redetermination forms. Get the exact name of the program that is paying you so that you can put it on the forms. Even if the income is potentially countable as wages with three other minor children besides your disabled child, who do not have income, your earnings are not enough to affect your son’s benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  57. Leanne says:

    When reporting wages we were told that we do not count the cost of my husbands insurance and his 401K contributions because it is before tax. Now a new case worker is telling us that 401k contributions is to be reported. Our child receives SSI and her case is ALWAYS a mess, we turn in the paperwork but it seems it is at the discretion of whoever is working the case. Can you please clarify this for me.

    Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Leanne,

      Gross wages before deductions or special allocations for insurance or retirement count as income for Supplemental Security Income. The rationale is that the worker chooses to spend part of his or her wages on insurance, retirement savings, or anything else that is deducted.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • brittany says:

        I have a couple questions I am married but my husband makes 2,000 a month he’s is an illegal citizen. Will they still count him with my income?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Brittany,

          Yes, your husband’s income will be counted in determining whether you are eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). A spouse’s income does not affect Social Security Disability (SSDI).

          Sincerely,
          Kay

      • Wendy says:

        Hi Kay! I have two children on SSI and are both currently getting innovations waviors through NC. Up until my dad passed away the end of June I worked for his company. Since then his lawyer has taken it upon himself to have me removed and my paychecks stopped due to me being a beneficiary also. However, all of my dads belonging and my inheritance are held in an irrevocable trust. He stated I would be better off not being an employee because he plans on selling my dads company. However he has left me in a worse position than I was previously. I now get a distribution check for 3k and I have to find my own insurance by Nov. I need to file disability myself because my medical bills alone last year were over 10 thousand dollars due to a 13 year chronic illness. My dads trust is set up to where my sister and I will receive nothing until our stepmother passes away. Help! Any suggestions would be wondful. My kids can’t afford to lose their services.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Wendy,

          You need to report the change to the Social Security Administration right away. The $3,000-a-month distribution check sounds like unearned income. If it is unearned (not work income), it will count much more heavily in determining your sons’ eligibility for SSI than $3,000 in wages would and may make them ineligible. Take all the paperwork on the kind of distribution you are receiving so Social Security can determine whether it is some kind of income earned from the business under SSI rules, even though you are not performing services, or not.

          You, yourself, may or may not be eligible for disability benefits. Receiving extensive treatment for a chronic illness does not necessarily mean a person is disabled. You need to be prepared to explain why you cannot work in the occupation you were performing and, depending on your age, in any other occupation.

          Lastly, when the insurance through your father’s company ends, you can investigate insurance through the Affordable Care Act, where you might receive some government subsidy to help with the premiums. You can get more information at http://www.healthcare.gov.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  58. Lamar says:

    I receive ssi and it is direct deposit, my friends call on to fix something from them time to time and they pay me. I was wondering if i was to deposit the money into my account when i receive it, will it mess with my ssi in any way?

    (random amounts throughout the month)

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lamar,

      You are required by law to report your earnings whether or not you deposit the earnings to your bank account. You can have work earnings of $65 a month with no reduction in SSI ($85 if you have no other income). For every two dollars you earn over that amount, your SSI will go down by $1.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • shantell says:

      I have been recieving benefits for 10 years and my 5 year old son recieves them because i am disabled. However the sent me to their doctors for psych and physical evaluation and needless to say their doctors said due to my education and age i was no longer disabled. My doctor clearly states that i cannot work i suffer from severve anxiety and major depression from working in a trauma center for almost 20 -years 80hrs a week my medications cause me to forget memory loss irritable confusion weak tiredness cant focuse etccc. In addition i have a severe right leg injury sustained back in 2005 from car accident drunk driving. Because i missed the dead line to have my benefits continued while in the appeal process even after i explained in due to my medicine they still turn me down so me and my son have nothing as of this month until a decision is made so i guess i will be homeles i dont live in subsidize housing i have car payment i dont know what to do.

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Shantell,

        Check with your local state or county social services office to see whether any cash assistance is available to families with dependent children. You may have to pay the assistance back if your Social Security is re-established. Also, it is a good idea to secure an attorney to help with your appeal. You can reach a knowledgeable Social Security attorney by completing the online form on this page to request a free Benefits Evaluation from Disability Advisor. When you hire a Social Security attorney, you do not have to pay any legal fees up front and you will pay attorney fees only if you are approved for benefits. Social Security law sets the amount your attorney can charge and the Social Security Administration pays the attorney directly from the retroactive award at the time they send your back pay to you. So, it’s all very easy and risk-free.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  59. Vetnelys says:

    Forgpt to add that I spoke personal with the caseworker and he told me that what I need is the good faith estimate, receipts and bank statements. And supposedly that it will be fine cause is our first home.cause in the apartment that we live is a 2/2 and they need space, is more for the kids that we are doing this so they can have space and a backyard we they can run in a save place with a fence, cause my son likes to wonder around to much.I’m just worry that my kids lose there medicaid cause of this..just in case I don’t work my husband is the only one working and we are a family of 4..thanks

  60. Vetnelys says:

    Hi..my 2 kids receive SSI of $615 monthly sometimes when is 5 weeks in a month they receive less..my question is we just recently bought a house. My husband took from his 401k 7,000 for the house and to buy furniture a fix a few stuff from the house including the fence. We have right now 5,000 and in 1 week we have to buy the carpets for the rooms (they are at 1,040 in total for carpet) and paint and still fix stuff…we bought the house on June 5 and the check of the 401k were deposit on June 3… Can this affect the SSI for my kids but the most important the medicaid? Shude a wait until June 19 and report this with the receipts of in were do we use the money and the bank statement with the balance in the account? Thank u

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Vetnelys,

      You do need to report all the changes to Social Security. If you plan to finish spending the 401k by the 19th, I would wait to report all the changes till then. Note that the withdrawal from the 401K may be considered income if the 401K has been excluded from resources. If the 401K counts toward the resource limit, the withdrawal probably is not income, but the 40lK balance may make your child ineligible for SSI because apparently the asset can be accessed.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  61. MP says:

    My son was born premature in 2014 and spent many months in the NICU. He was approved for benefits. He received $30 from March & April and $721 in May when he finally went home? Unfortunately, I allowed his aunt to open a CD with my name & social. So because of that, they canceled his benefits. Now a year later, he still sees specialists, gets physical therapy, and will be getting occupational therapy… and I am drowning in bills and copay for him. I did cancel and close the CD back in May last year, but what else should I do to get his benefits reinstated? Can his benefits be reinstated or am I to reapply (well apply because the hospital social worker applied the first time)? I really need help…. I was trying to pay everything on my own, but I owe everyone… companies, family members, coworkers…. everyone! I need help! My head is under water!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear MP,

      Benefits can be reinstated without a new claim if your son was ineligible for less than twelve months. You do not say when your name went on the CD or when you took it off. However, deemed resources from parents to disabled children is not applicable when a child is in an institution (hospital) receiving $30 monthly. Therefore, the first month he could have been ineligible should be May 2014.

      You need to take the CD documents to Social Security to show the amount of the resource, when your name went to the CD and when it was taken off. How long your son was ineligible after you took your name off the CD depends on the amount of the CD and whether you had other countable resources. The period of ineligibility after disposal of a resource for less than market value is typically how long the CD would have supported your child at the monthly SSI Federal Benefit Amount ($721 in 2014 and $733 in 2015) if you had used it to support him rather than giving it away, which is what you legally did when you took your name off the CD. (Note that if you were listed as survivor owner and couldn’t access the CD while your son’s aunt was living, then the CD probably is not a countable resource and benefits should not have been stopped.) Don’t delay contacting Social Security. If you can’t get to the office this week, call 1-800-772-1213 and request an appointment for reinstatement. Get the name of the person you talk to and an estimate of the date by which you will be notified an appointment date.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  62. MP says:

    My son was born premature in 2014 and spent many months in the NICU. He was approved for benefits. He received $30 from March & April and $721 in May when he finally went home? Unfortunately, I allowed his aunt to open a CD with my name & social. So because of that, they canceled his benefits. Now a year later, he still sees specialists, gets physical therapy, and will be getting occupational therapy… and I am drowning in bills and copay for him. I did cancel and close the CD back in May last year, but what else should I do to get his benefits reinstated? Can his benefits be reinstated or am I to reapply (well apply because the hospital social worker applied the first time)? I really need help…. I was trying to pay everything on my own, but I owe everyone… companies, family members, coworkers…. everyone! I need help! My head is under water!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear MP,

      If your son is ineligible for less than a year, you do not have to file a new application. So that I can respond more fully and hopefully provide some guidance, please tell me the amount of the CD, whether it was in your name only or also in the aunt’s name, whether it was a gift to you, what happened to the money from the cashed out CD? Did it go to you or back to the aunt? Are you married? If so, does your spouse live in the same household?

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • MP says:

        The CD was for $20,000. It was in my name and in his aunt’s name. Once cancelled, the $19,975 went back to his aunt (the bank charged $25 for canceling). It was never my money. I was just asked to open a CD with her because she was having some legal and personal issues and was scared to leave all that money sitting in her home. Also, I am single…. it’s just me and my son.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear MP,

          If your son has been ineligible for more than a year, you will have to file a new application and get a new medical decision. If it is less than a year, you can request a redetermination of financial eligiblity. Explain everything you previously explained to me to Social Security–the money was not yours so you could not use it to spend down–you had to give it to the owner when you got your name off it. Take a statement from your child’s aunt and proof of when the CD was liquidated.

          In the meantime, I suggest that you look into health insurance for your child under CHIP, which is a federal program for children adminstered by your state’s social services office.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  63. Brianna says:

    I’m receiving SSI and I’m 18 years old. My mother has been neglectful in taking care of me since I was born. She is a drug addict. I’m going away for college in August. How can I stop her from receiving “my” payments? I don’t care if I don’t recieve them after that but I really can’t deal with her abusing money that isn’t hers any longer.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Brianna,

      You are of age and apparently mentally capable of directing the use of your funds. You can apply to be your own payee and receive your payment directly by going to a local Social Security office. If you are receiving SSI (Supplemental Security Income) because you are disabled, you will be asked questions about your other income including the sources of your college financial aid. If you are receiving benefits as a non-disabled dependent child of a deceased worker or one that receives Social Security disability or retirement benefits, then your benefits will end when you graduate from high school.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  64. cynthia says:

    I have received a letter from social security asking if we are the landlord, Iam thinking it is because our daughter and family lived in our home from Nov.of 2014 to March of 2015. We rent the home for 735.00 per month along with water bill,cable,heat and gas,internet….we asked her to help with cost why here of 500.00 which included all the above.She receives 733.00 per month. why would they need info from parents on if she was paying the rent and how much?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Cynthia,

      It sounds as if your daughter is receiving or has been approved for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). The amount of SSI your daughter for the months she was in your home depends on whether whether she was paying for her shelter costs at that time. Respond by saying that you rent the house and that your daughter paid $500 a month for housing while she lived with you.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  65. nicole burney says:

    I have a cousin that gets ski from her deceased mother if she was to get married will her benefits stop?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Nicole,

      If your cousin is receiving Social Security survivor benefits as a disabled adult child, her survivor benefits will cease unless she marries someone who is also receiving Social Security disabled adult child benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  66. leysa90 says:

    Hi kay! i just wanted to ask about my sons (6yrsold) ssi. i am his representative payee and i have another daughter with different daddy.. but i dont leave with my bf but we have a joint account hes the only one who has work he let me to join on his account because of our daughters need.. now my question is is it gonna affect my sons Ssi? because my son has his own account.. and another question can i use my sons money to pay the rent ? im lived with my parents and they pay 1,750 and my mother cannot afford all of expenses thats why i told her my son can contribute $200 each month and the manager of the apartment will give me a proof that my son has a contribution on the rent.. is it fine?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Leysa,

      It is fine to use part of your son’s SSI benefit to contribute to the cost of his shelter. However, he may not be eligible for benefits because of your name being on your boyfriend’s bank account. All the money your boyfriend puts into the account is considered income to you because you have access to it. Also, if the balance is over $4,000 or the balance plus your and your son’s other assets come to over $4,000, your son is likely ineligible due to excess resources. At this point, your son is probably overpaid for all months in which your name has been on the account.

      If the only money you use from the account is used for your daughter, then possibly your best action is to remove your name from the account and have your boyfriend pay child support to you for your daughter. You do not say whether you have income of your own, but even if you do, your daughter having child support is likely to have less (if any) impact on your son’s SSI.

      Also, you are required by law to report the account to Social Security. If your son is overpaid because of it, you can request waiver of collection of the overpayment, which may or may not be granted. If it is not granted, you could request collection by partial withholding from his monthly check.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  67. Diane says:

    I have 2 kids that receive ssi a month what is the limit for if I start working???
    Question number 2:::::: I called the first of the month to have my bank account info changed well they didn’t change so how long will it take to reissue the money to my new bank account????

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Diane,

      I would expect it will take a couple weeks if everything goes smoothly. You need to contact the Social Security Administration in about a week to see if the bank has returned the funds to the Treasury Department. If not, ask them what has to be done to get the funds returned. For future reference, you should keep your old bank account open until a benefit check is issued to the new bank account. Doing so will prevent funds from being sent back.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  68. Steve says:

    Hello Kay
    I have a question. I live at home with my 68 year old mother. She still works full time. I am in my 50’s and my adult son also lives in the home. I pay a great portion of the mortgage, taxes, food, etc. Does my mother have to report that my son and I are contributing to the household when she applies for Social Security? If so, how much will her benefit be reduced? Thanks for your help.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Steve,

      Family household composition and who pays the bills have no bearing on your mother’s Social Security retirement benefits. Her retirement will be an earned benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  69. Natasha says:

    My mother is receiving SSI benefits, and we have encountered an issue. When I opened my first bank account, I was 16, so they put her name on the account. I’m 23 now, have been living on my own since I was 18, but we never thought to take my mother’s name off the bank account because we thought she was a beneficiary rather than a joint member on the account. Her case worker found the account, stopped her check payment, and has closed her case even though she told her that if she could get the account closed and bring in a letter from the bank, they could start her checks back at the beginning of the next month. She had the letter, but her case worker has said that her case has been closed and she will have to reapply and pay back all the money she has received. My bank statements show that she obviously has not had any way of getting to the account; I have the only debit card and all the checks, and all the charges have been made in the town I live in now, which is 2 hours away from where my mother lives. Is there anything that we can do to get her payment started again and to prevent her from having to pay back all the money she has been receiving?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Natasha,

      First I will describe the law. If your mother’s name was on the bank account as a joint owner of the account, the money in the account is legally hers and accessible to her, whether convenient or not. This means that your deposits to the account are income to her and the balance in the account on the first of the month is an asset that counts against your mother’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) $2,000 resource limit ($3,000 if she is married and living with her spouse). The law also says that if a person is financially ineligible for twelve months in a row, she must file a new application and, if she was receiving disability benefits, the application must undergo medical review for her to be approved medically for benefits.

      You do not say how long your mother has been receiving SSI or whether she has submitted the bank statements all the way back to her entitlement date. If the bank statements have not been reviewed all the way back to the date of her entitlement, there is a chance that she might have been eligible in some months that would break up the ineligible months in a manner that resulted in no single period of twelve months of ineligibility. If that is the case, then she could have reinstatement of benefits without a new application.

      With regard to the overpayment, she will be overpaid in every month that you made deposits and also in every month that the ending balance of the month before was in excess of the resource limit or the balance together with her other bank accounts and countable assets put her over the limit. If the bank statements haven’t been reviewed, I suggest that you get them and review them to see if there are months they are below the limit for resources and whether in those months your deposits were less than $20 above the amount of SSI your mother was eligible for in those months. If so, she should appeal the closure of the claim and the amount of the overpayment. She has sixty days to appeal. If she requests the appeal within ten days of receiving the closure letter, she may be able to get payment continuation; however, if she loses the appeal she will likely have to pay it back.

      She can simultaneously make a written request for waiver of repayment on the grounds of not being at fault (didn’t think to report the account because she had signed for you years before and she didn’t use the account or money), it wouldn’t be fair because despite the legal ownership, the money was all your deposits and she didn’t use it and because she cannot afford to repay.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  70. Emma says:

    Hi, I’m 16, and it’ll be soon until I get a part-time job. I live with my mom who receives SSI, and so I receive benefits through my mom. Does she have to report my earnings? Will my earnings decrease the amount of money she receives from SSI? I don’t want that to happen to her, please reply back

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Emma,

      If you are receiving benefits because your mother does, you are receiving Social Security dependent benefits, not SSI, which is Supplemental Security Income. No amount of your earnings will affect your mother’s benefits. If you are receiving Social Security dependent benefits, you can earn $!5,720 gross a year before your benefits are reduced. If you earn more than that, your total annual benefit will be reduced one dollar for every two dollars above $15,720. Your mother needs to report your work and give an estimate if you expect to earn above $15,720 in any year.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Sav says:

        Hey Kay, I am about to turn 19 and I still live with my mom who is receiveing ssi. If I get a job will it decrease her benefits

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Sav,

          Your income does not affect your mother’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI). As long as you do not contribute more than your share of shelter and food expenses, your contributing to those costs will not affect her benefits either.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  71. tia says:

    I need help understanding something on ssi. My 3 year old get ssi and can i pay the rent in full or not. My rent is 435 or does it have to be half that 217.50. If i mess up like if i was supposed to pay half do i put the other half of the rent money back in her account.. im lost. I paid the rent and light bill in full the last two months. Should i cut that in half and put it back in her account.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tia,

      If you and your three-year-old who gets Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are the only people in your household you do not have to be concerned about your child paying his or her share. Your income is considered in determining her payment amount; therefore the issue of her getting in-kind support and maintenance from you does not apply.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  72. Paul says:

    Hello Kay,
    I kind of got an idea about my situation while reading others issues with SSI, but anyway I would like to tell my story. I am parent-payee of 4 y.o disabled child. Last year, in 02/14 we applied for SSI and in 09/14 were finally approved. Now a year later, I got a mail stating that SSI determined that during 03/14 – 09/14, my son was not eligible for benefits due to over $5000 resource limit. So, my explanation to that is following: we are two parents household and have to cars – so one was exempt other is counted as resources. (I am wondering if my wife needs a car to take child with disability to school and various medical appointments, and I need another car to get to work. Is it possible to request that second care was exempt from resources? Also in 02/14 and then 05/14 I got Fed. tax returns for about $4k ( I read that tax return refund could be exempt for up to 9 month), so in our situation second car and tax refunds put us over that limit. Is there any chances that SSA would forgive us that overpayment and stop counting my second car(essential for me being able to go to work)? Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Paul,

      You can appeal the fact of the overpayment, if you think that an error has been made. First, you could appeal if the Federal tax refunds were counted as a resource in the twelve months after it was received and it put you over the limit. (Federal income tax refunds are not countable resources for twelve months from receipt. See http://www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/ssir/SSI11/Exclusions.html)

      Second, you could appeal if you and your wife cannot share a vehicle to get you to and from work (she drop you off and pick you up) and take your disabled child to appointments and possibly to school if he or she can’t ride the school bus. You could ask to have the car used for your child’s transportation excluded as at the primary care and the second one excluded as a resource necessary for self-support. There’s something else to look at if your cars aren’t paid for–their resource value is the equity value, that is the retail market value reduced by the amount you owe on the cars.

      If when you get an explanation of how the overpayment was calculated, you agree with the fact of the overpayment or you lose an appeal, you can request waiver of repayment based on not being at fault (you will have to explain why) and on being unable to repay. The waiver request form is SSA-632. If the waiver is denied, you can request partial withholding of your child’s benefits to collect the overpayment over time.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  73. Ms. ANNE says:

    Hi I have two kids that are under 18 who have autism, and they both receive SSI. I’m supposed to get a small one time back payment of 6,000 from my personal worker’s compensation case, plus beginning payments of 700 a month. I really want know if my kids will be cut off forever when I report this? Or will the cut off be only for that month I received the 6,000? Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ms. Anne,

      You do not say whether you have other income besides the expected workers comp. If you do not, then the children’s SSI will be affected in only one month, the month you receive the $6,000 income because you are allowed to have $753 countable income for your own support.

      Any money not spent in the month received will count toward your and your children’s resource limit; however, if you do not have a lot of other countable assets, the children will continue to be eligible in months following the receipt of the funds. For example, lets say you save all the money except to use $1,466 to refund the children’s SSI for the month you receive the back pay and you get the back pay in March. In April the remainder of $4,534, plus any money you have on hand or any other countable resources will count first against your $2,000 resource limit. For example, we’ll say you have no other countable resources in which case $2,000 of the $4,534 will count toward your resource limit and the remainder of $2,534 will be split between the two SSI-eligible children and $1,267 will count toward each of the children’s $2,000 limit. (You can find a list of countable and non-countable resources at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/ssi/text-resources-ussi.htm.)

      A side note: if you expect to be disabled from all occupations for over a year from when you ceased work, you can apply for Social Security Disability for yourself.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Ms. ANNE says:

        Thanks Kay, I stopped working last year due to a work related injury, and I applied for SSI, and was denied. I have no other income other than the SSI for my kids and now the new money from the workers compensation. So I thank you for responding. I need that money to pay off debts. Should I show SSI that this money will be going to debts and not shopping sprees to avoid being sanctioned or something? Thanks

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Ms. Anne,

          Yes, when you report receipt of the money, it would be a good idea to show that the money was used to pay off debts. Keep in mind that one of those debts will be the amount your children are overpaid in the month you receive the workers comp and that you need to use some of the workers comp to repay that debt.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  74. Lynette says:

    Hi, We have been receiving SSI for my little guy since August 2012. he has autism (he receives max amount 733.00) My husband is self employed and I never reported income changes because I didn’t think we ever went over the monthly limit ($3000 married couple). Then I got a letter today saying they are calling me next week to discuss because of my reporting to the IRS for our taxes. So I went and added up 1099s he received from last year and they total $38,213! That would be about $2213 over for the entire year. But I have no idea what months that money that was extra was received in! I’m a little bit panicked because none of this was intentional, just an oversight. I am not great with record keeping as to determine what exact monthly amount were. I just always go off the 1099s that he is issued. What kind of records should I be getting together for this meeting/call? What if I can’t prove what months, what will happen?

    Thank you so much!

    • Lynette says:

      ALso, obviously I have been doing this all wrong! Should I be reporting his income (husband’s) every single month even if we don’t go over that $3000 amount? If they take funds back, will they take the full amount every month until they are paid?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lynette,

      You appear to have mixed up the $3,000 resource limit (limit on what you can own including cash carried over from month to month) with income limits.
      Money you and your husband and child receive in a month is income. Money that is not spent in the month that it is received and is carried over to the following month is a resource.

      You are right that you should have reported your husband’s earnings. Self-employment earnings are divided by twelve if the person worked all year and 1/12 of the year’s earnings is charged to each month. Your husband’s countable earnings are his net profit (gross income less business expenses).

      When you go in for the interview, you need to take in your husband’s 2012, 2013, and 2014 Schedule C’s from his tax returns (or other tax form that shows his business profit or income from a corporation or partnership if he is not a sole proprietor). If your son is overpaid, you can discuss how the overpayment will be collected and request partial withholding.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Lynette says:

        I see! I was thinking when we first applied, we were told as long as we made under $2950.00 per month, we still qualified for the full payment. That’s where I was getting the $3000 figure. Ok, well it sounds like we will be ok after they look at our taxes and his schedule C’s (he is a sole-proprietor) because that reduces our income substantially. I’m glad to know about that number being divided by 12. I think we will be fine then.

        So, how does the $3000 resource thing work? Can we have that much in savings? We are trying to save for a house and are curious how all that works when saving? Also, isn’t there a $2000 limit for my son? How much money can we set aside for saving for our son?

        Thank you so much for your time!

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Lynette,

          I do not know about any special rules that exclude savings to purchase a house, but you can check with the Social Security Administration to be sure. All assets that are not excluded under SSI or other federal law count toward the asset limit, cash, bank accounts, stock, usually the equity value of a second vehicle, boats,etc. You can find a list of excluded (non-countable) resources at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/ssi/text-resources-ussi.htm. If you and your husband have over $3,000 in countable resources, the excess is deemed (considered) to be your SSI-eligible child’s resource and counts toward your child’s $2,000 limit.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  75. sam cutler says:

    Hello, I just went threw all these comments to see if anyone had a similar situation and I didn’t see one, so here’s my question…I receive ssi for 2 of my 3 children ($733 a piece) I have a 2005 truck that is worth about 5k. I know the first car doesn’t count as a resource but I just consigned for a car for my sister. I’m not the one making payments and didn’t put the money down she just needed a cosigner, will this affect my children’s ssi? I’m a single mom of 3 and I had to quit my job because of my children’s disabilities and the only resource I have is my truck. Please help me I’m fairly new to ssi and what counts as a resource and what doesn’t. I saw that the limit is 2k but is that per household or per child? I don’t receive any government help for myself the only income that comes into my household is the ssi. Thank you.

    • sam cutler says:

      I meant to type through all the comments.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sam,

      If your name is on the registration and will go on the title when the car is paid off, you have ownership in the car and the car’s equity value counts toward the resource limits. The car’s equity value is its retail value minus the amount owed on it. The equity and resource value will change as it is paid off. If your name is not on the registration and won’t be on the title, then it is not resource.

      The resource limit applies to you and your two disabled children. You each have a $2,000 limit. Any excess resources you have are split between the two SSI-eligible children and count toward their limits. For example, if you have $3,000 in countable assets, the $1,000 excess resources would be split and $500 would count toward each of your children’s $2,000 limit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  76. Danielle says:

    Dear Kay,
    I have read thorough many of the questions on this site but haven’t found any that fit our situation. I am hoping you can help me.
    My children (10 and 12) recieve SSI benefits. In 2012, my grandfather who is elderly and has some degree of dementia told me that he was allocating some stock to all of his children and grandchildren so that they would recieve it when he passed away. Shortly thereafter I had a review with our SS office and mentioned this to them. They said all I needed to do was report this in the event of my grandfather’s passing. I just found out that what he actually did was give us the stock, NOT make us beneficiaries. So I have unknowingly had this stock which looks to be worth around 6,600.00. If I had known this I would have reported it right away. My stomach is in knots!
    My questions are:
    1. When I report this (which I will do as soon as possible) what will happen? Judging from your answers to other responses I am guessing it will be over our asset limit and will only affect the one month in which it was recieved.
    2. How will this affect our children’s Medicaid? If the SSI money is suspended will their medicaid also be suspended? We do meet income criteria that qualifies them for Medicaid without SSI. Is there a chance their medicaid will be unaffected? Obviously the Medicaid is our biggest concern right now. My son is tube fed and his supplies are very expensive. They are also both on injectible medication that costs thousnads of dollars out of pocket each month. We could not afford to to cover any of those costs.
    I should mention that at the time it appears my grandfather gave us the stock only my son was on SSI benefits. My daughter was not approved until 2013.
    I just want to know what I can expect. I am so worried that my ignorance of this situation (and stocks in general) has put my children’s benefits in jeopardy.
    Please help! Thank you so much in advance for any help or advice you can offer!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Danielle,

      I believe that there is a point in the law that the asset does not count if you did not know of its existence (in this case that you and your son owned the stock.) Report the ownership of the stock right away by going to a Social Security office. Ask to speak to a claims representative (not a service representative) because of a change in resources. Explain that what you told me, that you understood that the stock would pass to you and your son upon your grandfather’s death and that you had reported the stock in that manner previously. Tell them the date that you became aware of the current ownership. (I suggest writing all this out and taking a written statement with you as well as explaining it orally. Keep a copy of the statement and ask for a copy of anything else you sign while there.)

      The stock should count as income in the month you became aware of it. (The rationale behind this is that you can’t support yourself or your son with something you did know you had.) Resources are counted as of the first of the month, so the following month, your son will likely be ineligible and will remain ineligible until his assets go below $2,000. If you repay the overpayment and cover your child’s medical expenses, there will be no problem in spending down in a way acceptable under SSI law and he will soon be below the limit and have his benefits reinstated. (See my comments about deemed resources below in figuring his assets.)

      Your daughter will probably be ineligible in the month you became aware of the stock because the value of the stock will be counted as your income. As far as resources and your daughter’s eligibility, see the deemed resources explanation below.

      If your children do not have a father or step-father in the household, your resource limit is $2,000 ($3,000 for two parents). Any amount above that will be split between your SSI eligible children and counted toward each eligible child’s $2,000 resource limit. Because your son will be ineligible due to his own assets, probably the entire excess will count toward your daughter’s $2,000 limit. So, if you received $3,300 in stock and had no other countable assets, $1,300 would count toward your daughter’s $2,000 limit and she would continue to be eligible based on resources. This means that her overpayment would probably be for only one month and her ongoing Medicaid would be uninterrupted. At the point that your son become eligible again in terms of his own resources, any excess you had would be split between the two children.

      With regard to Medicaid for your son, as soon as you have gone to Social Security, you should probably apply for Medicaid from your state social service office. Some states do not have a resource limit for Medicaid for children or the limit is higher than SSI’s. Explain the temporary ineligibility for SSI and the need for Medicaid for life-sustaining medical services.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  77. Joe says:

    I am 25 and I receive SSI at $733 a month and I pay $510 after utilities. I just started taking GED classes and I plan to go to college soon after the GED. Do I need to report this change from no schooling to taking classes? Would effects could this have on my income?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Joe,

      You do not have to report going to school; however, if you earn a degree or certificate you need to report because you may have gained the ability to work in occupations you could not do previously. If you receive financial assistance for attending or start to work, do report that. Some federal grants and work study income are not countable income, but you need to report to be sure the type of aid you are receiving doesn’t count as income for Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  78. Dustin says:

    I’m disabled & divorced. My son receives benefits from my ssdi, will moving into the same household affect his monthly benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dustin,

      If your child receives only Social Security dependent benefits, not Supplemental Security Income (SSI) because he is disabled, who he lives with does not affect his benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  79. marly says:

    how would my tax refund affect my son’s ssi?

  80. Beverly says:

    I appreciate this site! Very informative. Hope you can help us.

    We have a son who is mentally retarded and receives SSI. Recently, they sent us a form about family income…in other words, who pays for what bills, and so on. My understanding is that Social Security requires each person to pay their fair share. So since there are 3 of us, we each need to pay 1/3 of the bills. However, I have no income, so when I filled out the form, I put 0 as the amount I pay, 2/3 as my husband’s contribution, and 1/3 as our son’s contribution. Now SS has cut our son’s SSI check by several hundred dollars. They sent no information to us at all in the mail, they just did this. Did I do something wrong? This is all very confusing and it is very difficult to get anyone at our local SS office to answer the phone. We will need to go down there to talk to them but hoping for some guidance before we do so! Thank you for reading my long post!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Beverly,

      First, the decrease in income may not be due to how you answered the living arrangement questions. It may be due to your husband’s income if your son is a minor.

      Regarding living arrangements, if your son is a minor and the household consists only of him and his parents, paying one’s share does not apply.Instead, your and your husband’s income is considered in determining your son’s benefit. Go to Social Security and say that you think you did not fill out the form correctly regarding living arrangement because you didn’t understand the form. Say that only your son and his parents live in the household.

      If your son is age eighteen or older, your income does not affect his benefit and, if he is paying one-third of the shelter and food costs, his SSI benefit should not be reduced for in-kind (non-cash) support.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Beverly says:

        Thank you for your reply. Our son is an adult. My husband is a disabled Veteran and receives Veteran’s benefits. I do not have any income at this time. All I can think is that I filled out the form incorrectly. What would I have to do to get this rectified? Thank you so much for your time.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Beverly,

          Your husband’s income does not affect your adult child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI). I suggest that you go to Social Security with the bills for your shelter expenses (and a food estimate if you don’t have receipts and you all eat together and your son does not have food stamps). If he has food stamps, he is considered as eating separate. Tell the representative that you were not expecting a decrease in your son’s benefits because he has no income other than SSI and because nothing has changed in his living arrangements; he still pays his share of expenses. Say that you think you must have made a mistake in completing the redetermination papers. Say your husband pays two-thirds the cost for him and you and your son pays the remaining third. If they respond positively and say they will fix the situation for you, then that’s all you need to do. If there is any resistance, ask to file a formal request for reconsideration and make a written statement saying the same thing. (Also mention not getting any correspondence about the reduction.)

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  81. Jeri says:

    Hello Kay,

    I am 35, from California, and receive 889.40 a month, I believe from SSI not SSDI (but I’m not 100% sure). I live with my parents as they help me with my disability and taking care of myself.

    Though I have always paid a small amount of rent, my father (our former bread-winner) recently battled cancer for the second time and it left him disabled – forcing him to retire. He has a case against the VA for asbestos and mesothelioma, but as of now he barely receives any money. I now have to cover way more rent than before, as well as take care of him and his disabilities full time, and pay to feed my household of 4. (It was 5 but I didn’t know I had to report that my oldest brother moved out, which I will report asap).

    My Mom is the only one working and all her money goes to mortgage and bills. I was paying them about $200-$400 a month previously and now I use my entire check for household food, toilet paper/home supplies, bills, car repairs, medical traveling and expenses for my Dad, etc. Does my Dad’s change in employment to disabled retirement have to be reported and if so, will there be any way to help increase my income so that I can actually support myself properly?

    I was hoping to some day move out, but my family would crumble without my support at this point and I cannot do that to them after all the years of support they have showered upon me. I only want to be able to help provide for my Mom, Dad and younger brother with help and ease the risk of losing our home.

    Thank you for taking the time to read this.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jeri,

      If you always receive your benefit payment on the first of the month it is Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If it comes on a certain Wednesday of the month, then it is Social Security Disability (SSDI). Your father’s income does not affect your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment amount or your SSDI amount, if you are getting SSDI.

      Changes in the number of people in the household can affect your benefit amount because your share of the shelter and food expenses changes. Now that your brother has moved out, your share is one-fourth of the total. (Cable and phone are not considered shelter expenses.) You do need to report the change, but it sounds as if you might be paying more than your share. Your parents might investigate to see if they have disability insurance on the mortgage that would pay some or all of the mortgage.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Jeri says:

        Hi Kay, I think some words were missing from your answer regarding my fathers income. I don’t think his income affects my payment, but due to his lack of income, my portion of the rent and household expenses has increased substantially. And yes, I get paid once a month on the first, so it is SSI.

        What I do not understand is that my household is 4 people but only 2 of us are now supporting the entire household due to my dad not being able to work and my grown brother who is unable to work as well but is not receiving any support. When my Dad was working, I was only paying 1/3 of the household, but now that he is not, I am paying 1/2. The amount of people in the household doesn’t decrease the amount of help I need to provide, but increases it because I have become their provider.

        I hope that makes sense. I’m thinking about going to the Social Security office with my Dad and all the paperwork for my family that I can bring. It’s getting desperately bad for my family. I have to figure out something.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jeri,

      You are right that there were words missing from my response and that your father’s income does not affect your SSI benefits. You are also correct in your analysis of the living arrangements. Do go with your father to Social Security and take copies of the household bills for rent or mortgage, heat, power, water/sewer, and garbage and an estimate of food costs not covered by food stamps. You and your father need to make a statement of the amount your are contributing to those cost (not all the extra things that you mention, just the shelter and food costs. If you are paying your share of the shelter and food costs, then you should be eligible for the maximum SSI. Also take any proof you might have of the month you increased your contribution.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  82. radost says:

    Dear Kay,
    I’m over 65, receive SSI by age. No other income. In 2014 I received a one time payment from profit sharing plan. Payment 6000, taxes were withed and I received 4200. I use the money today back a loan.
    I have no other income. Should I still file taxes?
    It is so hard to find information and i truthfully appreciate your help!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Radost,

      I assume that you have reported the income to the Social Security Administration for your SSI claim and also gave them proof that you repaid a loan with the money. You will be ineligible in the months your received it. As far as filing a tax return because of the profit sharing plan, you need to check with the IRS or a tax accountant. It is possible that if you file a return, some or all of the taxes withheld will be refunded to you because SSI, as a public assistance benefit, is non-taxable. If you receive a refund, you do not have to report it because the gross amount of your profit sharing account was already counted by Social Security.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  83. Kevin K says:

    I live with my fiance & 21 yo Autistic son and he started getting SSI at age 19 or so and they continue to deduct for food & lodging but we would like to be able to charge for his rent & food. I would assume that we would need to contact our local SS office to advise them of that. Questions are, is there an issue with after 2 years now advising of food & lodging costs? Also, we currently buy all the food in one shot so would that be divided by 3 or wold we need to shop separately for him? One last question, would we need to prove what our current mortgage is along with all other lodging expenses and would we need to have a check written from his account or is it ok to take money out via ATM. The mother is the designated payee and legal gaurdian.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kevin,

      If your son pays one-third of the food, mortgage, power, heat, water/sewage and garbage, his benefit can increase to the maximum amount. If he contributes less than a third, his benefit could go up some but not to the maximum. You can still purchase all your food together and share meals. Take proof the the shelter expenses when you go to Social Security to report this and be prepared to provide a total food figure. Best to write a check off the account as proof of payment.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  84. Tanya says:

    Hi. I am on SSI and SSD. I had a vehicle that blew up on me so my husband and i had to start making payments on a newer car so i could get myself back and forth to the doctor. I know they dont count the first vehicle and they did not count my van i had. This car should take the place of my van and.not count against me, right? Its our only income and way to get anywhere.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tanya,

      I am a bit unclear regarding which car blew up and so on. If you have only two vehicles and one is needed for self-support (get to work) and the other has to be used at the same time for medical appointments, you should be able to have both excluded. (The equity value of the car you are buying is its value so the value will change over time.) You do need to report the changes.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  85. Christi says:

    I receive SSI for my daughter and was living with my mother but moved out and reported my change 10/21/14 but I’m still receiving the same amount. I know that I’m going to get a increase because when I stayed with my mother we had no rent because it’s our family house. Now I pay rent plus all my bills. My question is how long does it take before this change goes into effect? How long before I get my increase?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Christi,

      Your daughter’s SSI should go up two months after the first month you and she were no longer receiving free rent. If you moved out in mid-November, the increase should begin in February.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  86. Gina waters says:

    I’d like to know if 2 people are married and one makes 70,000 a year while the other partner recieves ssd in the amount of $850 plus her two kids one which is from the marriage and another child from previous relationship that get $90 each that from the ssd from the mother that recieves ssd wants to now apply for ssi For the daughter that was just diagnosed with astma and sleep apnea (5yearsold ) get ssi
    Also why do they need to know about other kids father when I’m not applying for the second child
    The second dad does finacial supports other child but not by court
    And I am a home owner with Morgage of 2500 every month etc
    Do they combine my income of ssd with my husbands or do they go by the amount of my ssd
    Thx

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Gina,

      The mother’s Social Security and disabled child’s stepfather’s income will be considered in determining whether the child is financially eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). The amount of the mother’s and stepfather’s income that will be deemed (considered) available for the support of the disabled child depends on how many other children are in the household and the amount of their own income, if any. That is the reason that the Social Security Administration asked for information about the child support the non-disabled child receives from her father.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  87. dawn says:

    I have filed for ssi for my autistic son. I got a letter for a appointment for speech evaluation and i called to reschefule.the sup3rvisor was so rude to me and kept cutting me off. I was scheduled to work that day and no one vould switch ite. Le was so mad and mean tome. Will he deny my case

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dawn,

      Hopefully, the person you spoke to won’t be the decision maker and, if he is, hopefully he will be professional and not let his annoyance affect his decision.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  88. cecilia says:

    Im sorry I meant to write DAUGHTER, I have two sons also so I just automatically wrote in SON without realizing. Thanks for your Response.

  89. cecilia says:

    Our son receives SSI and I had a question,When ssa looks at the value of a vehicle as an asset/resource and we still owe money on it, do they look at the value as a trade in or at the value if you would sell it. In our case we cannot sell because we still owe on it, we owe I believe around $6000 and the value as a trade in is 3200 but if we sell it to a private party it gives me a value of 4300.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Cecilia,

      When you wrote in before you referenced your daughter getting SSI and now you reference a son, so I wonder if you are not asking a theoretical question. In any event, the equity value of the non-excluded vehicle counts toward the SSI limit. Equity is the retail value if sold to a private party less the amount owed on the vehicle. You can read more about vehicles as a resource at https://secure.ssa.gov/apps10/poms.nsf/lnx/0501130200.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Gail Sawyer says:

        Kay, question….. can my name be on my boy scout troops bank account when it has an 04 number? I am on SSI and they are telling yes and no! The accout is in the groups name and I am an authorized signer

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Gail,

          I think you are in a gray area. Legally the money is not yours and you would be embezzling if you used the money for yourself, so one could argue that the account should not affect your SSI. On the other hand, the general rule is that any money you have access including money in a joint account counts because you have access, even if you and other other owner don’t consider the money yours. I don’t know if there is any kind of ruling on your situation. It would seem things would be simpler for you to have someone else be signer and you provide some other service to the troop. Or, you could consult with an attorney.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  90. ishmael says:

    I recently had surgery for an on the job injury and will be out of work for 3 weeks. I will be getting time loss pay from LNI. Do I have to report this for my daughter SSI benefit as income?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ishmael,

      Yes, you do need to report the change in income. Work earnings and time-loss pay are treated differently under the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  91. danielle says:

    Hi Kay thanks for your response, I checked our cars value with Kelly Blue Book and it gave me a value of $4667. Would that mean that $1667 would count against her $2000 limit? I am a little confused about how the resoursce limit works. Is she allowed $2000 in addition to me and my husband being allowed $3000? Or is this both our limits? Given these facts would it put us over our resource limit? And would I need to report to ssa and just explain our need for a second vehicle.
    Thank You

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Danielle,

      You and your husband are allowed $3,000 in resources before any of your resources are deemed available for the support of your daughter. Any resources above the $3,000 count toward her separate $2,000 limit. Therefore, you are correct that $1,667 counts toward your daughter’s limit. Resources are counted on the first of every month, so it your husband is paid late in the month, you could be over the resource limit on the first or it you have any other countable assets, your daughter could slip over the limit. I suggest that you contact Social Security and try for the exclusion. If they say you don’t need it because your daughter is not over the limit, explain that you hope to establish some small savings in the future for emergencies and the car could become material. If you are told it isn’t necessary, make a formal written request for the exclusion and request a formal written determination, which will allow appeal rights.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  92. danielle says:

    My daughter has been receiveing ssi for almost 3 years now. Our van broke down so we had to go look for a new car to transport her to medical appointments and school and she cant walk on her own yet. We have 2 car loans one for 23,000.00 and the other for 8500.00. I am aware that one vehicle will not count as an asset since it is the one that we use to transport her but will the second vehicle count as an asset. We owe 8500 on it but it is only worth 3500. Also we had to get the second car with loan because one vehicle would not work for us. My husband needs to get to work and at the same time I need to drive our daughter to medical appointments that are usually about 1 hour away and to school.We have a mortgage and we live paycheck to paycheck and having these 2 car loans will really be hard on us but we couldn’t get by with just one car, we also depend on our daughters ssi to get her what she needs every month. Will any of this affect her ssi benefit and when should I report to ssa?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Danielle,

      You do need to report the change in resources if it puts your daughter over the SSI resource limit. You and your husband can have $3,000 in countable resources (including bank account balances on the first of the month, cash, certain life insurance policies, etc.) If you do not have any other countable resources and the vehicle is worth $3,500, then $500 would count toward your daughter’s $2,000 limit. If she has no resources of her own and you can prove the second car is worth only $3,500, then your daughter’s resources would be below the limit. I suggest that you check Kelly Blue Book or another recognized publication for the retail value shown for your specific vehicle so that you can prove its value. If it appears your daughter’s resources might go over the limit, then you can also explain to the Social Security Administration the reasons for needing two vehicles; this might result in the second vehicle being excluded as a resource needed for income-producing asset (transportation to work).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  93. Shannon says:

    I am my 21 year old son’s representative payee. He is on SSI due to a traumatic brain injury when he was five. He was approved in February 2014 and it said he would be medically reviewed on 3 years. I just received a letter from social security saying that I have a telephone interview set up next week. It states that they must regularly review the case of people who get ssi to make sure they are still eligible. I don’t understand why I am getting this letter when he has only been getting ssi for 10 months? I know they are suppose to send me a form to fill out on this past years money that he has received and where it w as spent but that is not what this is I don’t think. Is this normal?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Shannon,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility is partially dependent on continuing financial eligibility, which has to be reviewed once a year. This financial review required of all SSI recipients is called a redetermination and is in addition to your annual representative payee report.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  94. Kristin J. says:

    I am trying to figure out whether my mom is getting a SSI check for me. I am 40 years old and was born with some handicaps. I am on Medicaid, and on a Medicaid waiver program for people with disabilities. I am been on my own for over 10 years but I am beginning to think that maybe my mom appointed herself fraudulently as my payee. She does not give me any money or help with taking care of me. I NEED to find out how I can find out whether she is getting a SSSI check in my name. We don’t live together.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kristin,

      Contact the Social Security Administration (SSA) and tell them that you want to report possible fraud. If you give them your Social Security number, they can tell you whether any money is being paid for you. Try SSA’s call center first at 1-800-772-1213. If that isn’t successful, visit a Social Security office.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  95. kari says:

    when receiving SSI how much money can you make a month working?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kari,

      If you are currently receiving $721 monthly and have no other income, you can earn $85 gross a month and not affect your Supplemental Security Income (SSI). For every two dollars over that amount your SSI will be reduced by $1. To receive at least $1 of benefits, your earnings need to be $1,525 or less. Note that these limits apply if you have not recovered medically from your disabling condition.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  96. Ada says:

    I live alone. I get SSI $850.00. Owner is going to increase my rent to $900.00. My brother insists that I can stay in this apartment because it is close to his own and agree to pay to the owner part of $300.00 . Will it effect amount of my SSI?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ada,

      It is possible that you are receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) in the amount of $850 if you live in a state that has an SSI state supplement; however, the amount you are receiving is more than the federal SSI. Therefore, I wonder if you are receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI). If you are receiving SSDI, your brother paying $300 of your rent will not affect your benefits. If you are, in fact, receiving SSI, your SSI benefit will go down by $240 beginning two months after he starts paying a portion of your rent.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  97. Meg says:

    Since my daughter stopped working in October, and had already reported her earnings when we went to set up her disability payments with the SSA, she has only recived $43 in compensation for november (she did not work in Novemeber), We thought he payments would go back to the normal amount that she made when she wasn’t working. Is it because we didn’t report what she spent her $$ on, or is it something else?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Meg,

      Changes in income affect Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment amount two months later. This is true whether income is increasing or decreasing. Work income counts when it is paid and not when it is earned. Your daughter will see an increase in the second month after her income went down.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  98. Meg says:

    My 22 year old receives SSI. She worked for 2 months, but had to quit due to some issues with needing to work too many hours and not being able to reach necessary equipment. I have called and reported the change to Social Security.

    I’d like to find out what the monthly reporting need is now. Do we need to report all of the things that she spent money on, such as her part of rent and food, medical payments, etc, each month? If so when is the deadline for this information to be sent. We haven’t received any reporting papers, so I had planned to send the copied one from the book. Since she is no longer working do we need to send anything stating that she doesn’t have income.
    Thanks for your help

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Meg,

      Your daughter needs to report changes in her income, her living arrangements (she moves, people move in or out of the household, changes in her contribution to household expenses–stops or starts paying her share), change in marital status, and if her assets exceed $2,000. Otherwise she does not have to make reports until Social Security asks for a redetermination of financial eligibility, which occurs every year or two. If you are her payee, you will receive a payee reporting request once a year. To complete the current report that she ceased work, she will probably have to provide verification of the date she stopped work and her last month’s earnings.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  99. Brian says:

    My father has bought a car for me to use. He wants to register it in my name as I’ll pay insurance for it, It would be my car. Should I report it as my asset? Will this negatively affect my SSI?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Brian,

      If you receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and not Social Security Disability (SSDI), you will be ineligible for SSI in the month in which the car is put into your name. After that it will not have an effect on your SSI payments.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  100. Gwen says:

    I am receiving SSI and moved out of the place I was renting on the 1st, but the housing I was supposed to be moving into fell through, so now I only have temporary housing. Do I need to report it by the 10th of this month, or the 10th of next month, when I will (hopefully) have the whole thing sorted out?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Gwen,

      You have till the 10th of the month following the month of change. That said, if you are receiving free housing for part of this month, you will have countable income that will affect your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit two months later.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  101. Rita says:

    Hello,
    My brother just turned 65 years old. He applied for SSI and did not receive the maximum benefit because he was living in his mom’s basement . Now he will pay rent and has a whole apartment. He was told to bring current rent receipt which will change when he gets maximum benefit. Currently he gets $480.00 and rent is $475.00. If he gets the maximum of $721.00 will increase to $575.00 and utilities will be included. Is there any any advice you can offer. My mother is 82 years old and can’t support him any longer.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rita,

      Your brother’s SSI will increase two months after he starts to pay the full rent. He needs to take his recent receipt in as requested; he also needs to be prepared to explain how he is living on the $5 a month he has after paying the rent. Is he receiving food stamps and not buying anything else till the SSI is increased? Is he paying the rent by using SSI back pay?

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  102. Melissa says:

    My mother is disabled and receives 60 dollars in ssa benefits and 600 dollars in ssi benefits. She recently had a stroke and her bills and medicines cost more then what medicare covers.Should her income be increased? We reported her move and all and still everything remains the same. Her rent decreased and i was told that her income would be more once she could afford her rent and utilities but it is still very low income nothing changed. what should we do?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Melissa,

      Typically benefits increase two months after a person starts to pay all their own housing and food costs. If it has been two months, then follow up with Social Security for an explanation.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  103. Randy says:

    My wife is representative payee for our 20 y/o mentally disabled (low IQ but not MR) daughter. She receives SSI ($721/mo via direct deposit to a separate account) and Medicaid. Last month she went off her meds and left home with a convicted sex offender. We are not in contact with her, don’t know where she is living or who she’s with. Even though she’s legally an adult, our hope is that she’ll tire of the situation and want to come back for her own safety. If she does contact us, we will be reluctant to forward funds to her if she’s being controlled by someone who would pocket her money. I need to know what we are required to do (we’re in Texas btw). I read where Social Security requires SSI recipients to have less than $2,000 in assets. We have no intention of touching her money until she returns or willingly elects to live elsewhere permanently. We don’t want to run afoul of the law but neither do we want her to lose her benefits. Is it possible for them to be stopped and then restarted if or when her situation is more stable?

    • Randy says:

      Clarification: I read where Social Security requires SSI recipients can have no more than “$2,000 in assets.” In 2 months she will have $1,442 in her account. In 3 months it will grow to $2,163. Are we allowed to let her payments build up to the $2,000 threshold (as “assets”).. or are payments required to be fully spent each month. In other words, can she have $2,000 in “savings?” We still incur some expenses even though she’s not living here at the moment. We will refund every penny if directed to. However, as representative payees, we do not wish to incur any fines or penalties.

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Randy,

        I recommend that you report to Social Security right away and have your daughter’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits stopped with the month after she left your home. Be prepared to return all the money for months after that. If she either comes back to you or goes to Social Security herself to get her benefits, they can be reinstated and money issued for some of the past months. Note that given that she has no income available, she is likely receiving free shelter from the person she left with or someone else. This means that she is not eligible for the full SSI wherever she is. The most she is likely eligible for is $481 a month. To answer your question, if you were to hold the money for her and it turned out she was eligible for all of it, she would become ineligible due to excess resources the month following the month she went over $2,000.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Randy says:

      Clarification: In 2 months she will have $1,442 in her account. In 3 months it will grow to $2,163. Are we allowed to let her payments build up to the $2,000 threshold (as “assets”).. or are payments required to be fully spent each month. In other words, can she have $2,000 in “savings?” We still incur some expenses even though she’s not living here at the moment. We will refund every penny if directed to. However, as representative payees, we do not wish to incur any fines or penalties.

  104. Ana says:

    i am really afraid and scare, I had mailed and faxed my paid stubs when I started working never got a call or a letter. I kept getting the benefits. per the social security office they have not received any thing in 2 years. will I go to prison? I also got a car but when I called the social security office the women told me that as long as I was paying it with my income and not my son it was no problem. is that true? because I read that I was supposed to report and I never did. I also have gotten money put into my account for my brother and extra cash I got that I never reported. I just recently called to report my son is in a mental facility will I go to prison when I report everything they are asking for? I have no proof that I mail the pay stubs or fax them. please help should I get a lawyer? hope to hear from you asap. also my boyfriend moved in with me a few days ago and I am almost 2 months pregnant.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ana,

      Please clarify a few things for me before I attempt to respond.

      1. Who is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI)? You, your minor child, your adult child?
      2. If it is an adult child, are you his or her payee?
      3. You say that you had money put in your account for your brother. Do you mean that you were your brother’s representative payee?
      4. If so, in whose name was the account? Yours? Or your brother’s with your name on it as representative payee?
      5. How much extra cash did you receive and how often and from whom?

      If the person receiving SSI is you or is living with you, you do need to report the change in living arrangements and any change in who is paying the shelter and food expenses.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  105. Kathy says:

    Hi I would like to know can I apply for SSI for my 6 yr old daughter who was diagnosed with adhd. I am legally married..but I never lived with my husband. Can i apply as being single?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kathy,

      You can apply for your child and she will be approved if her ADHD is severe enough to consistute disability. Only the income of parents living with the child is considered in determining the child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  106. Ricky says:

    My boyfriend recently got out of prison. He reapplied for benefits and was set to start getting them again in November. He just got a letter saying that his dad, whom he is estranged from, died and he is therefore no longer eligible for benefits. The reason he is disabled is due to an injury from an incident that occurred when he was 19. So we’re not sure how his dad relates to him being able to get benefits.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ricky,

      If your boyfriend did not receive an inheritance that made him financially ineligible, I think that your boyfriend has become eligible for Social Security Disabled Adult Child benefits in an amount greater than his Supplemental Security Income (SSI). The benefit is payable to him as a survivor on his father’s Social Security earnings record. He needs to check with Social Security to be sure this is the case. Note that the benefits will stop if he gets married unless he marries someone who is also eligible for Disabled Adult Child benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  107. Kathy says:

    I get 721.00 a month in SSI payments. If I get married to a man that is getting 1265.00 a month in SSD payments, how much of my SSI will I lose.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kathy,

      You and your husband will not be eligible for federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) because the maximum SSI benefit for a couple is $1,082 and your couple income would exceed that by more than $20.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  108. NORMA EARLEY says:

    JUST NEEDED TO KNOW IF SOME ONE IS RECEIVING S S I AND DIES ON THE 30TH OF THE MONTH IS HE ELIGILBE FOR THE FOLLOWING MONTH BENEFITS FOR FUNERAL SERVICE PLEASE LET ME KNOW AS SOON AS POSSIBLE THE PAYEE MADE PAYMENT TO THE FUNERAL HOME BUT THEY WENT IN TO HER ACCOUNT A TOOT THE MONEY BACK WHICH WAS NOT HIS ITS WAS HER MONEY

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Norma,

      An individual receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) who dies in one month is not eligible for payment in the following month. If the person was receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI), the month of death, which is paid in the following month, is not payable. So either way, the payee will have to repay the SSI or Social Security money that was incorrectly used for funeral expenses.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Tatiana Sulava says:

        Hi my name is Tatiana Sulava. I receive survivors benefits from Social Security every month. I’m currently 7 months pregnant with my son and I’m raising him as a single mom. My question is once my son is born will Social Security reduce my benefits because of him or no?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Tatiana,

          If you are drawing benefits on a parent’s earnings record, the birth of your child will not affect benefits,assuming that your child is not your parent’s child.

          If you are drawing benefits on a deceased spouse’s earnings record and your child is a child of your deceased spouse; then, depending on the amount of the family maximum benefit, your benefits may be reduced when the child becomes entitled to benefits. However, the total amount the two of you receive might be more than you are receiving now.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  109. radost says:

    Hi Kay,
    I recently received a letter that my SSI benefit will be paid from SSA and the state therefore SSA will pay $721 and ny state will pay the $21. i have not seen the 21 yet. it has been few months since then. should i contact the state or is it done automatically?
    thank you so much for your help!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Radost,

      In some states the state supplement is administered by Social Security and payment is automatic. In other states, you have to apply. The Social Security office can tell you which is the case in your state. If the state must authorize the payment, follow up with the state.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • radost says:

        Thank you Kay!
        I live in NY. do you know the process for my state? thank you so much for your kind help!!

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Radost,

          I just learned that effective October 1, New York is administering their SSI state supplement. Previously, Social Security administered the payment. You need to contact the state. The supplement will be paid separately from the federal SSI.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  110. Josh says:

    Hello, I have a technical question about moving out of state. My mother did the SSI and medicaid applications for me, but passed away last year. So, am not sure what kind of documentation I may need to reapply for medicaid in Pennsylvania from Texas. Do I have to even reapply, considering SSI is a federal program and medicaid is tied to it? I’m so confused because some sites say it’s as easy as just reporting a change of address to the SS office, and others say you have to reapply. And unfortunately, I do not currently have my birth certificate or ss card since she passed away and they were lost. I remember my SSN, but I don’t have the card, so I’m stressing quite a lot over losing those and the possibility of not being able to get my medications if I were to move. That is, if I can get copies before the move.

    Thank you much

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Josh,

      If you are already receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you need to report your new address and provide information about your new living arrangement (who pays for shelter and food costs). In most states your Medicaid should be automatically transferred because you are receiving SSI. The Social Security office in your new state should be able to tell you whether you have to also contact the state about the Medicaid eligibility.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  111. Eric says:

    Hi,
    I have a question for you. I am receiving SSI and just found out a job I worked years ago has changed owners. They dug up a retirement fund I couldn’t find years ago and are going to send me a lump sum payment. How will this affect my ssi, I am going to use it on a down payment for a house if it is enough. I don’t know how much it will be or when I will get it even. I don’t want to get in any trouble.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Eric,

      Report receipt of the lump sum payment to the Social Security Administration as soon as you receive it. Also get a statement from the employer that explains that the new owners uncovered the retirement fund that you tried to unsuccessfully claim in the past and were told didn’t exist when the company was under other ownership. With that documentation, the pension plan should only count as income in the month you receive it and as a resource the month after if you still have the money the month after. You will not be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) that month or any following month if your assets are over $2,000 on the first of the month (over $3,000 if you are married). As soon as you spend the money for the down payment on a house that you live in, you will be eligible for benefits again the following month. (You will have an overpayment in the month the money is received so plan on repaying the SSI you receive for that month.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  112. concerned mom says:

    My son receives SSI benefits due to his severe physical disability/birth defects. The SSI journey has been a complete disaster. I noticed on our last revised report that was mailed to me that I am checked as NOT being in school, when in fact I’ve been enrolled as a full time student for the past 3 years working toward my Bachelors. Should I make the SSA aware that this information is wrong. Will it change any of his benefits. Do they take a parent being full time student/part time employee into consideration when calculating amounts?

    Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Concerned Mom,

      Your student status should not affect your son’s SSI benefits. If the questionnaire is an annual redetermination-of-eligibility form, the question applies to your son. If the form is a representative payee reporting form because you receive his benefits, then the question may be included to ascertain whether there is a likelihood of misuse of funds because the payee doesn’t have income. Correct any incorrect information. You can ask Social Security about the significance of the question.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  113. hylishia says:

    I was approved for ssi then someone call me and said it’s on hold cause they need information from myself empl I file my taxes and claim babysitting how do I give them this information if I don’t have all of it

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Hylishia,

      If you file a tax return to report your babysitting income, your tax return probably includes a Schedule C. They need to see a copy of your Schedule C. If you don’t have a copy of your return and used a tax preparer, the tax preparer should have a copy. For the current year, you need to figure out how much you have collected gross and how much your expenses have been (like you will do at the end of the year to file 2014 taxes) and give Social Security those figures so they can figure your profit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  114. Joy says:

    I get ssi for anxiety. My parents are deceased and I received a substantial amount of money from them. Will this effect my ssi benefits. I have it set up where I only receive 4,000 a month from their trust.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Joy,

      You are no longer eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Any unearned (non-work) income over $741 a month makes you ineligible. You need to report your inheritance and new income right away. Be prepared to provide a copy of the trust papers and to refund the SSI you received for all months from the time you first received the inheritance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  115. Adrienne says:

    16 year old is receiving his deceased father’s benefits. Mother was payee. Mother died. What do we do. 16 year old life with step father, step father did not adopt him nor is he legal guardian. How can step dad be his payee?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Adrienne,

      The sixteen-year-old’s stepfather can apply to be the payee and should do so right away. He should also apply for the boy to receive benefits on his mother’s Social Security account in the event that she was insured for the payment of survivor benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  116. Shelley says:

    I have a huge problem. My ex husband and I have 2 children together. My ex was on dialysis and worked part time. As a result, my two children received SSI from his claim in place of child support for many years. He since then had a kidney transplant and still only works part time. Apparently he did not keep them updated because now they want me to repay almost 30,000 dollars. My taxes were garnished last year and I am not allowed to list any exemptions on my paycheck. My ex said he is responsible and he is paying 100 a month from his SSI check (he’s in “emergency review” for past year). I am furious as this basically means I am returning child support and he is still getting payed by government even though he is healthy now. Can I sue him? I make too much to have the repayment forgiven but am by no means rich. I rent a house and drive a 10 year old car! What do I do?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Shelly,

      First, it sounds as if your ex-husband and your children have been receiving Social Security, not SSI (Supplemental Security Income). I presume that by “emergency review” you mean that he has filed an appeal on termination of his disability. If that is the case and your husband wins his appeal, the children’s eligibility will be reestablished and they will no longer be overpaid. Social Security should defer collection of the overpayment while the appeal pends.

      Also, if you filed a formal request for waiver and were denied and you are within the sixty-day appeal period, you can appeal based on the overpayment not being your fault and that collection would be unfair to you (rather than based on being financially unable to pay). You could make an argument that it is unfair to have to repay because you had no idea that the children weren’t eligible and so you could keep the overpayment from happening and that you lost the right to collect child support because of the children’s apparent entitlement to Social Security.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  117. nikki says:

    Sorry, i gave you old email address….I receive ssi for my teenage son and now he is discussing living part time with his father, can that affect the ssi I receive. Do I need to notify ssa if he is going back and forth from both households?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Nikki,

      Please see my response to your previous post. (All replies, except for requests for attorney representation, are answered on the Disability Advisor website, so your using an incorrect email address is no problem.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  118. nikki says:

    I receive ssi for my teenage son and now he is discussing living part time with his father, can that affect the ssi I receive. Do I need to notify ssa if he is going back and forth from both households?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Nikki,

      Regardless of where your son lives, you are responsible for using the money for his support. When a child lives back and forth between parents the situation is not clear cut. Figure out how much of the time he will be with you and and how much with his father and then report to Social Security. The income of the parent with whom your child lives is likely to be used in determining the amount of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) he receives and which parent serves as payee.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  119. MariahM says:

    Kate,
    The rental portion for my tenant is 1,700 not 17,000. This account has been opened before my son even collected SSI. However, they send a letter with this account as a reference to me having more then 1,700 in a account like I’m trying to keep things from them. I send them a letter telling them the account has been opened prior to my son receiving any SSI and that its the security deposit of the tenant and her name is on the paper work. They still denied the reconsideration and still want me to repay everything back. Im sorry for all the typos!!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mariah,

      Thank you for the additional information. I don’t think the $1,700 security deposit account is causing any of the overpayment because, even it they count it, the amount is below the asset limit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  120. MariahM says:

    Dear Kate

    I hope you can help me out. I have so much on my mind I hope it makes sense. My son was diagnosed with Autism in Nov of 2011. I immediately took a FMLA. My job was not paying me while i was out of work. in Feb 2012 I applied for SSI One of the things the representative asked me was how much was my mortgage I told her it was 1900 a month. That i was currently on a leave without pay. I decided that in March of 2012 I was not going to go back to my career as a Manager in a supermarket because my son Dr. had told me that he was going to need about 20 to 30 hours of intensive therapy a week. I tried having a discussion with my employer as far as going part time but they was not supportive. On march i made the hardest decision of my life. i decided to resign as a store manager and be a full time mom to my child. I remember crying and praying to God the day before I resign because I truly did not know how I was going to manage, how was i going to pay for our bills, how i was going to survive. I never been that vulnerable in my life. i always worked and have been able to provide a comftorble life for myself and my son. I was immediately approved for SSI by April and began collecting 720 that month. Since it was tax time i was able to collect money from that and also a bonus from my old job. By May of 2012 I was able to start collecting child support for my child around 390 a month. I was also approved for unemployment in July of that same year so they back paid me since January. Fast forward May of 2014 I get a letter to go and re certified my son case. This time while I’m talking to the representative she asked me again how much is my mortgage I explained to her around 1800. She then asked me well how you pay for it. I told her I have a two family and my tenant portion takes care of my mortgage. Now you should have seen my face after this lady told me that rental income was consider residual income, and because of this alone I probably should have never been receiving ssi in the first place. She also showed me the paper from the bonus I had received in April 2012, I told her it was a one time payment. Again i didn’t know this stuff was a issue until ii started doing my research. Any ways, If i would have has this representative in the first place I would probably not be on your blog typing this lengthy letter just because she would have told me everything I needed to know. I never been on public assistance prior to this, I never knew that rental income was against the rule. Call me naive, but i did not. I have always been honest with the ssi people. but if you don’t know something how can they just accused me of covering it up, our not been truthful. Again the rental income i collect covers my mortgage and thats it. My son ssi helps pay for his clothes, bills, food, and anything else that we might need in the house. SSI then send me a letter telling me that I should have never received ssi since the beginning, and they want me to pay over 15,000 back. I don’t have that type of money, if i did i wouldn’t be asking for there help in the first place.I am now aware after reading different blogs and hearing other people stories that you have to report everything to ss regardless if i thought it wasn’t important, our assumed the calculations where different because clearly they need to know everything. i was really under the impression that my son was still under 2,000 limit because he was only getting 390 plus 720. I never thought that my resource as his mother affected him because A. I was approved in the beginning my initial case worker never bother to tell me rental income was a issue, I was under the impression that if i don’t have 2,000 in money that is mind in the bank I will be fine. In the letter they make references to my tenant money which by law has to be in the back at all times, should they have knew this is the beginning, so why now they asking about a account that has always been there with my tenant and my name , telling me that i shouldn’t have had 17,00 in the account. what i am upset about now is that since the case worker never asked me how my mortgage is paid, why am i been looked at as the person responsible for everything . How I’m suppose to know if she never asked me… ….so now I’m just confused, upset, and depressed. will i have to sale my home to pay out this debt? i wanted to start a home business should i continue my dreams our should i not ? I tried finding a lawyer for this case but they all seemed not be interested, and have made me feel like I’m at fault from the very beggining. I said this again, i only answer what she asked, how I’m suppose to know if they didn’t ask me. i think they need to be more outspoken about things you can and cannot have during the interview process. How do I move forward from this. Should I call and just set up a payment plan for 15 our 25 a month because right now. the only money I’m getting is the 390 a month consistently, I started working per diem for a autism company this month my check was 75 for the whole month of September. I am trying to stay above water but i can’t make it like this. I want to know what you think i should do next. i will take partial blame since i should have reported the child support, and I only take this blame after reviewing my booklet in May after getting this letter. However, how can they blame me as far as the rental income situation when they knew i was on fmla and wasn’t getting any income at all…how else did she think i paid for my home. and how I’m suppose to know to disclosed that if she didn’t ask and i didn’t even know it was a issue. Please let me know what I should do next, I’m so lost and depressed over tis. I want this to be over, I want to move on with my life..and to be honest i rather struggle now without there assistance then to have to relieve our deal with them again once this issue is resolved. Instead of helping those who need to get by they want to penalize me for having a roof over my son head.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mariah,

      You can request waiver of collection of the overpayment. To be eligible for waiver you must both not be at fault in causing the overpayment and be unable to repay. Meeting the first requirement may be difficult for you. You do have the responsibility to know the reporting requirements for receiving the benefits and you would ordinarily have been given a list of those responsibilities along with the claim receipt when you applied and also as an enclosure with responsibilities with the approval letter. You were asked at the application whether you had any income (not just whether your child had income) and you did not report the rental income. Tax refunds are not income, but the bonus, unemployment benefits, and child support are and you did not report them. You might be able to make a case for the rental income not being your fault because it is true that the representative who took your application should have questioned you about how you were making the mortgage payment and you might not have thought of the rent as income because it was just covering the mortgage (though that’s a bit of a stretch.)

      However, underlying all this is the fact that you had a joint account, which you should have reported at application when you were asked to declare bank accounts. All moneys deposited to the account are accessible to you (whether you use them or not) unless there was some legal or contractual reason you couldn’t withdraw. To prove that you would have to have documentation. From the typographical error, I can’t tell whether the account has $1,700 or $17,000 in the account. Any month that it had over $4,000 in it, your son was not eligible. (You can have $2,000 in assets, then the excess goes toward your son’s $2,000 limit.) It is unusual to have a joint account with a tenant. If the account has something to do with the mortgage-lender requirements and you have written proof of that and only the rent goes into it, you might be able to make a case for not knowing that it was available to you or be able to prove that it was not available to you.

      You might also perhaps be able to make a case for the money not counting as cash income, but as in-kind income (which would only cause a reduction in your child’s income and not a full ineligibility as long as your other income and his did not combine to make him ineligible). To make this argument or the argument that you could not legally remove money from the joint account, you would have to appeal the amount of the overpayment. If you decide to do this, you would do it before or at the same time as requesting the waiver. Given the facts, the appeal is a long shot and even if you win and his benefits were recalculated, the reduced income combined with your and his other income could mean ineligibility in most, if not all, months.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  121. Kate Harris says:

    I’m very glad to have found your site. Thanks for answering questions.

    I owned a small house before marrying my ex-husband. It was fully paid for. According to our divorce papers, my ex-husband is supposed to make the $304 a month payment. (He agreed because he talked me into the loan before we found out he had Aspergers and would never be happy living with me.)

    For a couple of years now, I’ve been getting regular calls from the bank saying that foreclosure will be started in two weeks because he will be three months behind. $21,000 is still owed including late fees, so to try to gain more control over my life and not worry anymore about this loan, I need to sell the house. A real estate agent said I could maybe get $35,000 for it, but my sister is afraid to get an apartment with me if my SSI case is dropped because I have so much trouble getting hired. Will SSI drop my case, or just suspend my checks until they equal whatever the profit from the home sale is? Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kate,

      If the house sells for $35,000 and you owe $21,000, you would clear $14,000 and the SSI resource limit is $2,000. If you use the money to support yourself, to pay moving costs, and take care of other needs and debts within twelve months of when you receive funds from the sale of the house, your SSI will start again without your having to file a new application. If you are financially ineligible for more than twelve months, you will have to file a new application, which requires a full medical review and decision about medical eligibility. Note that giving any of the money away could extend the period of ineligibility.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  122. Tara says:

    Dear Kay,
    I am a mother of three children ages 9,13,16 and I have applied for ssi and
    ssd. I have a lawyer and he said were almost done with the case and he says I have a 99.5% of receiving my benefits. Now my question is how much would I be getting for myself and my 3 children?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tara,

      If you are approved for Social Security Disability (SSDI) and your family maximum benefit is higher than your primary benefit, the difference between the two will be paid to the three children. You can go to http://www.socialsecurity.gov/my account, create an account, and request an earnings statement, which will give you the amounts.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  123. Sonya Rae Chiasson says:

    I am the payee of a person just passed away yesterday 9/26/2014. Can I just send his debit card back to SSI?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sonya,

      You need to report the person’s death and provide proof of the date of death. I would also encourage you to turn in the card, not mail it back, especially if it has any funds remaining on it. It may be too late to stop the October payment onto the card, so getting a receipt for the returned card, which could effectively be returned money, would be a good idea. Also, I suggest that you check with Social Security to see if you have the right to use remaining money that was due before death to pay for final medical and/or burial expenses.

      Sincerely.
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Shavonne says:

      Hi I would like to no if I can collect tax returns if anyone gave me money I am on Social Security disability

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Shavonne,

        Receipt of refunded taxes does not affect any kind of disability benefit, either Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If you carry over part or all of the tax refund to the following month and the money puts you over the SSI resource limit, you will become ineligible for SSI until your resources again drop below the limit. The gift of money does not affect SSDI benefits. Unless the money is irregular or infrequent and is less than $60 in a calendar quarter, it will count as income for SSI benefit calculation.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  124. Joeanna says:

    If I help sponsor my soon to be husband will my son ssi check get cut off? Does my husband other Sponser income affect my son ssi? Do I have to report the joint Sponser income?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Joeanna,

      Your sponsoring your alien finance should not have a negative effect on your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment. If your son is not receiving the maximum SSI now, his SSI might go up because Social Security allows a predetermined amount to be allocated for alien sponsorship when calculating the amount of your income that is deemed available for the support of your son. It is possible that the sponsorship allocation could be reduced because you are splitting the sponsorship with another person. I don’t know whether the rules I am describing apply when you start to sponsor someone after your child is already eligible for SSI. I recommend that you discuss this with a claims representative at your Social Security office.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  125. Ben says:

    can you buy a car if you have SSI without it affecting your SSI?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ben,

      You are allowed to own one vehicle and still receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If you purchase the car with your own money, acquiring the car should not affect your benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  126. Susan says:

    my question is my step daughter gets 750 a month for disability. Her mom has been collecting it because she has lived with her. She just moved in with us and her mother is trying to tell us that we are not entitled to the whole check I was just wondering is anybody out there could help me out thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Susan,

      The money paid for your stepdaughter is to be entirely used for her care. Now that you and her father have custody, your father should apply to be payee for the child. If she is getting Supplemental Security Income (SSI), her new living arrangements, including her father’s income, will have to be evaluated to determine her ongoing eligibility and payment amount. Accordingly, you and your husband should report her move right away.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  127. mike says:

    Quick question I’m on ssi I get 720 now me and my girlfriend just had a baby do I got to report that to ssi? Also my rent is 700 my girl ant working at the moment will ssi help me or give me a raise do to us having an infint ya know to help me pay for bills thanks mike

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mike,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) does not pay dependent benefits. I suggest that you contact health and human services department of your state or county to see whether you can receive some cash support for your child or WIC vouchers for food for the child.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  128. Jill says:

    Hello,

    I am a single mother of 4, my son who is 5 is receiving SSI and he just received his back pay. I have no means of transportation, my son has school, dr. appts., therapy and other activities I need to get him to that sometimes we just cant make to because I have no car. My question is can I use some of that back pay money to buy a car if its going to benefit him to take him to the appointments he need to get to ?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jill,

      If the back pay was above a certain amount, it was probably paid into a “dedicated account.” One of the approved uses of money in a dedicated accouont is medical care, so it it possible that you can get permission to use some of the back pay to purchase transportation for medical care appointments. I suggest that you request permission to do so and find out whether the vehicle has to be put in the child’s name and, if so, whether that is possible in your state (check with the Department of Motor Vehicles). Whether or not the money had to be deposited to a dedicated account, I recommend that you get SSA’s approval in writing and ask the same questions about titling the car.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  129. xxMariaxx says:

    Dear Kay,

    Hi! I’ve read thru all of the questions everybody asked and surprisingly didn’t find anyone in our circumstance…so hence here I am. Right now I’m 39, unemployed & living with my 35yo employed(19./hr+O.T. sometimes) boyfriend and his parents. Things here have been tense to say the least for quite some time now. I’m praying that your response can help us all! I’m not Sure how many questions I’ll end up asking you but here goes…The situation is this, his mother is getting ssi b/c after moving to this country and working for a few years she had a debilitating slip and fall at work. Unfortunately she did not have enough work credits earned to qualify for ssdi and as such is on the revolving door of ssi. Her husband makes a 9.50/hr wage and to compound the problem does not speak or understand english well enough to be able to work anywhere other than the temporary manufacturing work thru an agency that has people he knows that speak his language who help him get as steady work as possible. They are both at age 60 or 61 respectively so the language thing will not be changing. I have not worked for more time than I care to admit and frankly I’m sick and tired of them judging me to be some lazy American woman who is living off their son and them…which I AM NOT AT ALL LAZY!!! Right now as far as benefits for her ssi she has told the ssa that her son and I dont live here and don’t pay anything towards the mortgage and utilities or food. That he comes home sometimes from florida and that he just has his permanent address here. Problem with that is that he is employed full time right here where we DO live and I’m really concerned that she is making a huge mistake not reporting this fact and her ssi being taken completely away which she really does need, out of a fear of losing a little bit of money if any at all. And as far as me trying to list on an application that I reside here that’s a no go and she wants me to use her friend’s address around the block whom I don’t know and I’m not comfortable with them receiving my mail as far as tax returns or anything with my social sec# on it. So my question is could you please explain in a very easy to understand way a couple of key things so I can figure out what I need to do for myself and my man without affecting her ssi? 1. How, if at all, will my boyfriend and I living here and being employed affect her ssi? 2. If he and I pay for our food separately and pay our share of the mortgage and utilities, which would be 2/4 of 4/4. How, or will that affect her ssi amount? We both have our own bank accounts and he pays in cash for our share. We do not share any accounts or have any bills in our names either separate or together or with them. She was getting the full benefit of 721.00 but for a reason im not clear about ssa says they overpaid her so they have reduced that amount to what im not sure. So here’s the big question…can we continue living here together and working and her still be able to continue to get her ssi benefit unaffected by us? If yes, HOW? PLEASE EXPLAIN IN DETAIL IF YOU KINDLY COULD. If no, what can we do so I can go back to work and she can get her benefits along with her husband and son working too? Do he and i have to move because he alone makes too much? We all really need a thorough explaination of how our income will or will not affect her ssi benefit. Please help me Kay im tired of being couped up in a small room like some 15 kid! I want to get back on track to saving for my retirement so i dont find myself in this exact situation at my parents ages like they have. I have always been very fiscally responsible and this situation is getting me to my witts end! I have never been as broke as i am now and it affecting my happiness my attitude and my relationship with the man i love. But here’s the kicker…after all that said, his mother wants him/us to pay all the bills to make up for a long time of not helping out, how the heck can we do that when she doesn’t even want to report us living here? From where i stand it seems and i may be wrong, that she is making the situation the way it is. She doesnt want me to claim this as my address but has threatened to sue me for the time i have stayed here when my man didn’t pay. When we went to florida to live for a few months almost everyday he got a phone call from one of them asking when he was coming back tomorrow the next day etc? I feel like they dont want to allow him to make his own way in life like they did for themselves and put all this guilt and pressure on him to help them so they can go back to their country to retire but meanwhile his best years are being spent feeling guilty for things in the past like a war in their country that he is not responsible for he was a kid and now after living scared as a 12 yr kid and having his whole life uprooted and changed they want him to foot the bill of their financial decisions to purchase a house and pay for it for them and just pay pay pay. We havent even been able to think about saving for our wedding much less a ring because of this. I dont know what to do to help us! So sorry for the novel length.

    Sincerely,

    Mariaxx

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Maria,

      If you and your boyfriend give his parents money for no more than half of the utilities (excluding cable and telephone) and half the rent (or mortgage and property taxes) and you and he buy your own food, your boyfriend’s mother’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments will not be affected. You could also pay other expenses such as cable and telephone as long as you pay directly to the company and do not give your boyfriend’s parents the money directly. Your boyfriend’s mother is legally responsible for reporting accurately who is living in the household and who is paying for shelter and food costs. You might get a post office box to keep peace in the family.

      Your income and your boyfriend’s income have no bearing on your boyfriend’s mother’s SSI benefits, so there is no reason for you not to look for work. Her husband’s income is considered in determining her benefits. She is supposed to report his earnings every month. She may be overpaid for failure to report on time.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  130. Mike says:

    I have been living with someone who gets SSI. I don’t pay their bills or rent, im just getting a free roof over my head. I found out they didn’t report me as living with them to social security and now I think I need to file for a SSD claim. If I do that will it hurt her benefits in anyway.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mike,

      If you are not contributing to household costs, your being in the household will not adversely affect your friend’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. If you are approved for Social Security and continue to live with your friend, you can pay your share and still not affect her benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  131. Jenny says:

    I need to know what will happen if I begin to work. Our household is on a fixed income. We get SSI for my son (17 y/o) and my husband, then I get welfare with cash & food stamps… If I begin to work making $1200 a month before taxes how much of their SSI be taken away or will they lose it completely??
    Help!!! I want to work because I’m tired of struggling but we can’t live off only my work income..

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jenny,

      Congratulations on getting into the work force. I estimate that your husband’s and your child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) might go down about $100 each; however, I recommend that you make an appointment with Social Security and have them do a sample calculation. Note that when your son turns eighteen, your income will no longer affect his SSI. If he pays his share of shelter and food expenses, he will be eligible for the maximum amount assuming he is considered disabled as an adult. Disability is defined differently for adults and children. Three or four months before his eighteenth birthday, you should apply for him to receive SSI as an adult.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  132. ndeck says:

    I moved to my country without telling the ss ,how can they know I moved

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ndeck,

      Depending on the type of benefit you receive and the country you are now in now, you may be eligible for continuation of benefits. I do not know specifically how Social Security will know you are out of the country, but there are many computer bases that interface for enforcement purposes. I recommend that you report your move.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  133. Jack says:

    Hi, I have a question that’s a bit complicated and goes beyond SSI benefits but I am hoping you can answer it or at least point me in the right direction. We live in Texas and I am engaged to a woman who gets SSI payments for two children, both of whom are autistic. I believe the total of the two checks comes out to $784 a month. She also gets Medicaid benefits through the state of Texas for herself and both kids. She has no income of her own and any income that comes to her is solely in the form of the SSI checks and her ex-husband’s child support, some $541 every two weeks. I myself am on SSDI and currently receive $750 a month. My question is, we would like to get married sometime in the near future and need to know–and I have been Googling this all night and not really getting anywhere–whether or not getting married would affect any of our income, primarily the SSI for the kids and my SSDI, and even more importantly the Medicaid, as that is what pays for the kids’ schooling and therapies and any other medical needs in addition to helping her maintain her diabetes–she is on an insulin pump. If she loses Medicaid, the kids’ schooling goes away and they have to go to a public school, which we have checked out and find it leaves much to be desired. Not to mention she can’t pay for her diabetic supplies. I checked into this once before, and while I didn’t completely understand the answer, I was told my income won’t be affected, which is fine, but it’s her I’m worried about. We love each other very much and want to be able to be married and enjoy the recognition of a married couple but we need to have our needs met as well. Please help if you have any answers or point us out to someone who might.

    Jack

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jack,

      Your income will be considered in determining your stepchildren’s eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). However, before any amount of your income is used in the calculation of their benefits, an amount of your income will be allocated for your support and the support of your wife (the children’s mother). currently the allocation for a couple is $1,082, so your income should not affect the children’s eligibility.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Jack says:

        Thank you Kay. That sets my mind at ease as per SSI benefits. But now what we wonder about is Medicaid. Medicaid, while ostensibly a federal program, varies from state to state and the big question is, would she lose her Medicaid for herself and her kids? She explains to me that she gets it because she is a mother to two disabled children. For whatever reason, Medicaid does not count the kids’ SSI or child support and since she really in actuality rents living space from her mother, they are considered two separate households and thus her mother’s income does not get counted either. But mine will. I attempted to contact Medicaid and got no answer that I could really use, but as I think of this logically I could see no way Medicaid would turn us down if a) we’re a separate household from her mother and b) the only income they would count is my SSDI. Even if they measure it gross, it’s only $820/month and net $750. Since I was turned down for full Medicaid despite my disability because I made something like $40/month over their income guidelines as a single person, I am thinking that $820 gross stretched amongst 4 people, one disabled man, two disabled kids, and a mom who should be on disability and has no income of her own (I am encouraging her regardless of what we decide to reapply for disability) would mean there’s no way Medicaid would turn us down. If anything they’d give me full Medicaid and extend it to them. Is this true? If it is, then there is no reason why we can’t get married from a perspective of her losing medical coverage, because she wouldn’t. I am eagerly awaiting your response.

        Jack

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Jack,

          The children’s Medicaid is likely to continue because their SSI is likely to continue; however, I do not know whether your fiance’s Medicaid will continue or you will be covered. You might try asking the Medicaid office again. Make the question simple; list the members of household as they will be if you marry, each person’s income and the source. As who will be in the income guidelines for Medicaid, or just as for the income limit for a married couple with two children on SSI.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  134. Ann says:

    Dear Kay,

    My ex-husband is receiving disability benefits. I believe he is also receiving benefits for my two teenage children (who are not disabled) who he has custody of. However, my daughter moved in with me more than two years ago even though we have not changed the custody status. If he has been receiving benefits for her for the past two years and not giving it to her or providing any kind of care or support for her, what kind of trouble can he get in? Also, if he is caught doing this, can her benefits be sent to me to direct on her behalf?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ann,

      You can apply to be payee for your daughter now that she is in your care. You can do this at your local Social Security office. You can also report that her father has not given your daughter or you any of the benefits to use for her care. It might be helpful for your daughter to make a statement to that effect also. Social Security may request that he repay the benefits. If he does, they can be reissued to you.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  135. Penny says:

    Dear Kay,

    I am guardian and rep payee for a mentally disabled family member. I haven’t “worked” for the past 3 years because her health, she needs constant care. I drive her to all her appointments and use my car for everything she needs. My car recently quit. We need a vehicle to get to and from all her appointments. I’ve read that I can use her SSI / SSA as downpayment. My question is, (because the car has to be in her name) Can I get a loan in her name?…She doesn’t have a drivers license, and isn’t competent enough to drive or understand terms of a loan. I can’t work to pay for a car because I am her nurse 24/7. How does all that work?

    I keep hearing rumors of a program that pays family to be caregivers. But as a rep payee, I’m not allowed to profit from her, right? Is there such a program where the state pays caregivers?

    Another question, I dread the thought of it, but I know that in the future she will have final expenses. If I preplan with the funeral director and set up a payment plan, using her SSI to pay- How will this effect the monthly amount she receives? Is there a limit? I know she is allowed $1500 burial, but when I had it in a savings account, SSA penalized her for having too much money. Will she be penalized for having a burial plan that is adequate enough to actually cover her funeral? Is it considered an asset?

    Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Penny,

      I am assuming that your relative is an adult and my response is based on that assumption. I’m not an expert on car loans, but I think that your relative can own a car without having a driver’s license or being able to drive. She would just have to qualify for the loan financially, which would be up to the lender. She can purchase an irrevocable burial or cremation plan for up to $1,500 and the plan will not count toward the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit.

      Some states do have programs that will pay a relative caretaker a small amount for caring for a relative. I suggest that you check with your state and/or county health and human services department to see what is available. While it is true that you cannot use your relative’s SSI payments for your own needs, there is no prohibition against you earning money for work you perform, so your being paid to care for your relative should not affect her benefits or break the law.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  136. Krys says:

    Hi Kay! I recently got married and I was wondering if I need to report changes for my daughter sense I am her payee. She receives ssi because her father passed away in 2008. Will me getting married affect her ssi income?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Krys,

      If your daughter is receiving benefits because her father passed away, not because she is disabled, then she is not receiving SSI (Supplemental Security Income); she is receiving Social Security survivor benefits. If that is the case, you do not have to report your marriage.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Krys says:

        But I do need to report my name change for myself because I am the payee right?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Krys,

          Yes, you should report your name change so that the payments will be issued in the correct name. If you are having the benefits go to a bank account, you will need to change your name at the bank also.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  137. Karen says:

    Our son wants to move out and become his own payee. My husband is currently his payee. He is looking into apt. for the disabled. He has Asperger’s and we believe he is ready to be on his own. How does he get his money himself or should my husband still continue to make sure he pays his own bills and rent.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Karen,

      I suggest that your son and your husband go to the Social Security Administration together for your son to file to be his own payee.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  138. Jasmine says:

    Im 24 My Mom Is my Payee I Get Ssi Because I have. Rare Blood Disorder I’m Currently Trying To Move Out And Find My Own Independence But I Don’t Know How Or If I Can Get My Ssi Check In my Name..I’m Lost And Confusednd Prettu Much Don’t Know Wat too Do.. Why Pay My WHOLE Check For Rent At Her House When I Can Try N Branch Out And Pay Rent At My OWN Home And She Doesn’t Help Me AT ALL To Try n Be Independent So PLEASEEEEE Wat Can I Do ???????????

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jasmine,

      You can apply to be your own payee for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), but even if you are made your own payee, you do need to pay rent at market value or pay your share of shelter and food expenses if you continue to live with your mother. Otherwise, your SSI payment will be reduced because you will be getting free or subsidized shelter. I suggest that you talk with local social service agencies to see if there are any agencies that can help you to relocate to your own apartment. You might apply for public housing, where rent is based on one-third of your income.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  139. Melissa Tillman says:

    I got divorced from my sons father in 2009. My son who is 14 receives Ssi and medicaid. If I were to remarry (not biological father) would my son lose all benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Melissa,

      If you remarry and live with your husband and your son, your son’s eligibility for Supplemental Security Income and Medicaid will be redetermined considering your husband’s (your son’s stepfather’s) income and resources.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  140. April says:

    My daughter is 10 & receives SSI Disability. My husband is the only one working. He now makes around $67,000/year salary. There’s 5 people in our family will my daughters benefits discontinue? We live in MN.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear April,

      I believe that your husband’s income is about $12,000 a year above the SSI income limits. You need to report his work as soon as possible and not accept any further SSI payments.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  141. Terrell says:

    I’m 22 and been going through a hard time after being laid off. Right now I have no food. I got a letter a couple of years ago saying I owe social security people a lot of money but I never saw any money from them. My refund Check was even taken cause of this. My dad had control of my SSI checks because I saw them once in the mail when I lived with him when I was 17. I tried to get unemployment and food stamps but can’t cause of this social security mess. Why am I being punished for my dad’s crime? He won’t even help me with a little grocery money. I don’t know what to do. Do you have any advice?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Terrell,

      I suggest that you talk with the Social Security Administration and file a request to have collection of the overpayment waived because you were a minor when you were apparently overpaid and that you were unaware of the overpayment and can’t afford to repay. In the meantime, I suggest that you go to a local food bank or food pantry either run by the city, county or a church or non-profit to try to get a food box. Also some churches and non-profits such as the Salvation Army run free meal programs. You might also see whether there is a free legal aid office that could offer legal advice about the situation.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  142. Marie says:

    how do i get a copy of my son ssi. i no i could call but i rather look it up myself. please help

  143. Andrea' says:

    So I filed a waiver application for overpayment of a large amount back in Dec. 2013. I just got a letter from social security saying they need to conduct a personal conference on the waiver I submitted. What would they need to talk by phone for? Also I work earlier and later than the hours they are open! What then? Any suggestions or any reason why they would need to talk to me? They have all the information on the application.
    Thanks
    Andrea’

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Andrea,

      I suggest that you make arrangements to take an hour off work so that you can make and keep the requested appointment for a telephone conference about your request for waiver of collection of your overpayment. The Social Security Administration (SSA) is requesting the interview because they have some questions to ask to help them to determine whether you qualify for waiver of repayment.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  144. Rachel says:

    Hi, I have a question! I’m 23, currently living with my parents, and on disability. Up until now I had only been responsible for paying my parents a small amount of money for rent, so I had been receiving about ~$400. However, my mother has recently decided to leave my father, and wants to live on her own, meaning without me as well. The lease (which I am also on) ends in November. I’m freaking out because I only have about two months to find someplace to live, and I’m assuming I will now qualify for an increase, as I will have no income and no assistance from anyone … but is it possible for the increase to happen before the actual move? I can’t see how it’s feasible for me to find a room/apartment otherwise, with my current benefits and the timetable. Oh, and I have already applied for low-income housing as of several months ago, but I am still extremely low on the waiting list in my state. I just don’t want to be homeless come November. Thank you for any help.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rachael,

      When you stop receiving in-kind support, your benefits increase two months later. Perhaps your best choice is to apply for food stamps to cover your food and rent in a private house at least until you get the increase. The maximum federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment is $721 monthly. Some states have offers a small supplemental SSI payment as well.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  145. Jessica says:

    If someone is staying with a friend as a roommate and receive ssi dothey go by that friend income and is it good for the other roommate to write an agreement saying how much they pay to live in there place?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jessica,

      Please see my response to your earlier question. The new roommate does need to write a statement regarding how much the person receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is paying for room and board or, if sharing expenses, regarding the amount of the shelter and food expenses and the amount the SSI recipient is paying toward the expenses.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  146. Glenn Rosa says:

    I sent some questions on August 30th just wondering if you received them Kay.

  147. Kim says:

    Hello,
    My question is if one who is receiving SSI gifts or gives his primary and only vehicle to another family member (releases title, paperwork, etc), would this information need to be reported to ssi and would there be any ramifiations involved with ssi payment? There will be no money exchanged because the vehicle will be gifted. This is due to not being able to take care of the car and physically unable to drive it. Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kim,

      You need to report the change to Social Security; however, giving away the car should not affect your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment because the car was an excluded resource and didn’t count toward your resource limit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  148. JEAN says:

    WHAT IF YOU RECEIVE SSI BUT DID NOT REPORT THAT YOU HAVE CHILDREN. WHAT WOULD HAPPEN?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jean,

      If you are receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI), you should report your children immediately so that it can be determined whether they are also eligible for a benefit. If you are receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and the children live with you, you should correct the record. However, unless you are married and your spouse’s income is being considered in determining your benefit amount, having children in the household will not affect your benefit. Also SSI does not pay dependents benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  149. Isa Karma says:

    My Adult disabled son was just approved for SSI. I am his representative Payee. His benefit was reduced by $240 because he lives with me (value of food and shelter). So does this mean that I cannot use any of the money for food — even if $240 doesn’t cover all the food he eats? What if he decides to eat at restaurants 2 times a week – can I apply money he receives towards this? Do I categorize as food/shelter or Entertainment? I am confused on this.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Isa,

      You are expected to use your son’s benefits for shelter, food, clothing, medical and dental co-pays, personal care items, transportation (and entertainment if funds are available). I believe that only food consumed in the household can be counted toward food purchases for the purposes of establishing that he is now paying at least part of his share of shelter and food costs. (Check this with the Social Security Administration.) I suggest that you work out a spending plan for the money he is receiving. If he is now paying his share or within less than $240 of his share, then he will be eligible for a raise in SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  150. Bill McClaren says:

    Dear Kay:

    My 80 year old father has been on SSI for around 20 years. Two years ago, he inherited a house in which he is still living. When he first got the house, he started bugging me to find a way for “the state not to take the house when he dies”. I don’t like talking about those things and never looked into it. Now his health is deteriorating and he’s fanatical about this issue. He has some acquaintances that have told him that the state will seize the house upon his death to repay for all of the medical treatment he has received. He is so worried about it that he is trying to convince a 40 year old drug addict/prostitute he knows into marrying him. When I told him I considered this unwise, he informed me that she has promised she’ll let me use the house whenever I want to when he’s gone. In addition to this young woman’s addiction, she readily admits to many mental problems and admits herself into mental health facilities at least 4 or 5 times each month. My father claims that his goal is still to save the house for me. My question is as follows: What if anything can he do to devise the house to me, either now or upon his death without the state seizing it? I am flattered that my Dad wants to leave me the house, but even more so, I don’t want him to marry this girl. He has no relationship with this girl and I can only foresee trouble. She has two boyfriends already that are very shady characters. I don’t know if this detail matters, but the value of the house is approximately $80,000, it’s in California in a very rural area, and the real estate market is dead there.
    Thank you so much for your help.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Bill,

      The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program will not seize the house upon your father’s death. If he has been receiving Medicaid benefits, then you need to contact the Medicaid office to find out whether the state has a right to recoup some of its expenditures by taking ownership of the house.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  151. Debra says:

    I was recently approved for SSI on a claim I filed over a year ago after an appeal.. I have a few questions:

    If I was noted on a checking and savings (have been for over 20 yrs) account of someone not my spouse or partner but roommate and have not had an income for over 11 years, can that be considered as a resource for me If I recently obtained my own account me?

    If I owed over $30,000.00 in personal loans and repaid more than 1/2 back after receiving a 1 time beneficiary annuity gift/payment from a deceased aunt, should I become ineligible to receive SSI benefits & why?

    Would this be considered a personal loan by SSI: If someone purchases/finances a car I put the down payment on the car and made payments, with an agreement with the other party that the payments are to be made by me. I become ill and no longer able to make the payments, the other person assumes payments (with an agreement to be repaid by me) until car is paid off and upon my repaying them in full for paying off the car, the pink will be signed over to, me why would I be found ineligible to receive SSI benefits?

    I thank you in advance for any input you may have

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Debra,

      For determining eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), all money deposited to the account with your name on it is income to you in the month that the deposits were made. Any money in the account on the first of the month that was carried over from the prior month will count toward the SSI resource limit for that month. If you use all of the inheritance (or enough of it to reduce all your countable resources to $2,000) in the same month as you receive the inheritance, the inheritance will affect your SSI only in the month it was received. You will be required to get proof of repayment of all the loans.

      To answer your question about the car, I need to know whether the car was initially purchased in the other person’s name, your name, or both your names.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Debra says:

        Dear Kay:

        I truly appreciate your response and to answer your question regarding the car; The car was financed in the other persons name with an agreement/contract entered into/between me and the other person that I would be obligated to them to pay any and all cost such as insurance, maintenance, registration, etc…

        The Car has been paid off, when I have repaid the outstanding balance/debt/personal loan of $5,000.00 in full the title/pink slip for the vehicle will be signed over to me.

        The only proof I have as repayment of the loan(s) is a signed statement from the other person, and the original agreement/contract entered into/between the other person and me for the personal loan.

        The inheritance was used to repay the majority of the loan and I am no longer on the account.

        Again I thank you for taking the time to help confused little old me.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Debra,

          Your situation with the car is quite unusual. You will have to take all this information to the Social Security Administration (SSA) and have them make a ruling. That said, here is my take on it: Essentially you have been buying the car from the other person; first you made payments and then you used inheritance money for a final lump sum payment to cover the other person’s original investment. If SSA also interprets that you have been buying the car all along, then using the inheritance money to finish paying off the car should not have any negative effect on your eligibility for SSI. When you tell SSA about the car and use of the inheritance money, take all the documents surrounding the car including the original written agreement.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Debra says:

            I have already submitted to SSA all that you’ve stated above beforehand I am now waiting to hear from them.

            What you are doing to help those of us that have doubt and are confused about the SSA process is a wonderful thing.

            Thank you so much Kay for your advice and service.

          • Kay Derochie says:

            You are welcome, Debra.

  152. Glenn Rosa says:

    One more question. Does the money my son receives must go into a account assigned to his name with his mother as custodian parent? Right now my sons money goes direct deposit into his mother’s savings account. I argued with her stating the money should go into a joint account my sons name and his mother’s name. She insists she won’t do it. Whose right and whose wrong?

    Thanks,
    Glenn Rosa

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Glenn,

      Social Security usually requires that a child’s benefits go into a bank account titled “your son’s name by his mother’s name, representative payee.” She should keep the money separate from hers because she has to account to Social Security for how it has been used and show that it was all used for your son’s shelter, food, clothing, school supplies, medical care, etc.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  153. Glenn Rosa says:

    Hi Kay,
    I need your advice please. I am 53 years old
    on SSD my sons mother on his behalf receives
    an amount as well. My question is I can hardly make
    ends meet with my SSD. Can my amount be increased
    showing hardship on my part and does my sons amount
    get decreased if I get an increase? We are not married
    nor live in the same household. My total family maximum
    benefit was listed as no more than 3,000. I receive 1644
    my son receives 870. If I win and get the increase, how will
    the new amounts look? Does my son receive less because
    I receive more?

    Thanks God Bless
    Glenn Rosa

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Glenn,

      Your Social Security Disability (SSDI) will be increased only if there is an annual cost-of-living adjustment or if you recently became disabled and recent work earnings have not been credited. Your son’s benefit is one-half of yours. If yours were to increase, so would his.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Glenn Rosa says:

        One more question Kay and thanks for your info. Can I get and increase in SSDI if I show hardship which I have in paying my rent and expenses. I have been on Disability for 3 years now and things are tougher now.

        Regards,
        Glenn

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Glenn,

          Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits are calculated based on your earnings history, so there is no opportunity for the amount to increase other than possible annual cost-of-living adjustments, which are announced in November or December of each year. You might see if you qualify for SNAP (food stamps), utility assistance, or subsidized housing. Your county’s or state’s health and human services department may be able to tell you about programs for which you might qualify.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  154. brittany says:

    Hi, I have been getting ssi for my son 1 year and 4 months now but yesterday his money wasnt on the card and i havnt recieved and mail from ssi at all. I just had a baby in june and didnt report it to ssi but idk if this can be why his money is not on his card. No income change and no other changes other than my new baby. What can be the reason why his money is not on his card? PleaseHelp

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Brittany,

      You need to contact your local Social Security office and report non-receipt of benefits. The birth of a second child would not reduce or terminate your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If you do have income yourself, a second child could increase your son’s SSI if he is not already getting the maximum.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  155. heather says:

    hello I am about to receive suplemental security income . My babies father owns a house he inherited and its paid off . My babies father is also going to be my payee bc I cant manage money . Is it ok if I rent it from him to rent to me ? Is it ok if he and our son live in the house ? Do I need to live alone ? My babies father has no income bc he had cancer .. but he helps watch me and the baby .

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Heather,

      If you and your baby live in the house alone and pay market value for the rent and pay your utilities and food costs, you can rent the house without its affecting your Supplemental Security Income. If your baby’s father lives in the house with you and your child, to avoid a reduction in benefits, you have to pay at least one-third of the property taxes and utilities (excluding phone and cable) and either buy your food separately or pay for one-third of the food.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • heather says:

        So it ok if I rent the house from my babies daddy ? Even if he ownes it ? Even if he is my payee ? So should he writte a lease agreement for me ? Does my babies daady have to live with me to be my payee bc he has another kid and his own place . . Were friends and hes nice and always seeing our kid .. but we could use space …

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Heather,

          Your friend does not have to live with you to be your payee. There is no reason you can’t rent from him; however, it is a good idea to have a written rental agreement.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

      • heather says:

        So I can pay rent to my baby dad ( my payee ) even though he is the home owner ? We decided He will not be living with me , but will be watching me and our son during the days .

  156. Virginia says:

    My brother is in a LTC facility in California. He receives SSDI but his share of cost is only $30.00 a month at the facility. The balance of his SSDI is building up in his bank account. I am his POA and I pay his bills. My question is: Does he have too much in his bank? What is his limit a year? Should I start spending it for his needs? Do I file taxes for him?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Virginia,

      If your brother is receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI) and not Supplemental Security Income (SSI), there is no limit to the amount of savings he can have. You should use some of the the money for his needs. I would also double check that his share of the costs is $30. Unless he has long-term care insurance, usually all a person’s income but $30 has to be used to pay for the care. With regard to taxes, I suggest that you discuss your brother’s income with a tax accountant to see what filing is necessary.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  157. Joe says:

    Hi,

    I have 2 children diagnosed with autism who each receive $721 per month. I just got a job making $52,500 a year ( I was unemployed for a while before); our family is 5: myself, my wife, my eldest son (no disability) and the two children with autism. How do I figure out what my children’s SSI payments will be reduced to?

    Thanks,

    Joe

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Joe,

      You are now earning enough that your children’s benefits will definitely be reduced. You need to report your new job right away taking verification of your start date and wages. Social Security will recalculate the children’s benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  158. Marie says:

    WOW! THANK U SO MUCH THAT WAS SUCH A GREAT HELP.. THIS IS THE BEST INFORMATION N ALL I HAD TO DO WAS ASK AND U REPLY BACK FAST. AGAIN THANK U! THANK U! THANK U

  159. Marie says:

    so does that mean i cant work a full time and part time job… whats the most i can make without them cutting me completely off…

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marie,

      Federal SSI can be paid as long as your child is eligible for at least one dollar. As explained in my previous response, you can earn up to about $3,000 before your son is completely ineligible. Every two dollars you earn over about $1,500 will result in a one dollar reduction in his benefit. You can figure out your gross monthly earnings by multiplying your rate of pay times the number of hours you will be working each month.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  160. Marie says:

    My 5 yr old son receive benefits and i started working 8/5/14. How long do u have to report change in income and could i report change over the phone or do i need to go to main office in my area. what is the most i could make a month and will they cut me off if i make to much. Its just me n my son.

    • Marie says:

      by the way i just received my first check as of today 8-25-14

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marie,

      You should report the change in income in the same month that it occurs (August). You can report the change by phone, but you will have to also submit proof of the date you started working and the amount of your earnings. Thereafter, you will have to report your earnings monthly. A reduction in Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits will begin to occur when your earnings reach about $1,500 gross per month and your son will become ineligible for SSI when your work earnings reach about $3,000.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  161. MrSexyBlueEyes says:

    OH BTW HI EVERYONE

  162. MrSexyBlueEyes says:

    I AM SO CONFUSE ABOUT ALL OF IT I STARTED GET SSI/SSA BACK IN 2012 And I still get it I have so much problems I just dunno wat to do u am visiting in TEXAS And I need to know if I hace to start over or if I decide to live there??? Can my payee (Mother) still ve my Payee???

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear MrSexyBlueEyes,

      If you are visiting and will not be in Texas an entire calendar month you do not need to report your visit to Social Security. If you are going to be there a full month, such as arriving in July and leaving in September, you must report the change. You don’t need to file a new claim, but the amount of your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit has to be reviewed based on your living arrangements in Texas. You mother can continue to be your payee if she is able to pay your bills and knows what your needs are and take care of them from where she is living. (Note that you would not have to report your visit if you were receiving only Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  163. Yojharis says:

    Hhello., I’m The representative payee of my son! I call social security to ask question bout how his reconsideration process was going they say he will be recovery his benefits but I will No longer will be his regressive and they will send me a letter bout it? Any reason why they would do that I’m they custodial parent! Is anything else I Can do?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Yojharis,

      If your son is now eighteen and mentally competent, he will be his own payee. If he is under eighteen or not capable of handling his benefits, you can go to Social Security and ask to continue to be his payee because he lives with you. Social Security decides who will be payee and the decision cannot be appealed, but you can explain all the reasons why you should be payee.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Yojharis says:

        I dont know what to do im really confuse he is 13 !!any advice any paperwork i shoul take down to the office ? Im have custody if him and drive myself crazy thinkin why they want change me as his payee .. I was thinkin if they dont want me to be anymore can i tell them to ñame ny mother? And should i take ny son wit me when i go down there so they can i ask him question ??? Please help me any advice thanks so much

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Yojharis,

          The only way to find out why a change in payee is being planned is to go into Social Security to discuss it. You do not need to take your son, although you can if you wish. You could propose your mother as payee in your place. If you do, she should go with you.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  164. jamil says:

    Hey Kay, I’m about to turn 18 in a couple of weeks and my grandmother who is my guardian handles my ssi. But I have have recently moved in with my father at the beginning of June. I was wondering how I could get my check to come directly to me instead of my grandma before my birthday which is on the first of next month. Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jamil,

      You can apply to be your own payee now although, if the request is granted, the change may not take place until you are eighteen. Have you applied to have your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) continued as an adult? If you haven’t as yet, you and your grandmother should make that application as soon as possible.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  165. Keysa says:

    Hi Kay
    if you get ssdi for your kids can someone claim them on their
    taxes ie. your Spouse or do you have to do taxes if you worked half a
    year be for being approved. In the Future can your Spouse claim them
    on their taxes?

  166. John says:

    I am asking a question for a brother. Okay my brother married this lady who receives ssi from her deceased mum , he is currently not working and planning on moving in with her. is wife already lost part of the benefit since she is married.. He wants to know what would happened if he moves in with her but he is not working at this time.. would that cause his wife to loose all the benefit being the fact that he moved in with her, but he has no income at this point.

    thank you ..

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear John,

      Your brother’s wife has apparently been receiving Disabled Adult Child Social Security benefits, not Supplemental Security Income (SSI). She became ineligible when she got married and needs to report the marriage right away.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  167. Michelle says:

    I have a question, my son is on SSI and his dad is on SSD but he is under his mom’s name she is his res. payee if he moves in with us will that affect my son’s SSI?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Michelle,

      I am understanding from your question that your son lives with you and you are asking about your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) if his father were to move in. My response is based on that understanding. Your son’s financial eligibility will be redetermined considering his father’s income and resources in addition to yours. Depending on the amount of his father’s Social Security, your son’s SSI could be reduced or stop. I suggest that you ask Social Security to give you an estimate calculatiion of your son’s SSI before his father moves in so that you will know the impact in advance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  168. Keysa says:

    Hi Kay if you on ssdi will your benefit decrease if you get married and at what combined income level must we file a federal income tax.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Keysa,

      Your Social Security Disability (SSDI) will not decrease when you get married. Part of your Social Security will be taxable if your and your husband’s adjusted gross income is over $32,000. The IRS can provide a worksheet for you to calculate how much of your Social Security would be taxable.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  169. Nia says:

    Hi, I get ssi through my mother because she is disabled and I am 17. Is it true that I will continue to receive benefits as long as I stay in school like go to trade school or college. Also will my benefits be affected if I get a part time job I receive $726

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Nia,

      Your dependent benefits will continue through the later of the date you turn eighteen or if you are still in high school age nineteen. No benefits are paid while you go to a trade school or college unless you are still under age eighteen. While receiving benefits, you can earn up to $15,480 a year before your benefits are affected.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  170. Lola says:

    My child gets SSI and usually lives with me. If he goes and stays with his dad for over 50% of a month, do I have to claim this and will I loose the benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lola,

      The Social Security Administration (SSA) may consider your child’s primary residence to be with his father because he lives there more than half the time. If so, his father’s income, not yours, will be considered in determining your son’s SSI disability. You need to report the situation to SSA as soon as possible.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  171. Mimi says:

    Hi, I have a question that I’m receiving ssi for 290 each month and I live in someone house for free but now, they can’t let me to live there for free anymore, and I have to move out. I want to rent an apartment for 650. The thing is I don’t have any income. What should I do? Will my ssi payment increase? . Can someone cosign me to rent an apartment? Do it affect my benefit? Thank you for understanding my questions.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mimi,

      If you are receiving $290 in Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you must have some income other than free food and/or housing because the maximum reduction for free food and/or housing results in a benefit of $481. Changes in countable income affect your SSI payment amount two months after the change occurs. For example, if you stop receiving free food or shelter in September, your SSI would not go up until November.

      You could move into an apartment and share it with other people. If you pay your share of rent and utilities (excluding phone and cable) and pay for food with food stamps, your SSI would go up in two months. At that point in time, you would have more income and could consider whether you have sufficient finances to live alone. (Your share is one-half if two people are sharing housing; one-third if three people are sharing, and so on.) If someone who is not living with you pays the rent, it will be income to you and result in a reduction in SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  172. B. L. says:

    I am a medicaid service coordinator. I have a consumer who receives SSI benefits due to his disability. He is currently in the hospital and has been now for several months. His grandmother would like to know if she should notify the Social Security Administration about his extended hospital stay? Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear B.L.,

      Yes, your client’s grandmother should report the change right away. It is likely that her grandson is substantially overpaid.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  173. CeCe says:

    You are seriously incredible Kay Derochie.
    I appreciate you so much.
    Thank you for the great advice!

  174. Gloria says:

    Why is social security staying so low? Why does the federal government allocate 35-40grand per prisoner and disabled people who can barely work are forced to live on well below 10 grand a year? Do they plan on fixing this? Many people I know who are disable are loosing their children and apartments due to the inability to pay rent bills and purchase food. Will the department of social security do anything better for the American citizen? The defense department the border patrol and the war on drugs uses more collectively then poor disabled citizens. It’s so hard to finds place to live. Is there a group or a lawyer or a coalition that could hear our voices so they could see how hard it is to get to a food pantry or buy children clothes on this income. The threats of not having any assets are constant… Maybe rich families who use the system for their kids could be pushed off rather then nearly homeless poverty stricken disabled folks who are so many pharmaceuticals we keep them in business. I’m wanting a reform because I have a disability it looks like a seizure but it’s a mini stroke and employers have begged me to leave. I keep trying and I keep meeting discrimination. I feel I can’t afford to live on this income I am grateful for it but surely something can be done?

  175. virdie johnson says:

    my question is if a married couple with the husband recieving ssi f 721.00 and their rent is 525.oo monthly thats not including electri and water if the wife returs to part time work how many hours is she able to work without affecting his checl

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Der Virdie,

      The number of hours you can work before affecting your husband’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment amount depends on the rate of pay per hour. I believe that if you have no minor children in the household and neither of you has unearned income, you can earn about $807 per month before causing a reduction in your husband’s benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  176. Dan says:

    What a great resource, thank you Kay! I have two questions:

    1. I have an 8 year old son receiving SSI. His mother (also disabled) is the representative payee, and we are divorcing. We have joint legal and physical custody. The final divorce judgement stipulates that his SSI be divided between the parents. There is no child support ordered in the final judgement.

    My ex wife is insisting that I create a special needs trust to receive the court ordered share of his SSI, to protect his eligibility. I don’t believe there is any need for that. If anything a separate joint account in his name and mine for recording purposes seems adequate. What are your thoughts? She did create a (d)(4)(A) special needs trust for him, for the temporary child support I was previously paying to flow through, along with his benefits, with the goal of also protecting her benefits (not of concern to me).

    2. The divorce judgement now requires that we sell the martial home which she had been residing in, as she has been unable to refinance in sufficient time. When we do sell, she will have a cash balance of nearly $300k and I will have a cash balance of nearly $200k. Presumably, we will both reinvest in new homes at some point, though it may take some time given how badly the 4 year divorce has impacted our credit scores. Obviously, this puts us over the asset limit at least until we both purchase homes.

    Is there any way to preserve, put on hold, or restore our son’s eligibility for SSI, and more importantly, Medicaid?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dan,

      If the custodial parent (the parent in the home Social Security determines is your son’s residence) buys a home and his or her assets drop below $4,000 (the parent can have $2,000 and the excess counts toward the child’s $2,000 limit) within less than a year of your son becoming ineligible due to the parent’s excess resources, his SSI can start again without a new application and new medical approval.

      As far as the trust account goes, that is between you and the child’s mother. One option is to set up a bank account with the title “you son’s name by your name,” which shows the money belongs to your son buy only you have access to it. Social Security requires the representative payee to account for the use of the child’s funds. You should be prepared to give your ex-wife a receipt or other proof of receiving the money each month and you also need to track how the money is spent for the child (housing, food, clothing, school supplies, medical care, recreation, etc. so that you can give her a copy once a year when she has to account for funds.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  177. sherica says:

    I receive 321.47 per month in ssi for my son , I have one other child and I am pregnant with my third . I no longer work and have started paying 350.00 per month for rent at my grandparents home. My question is with me paying some rent will my sons benefits increase or stay the same?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sherica,

      Your son’s SSI might increase if you are using his SSI to pay rent and your income has stopped. You need to report these changes to the Social Security Administration and have them determine whether an increase is payable. Provide a letter from your grandparents that confirms your son is paying rent and take proof of when you stopped working. If you are getting unemployment, that needs to be reported also.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  178. CeCe says:

    Sorry again for the long note. I believe you would have answered me.
    God heard me! God helped me! God is a Present Help!
    They put it through and are now only wrong for paying me the wrong amount.

  179. Gabriel says:

    My question is my daughter is 15 yrs old & receiving ssdi benefits and my girlfriend has a pending case of Ssi & ssdi and her and I want to live together. If my girlfriend is approved and she moves in with my daughter and I , who’s bennifits would be affected and if affected what percentage would it affect. My daughter recieves $721.00 a month .

    • Kay Derochie says:

      As long as you and your girlfriend are not married, her income will not affect your daughter’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits (I don’t think your daughter is getting Social Security Disability [SSDI].) As long as your girlfriend pays her share of shelter and food expenses, but not more than her share, no one’s SSI will be affected. If your girlfriend is approved for SSDI, it will not be affected by where she lives or with whom.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  180. CeCe says:

    I am at my wits end. Please help me, please.
    Such a long story but I will try to shorten it as best I can.
    My son was considered absent from the household and attending school paid for by the Board of Ed. I was also back and forth between NY and Florida. Primary address and benefit was from NY.
    I went into the Fl. office on March 10th to tell them that I was bringing my son home for a few months, took in my lease explaining he would pay his share of bills. Asked about the snap (suncap) program and was told to apply later (since I was waiting for an opening in NY-no longer sure about the opening 1. he has no benefits and 2. personal reasons too).
    He was missing payments due to miscalculations regarding the sheltered income from a workshop at school once he turned 22 yrs.
    They made an incorrect update for $334 and sent me that.
    They continued to send me only $400-$457 for April, May and June.
    End of May, I was contacted by a lady from SSA via a handwritten letter (she crossed everything in the letter out) She wrote “You must call me once, leave a phone number so I can call you back. We need to update your claim and we do that every once in a while”.
    I did as she instructed but she never called me. My son is severely autistic and was just reviewed the year before.
    A few days later I get a letter stating that my son’s benefits were “stopped” not suspended.

    Within days I faxed over my reconsideration forms.
    One for the benefit amount and one for the stopped payments. She never responded to me.

    (In fact, the same lady who sent the letter had argued with me when I wanted to give her the CDR paperwork the previous year until I spoke to her supervisor who cleared everything up for me. She hated me since then and she has been making me pay for it since. I don’t like to cry for money but I have to cry over this treatment.)

    I emailed another lady in the office and the first lady who sent the letter sending attachments with my current lease, my reconsideration forms, bank statements, my written explanation. The lady who sent the letter sent me an email saying she would call me but she never did.
    Then we argued back and forth because she said she had a record of every call and that I never called. I told her I have record of my calls and faxes as well. I explained that I still have the CDR info. I sent her before (even though a lady in NY completed it for me instead so she didn’t have to do it after all but she was still upset because her supervisor told her to do it).
    She changed the status after I told her that and his benefits were no longer stopped but “suspended”. It said because we needed to update his address or direct deposit information.
    I contacted the first lady and explained everything to her.
    Then she said that she needed me to bring my son into the office for proof that he was there because they see a NY address for him in the system.
    Which should be impossible since he is with me, non-verbal, can’t read or write due to severe autism. I reminded her of the place in NY that I was waiting to open up and he is on the list. I sent her all the information from that organization and she contacted them.
    *Let me also add that when I picked him up from school she wanted proof. I gave it to her and she called the manager of the school and confirmed that I had picked him up.
    *I also sent her my outgoing airline ticket as proof.
    She confirmed all the information and had proof my son was with me but then she said she needs me to bring him in.
    ***I took him in the very next day.****
    (I also sent her our airline tickets for when we flew to Florida in March.
    I explained that my son is on a lot of meds and his school psychiatrist sent them to me for 3 months. They refused to send meds and it’s not the kind you can just stop. I begged the lady because a psychiatrist is so expensive w/o Medicaid and even working it’s a burden.)
    Once we were at the SSA office, the security guard went to the back to call her and after a few minutes he came back with a change of heart. No longer nice to me as he was before he went to the back.
    He told me the lady was called out because of her husband and to come back tomorrow.
    I explained I could not come back the next day due to work. I asked for the first lady who sent the letter. She told the guard that she didn’t want to speak to me because I was rude to her on the phone.
    **We never spoke on the phone, ever!**
    I asked for a supervisor and he told me he was going to kick me out and then he refused to speak to me. He would only speak to my husband. I am the payee rep and not my husband.
    Later that day, I emailed the lady because once I calmed down, I realized I should care about her husband first and foremost.
    I emailed her and asked if all was okay and she said yes. She said she even went back to work that day.
    She didn’t ask me anything else and that was the last contact I had with her.
    Bills are mounting and a lot of problems like dominoes.
    I went to another office in Fl to simply update his record to get him in pay status. The lady there ignored my Reconsideration forms and started asking me why I went to that office.
    She wanted even more things after seeing our IDs, she said he should be listed on the lease. Because what if he flies out somewhere else tomorrow.
    Then she says she will call the same lady, even though I asked her to at least call the other one who left for her husband.
    She said she has to speak to the same lady who sent the original letter. She called her and the original lady said “she was on her way out the door” at 3pm.
    I was told the record would be updated after the same lady who started all of this gives the greenlight.
    I really doubt it because it’s once again up to the same lady that started all of this and refused to even see me.
    They continuously ask me for things they didn’t ask me for before.
    I am stuck and I really need his pay status on right away.
    There is so much more I can tell you but that is it.
    I said I would get a lawyer, contact the news, write people, complain and this lady just won’t budge. She ignored my reconsideration forms.
    It’s as if I never filed. They still have the NY address on record as if I never went to the office in March or emailed my lease in June.
    All the payments missing are over $3000 now. I added in the 2.5 years that they failed the pay his state supplement in my reconsideration but other than that it’s the miscalculated payments because of overestimating his pay and not raising his pay after I told them he’d pay his share and took in my lease as I was previously instructed to do. Also no pay since June. Normally 2 months wouldn’t break me but with so many things going on I am at my wits end.
    I am so upset. I did everything they asked and still they won’t budge.
    Sorry I typed a lot but I just want you to have all the information and was not sure about what to leave out.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear CeCe,

      I rarely suggest this, but I think it may be time to contact the Florida Congressperson for the district you are living in with all the information you gave me, except give him or her the names of the offices and employees involved and ask him or her to inquire what can be done to start your son’s benefits again and assure that your appeals regarding the calculations are addressed.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  181. Lisa says:

    Hi I’m 22 and on SSI. I just had an engagement party and got checks (some of them have my name only on them, some my fiancé and others are written out to cash).

    We aren’t married so I don’t have to report what isn’t in my name, but is there anything I could/should do for the ones in my name so that I don’t lose that money from SSI?
    I’m trying to save to move out so I don’t want to have anything deducted.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lisa,

      In order not to commit fraud, you need to report the cash gifts that were specifically given to you in your name. The gifts will affect your eligibility for SSI in the month they were received if they were either more than $20 from one person or a more than $60 total from all givers. (If they are under those amounts in a single calendar quarter, the gifrts will be excluded as irregular and infrequent income.) After that the month of receipt the money you save will count toward your resource limit of $2,000. Don’t put your money together with your fiance’s until you are married or his money will count as yours.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  182. MARTHA says:

    I have 3 kids. 1 with my husband of 10 years and 2 younger from after we separated. The 2 kids bio dad is not in the picture at all. He does not pay any support. They each receive 540 per month. Bio dad is on their birth certificate and my soon to be ex has been written off paternity. We have the 1 child together. I am on social security disability. Therefore I receive side amount and each of the 3 kids also receive an amount of 200. When I am divorced my ex will be required to pay it appears the worksheets for child support for the 1 joint child as 494. What does this affect and who does it affect and to what amount. He has given 2 checks so far for that child’s clothes and I know I need to report to but since child support is for the one not On ssi and it is not income what happens to my other kids ssi I and to my side and their side payments. I am confused and prefer to know a bit before I panic as we are just making it and everyone says I should be happy we will get child support for 1 kid but I not happy i am so Stressed out.
    Signed : rather live on no child support

    • MARTHA says:

      Clarifying the 2 not of the marriage kids are getting ssi of 540 and 200 from my ssdi each. The kids are both disabled. My 1 joint child who would receive child support is not Disabled and gets 200 my ssdi.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Martha,

      I am assuming that by “side amount” you mean Supplemental Security Income (SSI). My responses are based on that assumption.

      It is important that you report the checks for the child’s clothes right away and the support as soon as it starts. Your SSI and your child’s SSI may not be affected by the changes, but Social Security has to receive the report to make a determination. The sooner you report, the sooner you will know what your situation is.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Martha says:

        Kay

        I meant social security disability amount.
        Breaks down to this:
        Child a joint child to begin receivimg child support from her dad. She lives with me full time. She receives soc sec disability as my child because I am on social security disability note this is not ssi.
        I receive soc sec disability.
        I have two children from a different father who is not in the picture and do not receive support for. They are both disabled. They receive ssi for their disability each of 540 and the 200 from my son sec disability as my minor child each.

        My quest is to know if their children b n c’s ssi or my ssdi will be affected by my child A receiving child support. I will report though I am probably 2 months late on that now from the first surprise check for her to receive. Thank you for the replies part of the disability is severe ptsd

        • Martha says:

          200 each From my ssdi not my son. Ugh I hate spell check

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Martha,

          Your Social Security Disability benefits and children’s Social Security dependent benefits will not be affected by a child receiving child support payments. Depending on the amount of Social Security you are receiving, child support for the SSI-ineligible child could cause a reduction in the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) of the other two children. Again, you need to report this right away. If your children have an SSI overpayment, you can request that the overpayment collection be spread over several months.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  183. Brit says:

    Hi Kay,

    If a 22 year old who is living with his mother recently started receiving SSI benefits, will the amount the mother charges him for rent be considered income for the mother and thus, be subject to income taxes?

    Brit

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Brit,

      I am not qualified to answer tax questions. I suggest that the mother talk with the IRS or a tax accountant. Part of what she could ask is which expenses she can claim to calculate the profit from the rental income.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  184. laura says:

    Hi, my daughter is 18 with a disability. She was getting $721.00 a month and I revived letter stating that they were dropping it to $486.00. We get food stamps, and I was wondering since she gets food from an outside source, could that be the reason They reduced it by 1/3. Confused

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Laura,

      Receipt of food stamps does not affect the amount of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payable. Assuming the reduction is correct, the reduction is due to her not paying her share of shelter costs as a member of the household or not paying market rate for her room. If you think an error has been made, your daughter can appeal the decision and present the facts regarding what she is paying.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  185. Missy says:

    Hi. I am researching information on moving my 60 year old mother from MS to AL. She is currently a recipient of Medicaid and Disability and Food Stamps. I am not sure if she receives SSI? We are looking at moving her into her own residence on our property. I have no idea how benefits would change or how to begin this process. Any direction on how to start this process would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Missy,

      Your mother may have letters that say what type of benefits she is getting or her bank statement should show it. If not, she can call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 and ask. If she is receiving only Social Security, she just needs to report a change of address to Social Security and new bank information if she is changing banks. If she changes banks, she shouldn’t close the existing bank account until the first payment is deposited to the new account.

      If she is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), given she is receiving Medicaid she may be getting SSI, the amount of her SSI benefit will have to be redetermined. You should take her to the local Social Security office in Alabama to report the move. Be prepared to provide information about how much rent she will be paying for the residence on your property. If she does not pay market value for the rent and utilities, her SSI will be reduced.

      She also needs to report her move to her current food stamp office and Medicaid office and reapply for food stamps and Medicaid in Alabama. The Mississippi office may be able to provide the contact information for the office in Alabama.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  186. samantha says:

    Hello. I get ssi for 2 of my 3 children each get 721 a month. I got a letter asking me to provide pay stubs, bank statement and unemployment records. So I have a couple of questions. 1. I lost my job and now receive unemployment but I didn’t tell social security. I didn’t think I had to as long as I called every month to report my income. Will the kids ssi get cut off because of that? 2. If my Aunt just bought me my first car and it’s in my name do I need to report that to ss? 3. I don’t divide the bills in the house either. Everything goes into a big pot and gets paid at the same time. I use the card ss mailed me to pay rent or cable or even credit card bills but it says food and shelter. Can I get in trouble for that? I use credit cards to buy food and I use my money to pay rent. Should I start to break everything down by who pays what? It just seems like extra work and added at fees to do that.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Samantha,

      You are responsible for reporting all changes in your income and assets whether or not you think the change will affect your children’s check. Earned income (wages) is treated differently from unemployment (unearned income). You do need to report receiving the gift of the car. Depending on the value of the car, your children may not be eligible in the month you receive the car because its value is income to you. After that the car will not affect their eligibility.

      If only you and your children live in your household you do not have to do an even division of everything and you are providing food and shelter for your children, so you probably not misusing their benefits. The problem lies in the possible appearance that you are. I suggest that you use their card only to pay for their food, shelter, clothing, medical care, school supplies and other needs and that you pay for the cable and credit card bills with your own money. I suggest keeping a simple log of what the money is used for. Another option would be to open a bank account for each of them and have the money go to the bank account. (The account title would be “Child’s name by your name, representative payee.”) That would eliminate the card use fees and you would have cancelled checks to show the use. Checks could be written to you with annotation “rent” or other use or could be sent directly to the provider of the service or goods.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  187. Cici says:

    My grandmother was admitted to a nursing facility three months ago and we just decided that this may be a permanent living arrangement. Will the facility report this change to Social Security or do I need to do this on her behalf? I have been using the SSI payments to pay all her rent and utilities but now that she is going to be permanent resident at the facility will I get in trouble for using her payments?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Cici,

      During the time that you thought your grandmother would return to her home, it was okay to use her Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to keep the home you thought she would return to. However, there is a catch: If more than half of the nursing home bill is being paid by Medicaid, she may have been eligible for only $35 a month SSI beginning with the first full month she was in the nursing home. Report to Social Security right away that you just learned she will not be coming home. They will tell you what documentation you need to provide and will determine whether your grandmother is overpaid.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  188. Marcus says:

    Dear Kaye, I’m 64 on SS of $717 and SSI of $24, next year @ 65 years, I’ll get a vested pension of $230, all known to SSA. A homeowner, with few (apx $1000) in assets, largely a car valued @ $800, now less with a shot transmission, and a motorcycle I’ve had since I was 22, as my primary transportation,(exempt)Medicaid pays my Rx costs monthly of $450-550. Last year I won one hundred bucks, reported it in 4 days, there was no change in SSI, some papers came but no change, it went on my 1040 tax form too..Questions, I want to sell about $200-300 of some old parts (not needed)from my motorcycle is that OK ? Also at 65 yrs with my pension, what will happen to my MEDICAID?, and will I still have to report, tho’ I’ll not get SSI $ , or what? TY for all your service.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marcus,

      You can sell the motorcycle parts. You are converting a resource to a different form so it is not income. Just watch that you do not go over the $2,000 on the first of any month. Your SSI should have been reduced by $100 two months after your won the money. Unless you are in a state that pays a substantial state SSI supplement, when you get your pension, your SSI will terminate, as will automatic Medicaid eligibility based on getting SSI. However, your income may still be low enough to qualify for Medicaid. I suggest that you try to get advance information on this. If you will not be eligible for Medicaid, you may want to enroll in and pay the premium for Part D Medicare when you turn age sixty-five. Medicare Part D provides some prescription coverage.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  189. Amber says:

    3 of my kids receive SSI. I have to report wages monthly. I have been and went to do so today and the automated system said I couldn’t. I’m confused. I’ve never had a problem. Is something wrong?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Amber,

      Perhaps there is a temporary problem with the automated system. I suggest that you try it on another day. If you continue to have a problem, call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 to report your earnings and the problem with the automated system.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  190. misty says:

    Hi Kay…. My question is my son is on SSI for his his disability. He receives $721.00 a month. I went back to work almost a year now and I have tried to get a hold of someone at the SS office and it was busy and or I kept getting hung up on. Will I get in trouble?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Misty,

      You are responsible for being sure that you report changes in your income. It is possible that your son is overpaid and you will have to repay the overpayment. I suggest that you write a letter to your local Social Security office in which you provide the date you returned to work and a a copy of all your pay stubs since then. In the letter say how many times your tried to call the office to report this and the approximate dates of when you made the attempts.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  191. Christopher Williams says:

    i also wanted to add that my spouse is also paying out 300 a month child support. So that leaves her already with a whopping 421 dollars a month.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Christopher,

      Your wife may not be responsible for the amount of child support she is paying given her low income. She can find out by asking the court to review the support order to see if it is appropriate under the current circumstances.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  192. Christopher Williams says:

    I have a question about my disability. I am on ssdi, and I receive 940 something a month, and each of my two boys receives 239? I am supposed to receive 370 a month from court ordered child support, when my ex pays it. Anyhow..these are ballpark figures. I recently got married and my spouse is on ssi disability. She receives 721 a month. My question is this:
    Will my ssdi income affect her ssi disability amt? We live on a very limited budget already, and we have not been to our appointment yet with ssi.
    Any advice or info will help.
    Thanks
    CHRIS

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Christopher,

      Your spouse should hold onto her SSI payments that she has received since you got married and not spend all the money because based on the information that you are providing, her benefit will be reduced to about $400. To see how this is calculated, read “What are deemed income and resources and how do they affect SSI payment amounts and qualifying for SSI Disability?” under the SSI tab on this website, http://www.disabilityadvisor.com.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  193. Gina says:

    Hello Kay,

    If a person who is a family friend moves into my household and I provide food, shelter and clothing for them will that increase the amount of SSI my children receive? Both of my children get SSI and since I work the amount they receive is based on what I make.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Gina,

      Your supporting a friend will have no impact on your children’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  194. Ton says:

    We have been receiving SSI. My husband got terminated and had to transfer 401k funds into bank IRA. According to our SSI contact person after apt our SSI and Medicaid will stop because this is considered a resource. I don’t understand because we can’t touch
    the account until retirement without hefty consequences and even then only a portion can be withdrawn periodically. What options do we have if assistance stops financially and medically because we still need this assistance?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ton,

      It is correct that the IRA is a countable resource because the money can be accessed. Even though your husband would have to pay a tax penalty for taking the money out early, he can access it for your support; and, therefore, it is a countable resource. The resource limit for a couple is $3,000. If your and your husban’s countable assets drop below $3,000 within a year of your becoming ineligible, you will not have to file a new claim to get benefits started again.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  195. Marian says:

    Hi
    I have a friend that will be living with me. She is currently on SSI for a disability. Can she get any further assistance to help with household expenses? Also what is the limit she can have in the bank for a savings? Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marian,

      Your friend could apply for SNAP (foodstamps). Supplemental Security Income (SSI) allows $2,000 in countable resources. How much your friend can have in the bank depends on her other countable resources. Some resources don’t count such as a car of normal value (not a luxury car).

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  196. kendr a dunlap says:

    I get ssi for my 3 year old son and i kust got a text saing his monthly amount of $721 is oending and will be abvailbe August 1st but we are supposed to be getting his last installment payment this month and that hasbt pasted will it pist seperatly or some ething we already paid oyr application fees and have been accepted to a duplex we have to move out of the apartment we are at now the live on site manager/ownder is a sever drug and alcohol addict they go in our apartments and do tons of stuff that is illegal to do bit i ned to know about my sons payment abd ssi is closedfor theday and im freaking out i know we are recieving the payment this month but i just thought it would post with his monthly amount. Please help me with some answers. Thank you. Hope to hear from youasap.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kendra,

      The back pay installment will be paid separately. I suggest that you contact the local Social Security immediately (go there if possible) and explain that you and your son are in a dangerous situation and you have arranged to move elsewhere and were counting on the back pay to pay the deposits, etc. Ask if they can take the action to authorize release of the installment today.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  197. Mary says:

    My sister-in-law receives SSI and lives in a Section 8 senior apartment. My mother-in-law would like to send her a gift of $100 per month for her to use as she wants. Will this effect her SSI? Is there a special way that we need to do this?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mary,
      sister-in-law’s SSI will go down by either $80 or $100, depending on whether or not she has other countable income. If your mother-in-law wants to help her daughter, she can buy things for her daughter as long as she doesn’t pay for rent, house utilities, or food. For example, she could pay the phone bill or a dental bill directly to the phone company or the doctor’s office or buy her movie tickets.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  198. Linda says:

    My son recieves ssi and i have failed to report me getting married on time because thats when my mom and dad got sick and we was taking care of them and ended up putting my dad in hospice at a veterns hospital and its been almost two years. I always report stuff on time but just got caught up in taking care of them. I just dont wamt to get into amy trouble.and i have a review set in august.Any advice would be appericiated.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Linda,

      Report your marriage during the review and explain why you didn’t report it. Take your marriage certificate all your spouse’s (and your) financial records–W-2 forms, bank accounts, etc. to the appointment. There is a good possibility that your son is overpaid. If so, when you get the overpayment notice, if you cannot pay it all back at once, request a repayment plan within ten days of the overpayment letter. You may be able to lessen the amount you “are in trouble” by cooperating fully now

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  199. CEB says:

    In January 2014, my grandmother went overseas to visit her children. She called/reported this to SSI before she left to stop her SSI payments. Just recently she told my parents that she thinks she likes it there and may not come back. In the meantime, we received a letter stating that there’s an overpayment of almost $12K because they believe my grandmother has been out of the country since 2012! She hasn’t traveled outside the US except for her husband’s funeral in 2007. What can we do about this? I’ve been to the local SS office and given them copies of her doctor appts and Rx receipts but they say I’m not an official representative. -Thanks in advance.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear CEB,

      Your grandmother can write up a document making you her official representative to conduct SSI business with the Social Security Administration. She should have the document notarized. She can also go to the U.S. embassy in her country and ask them to copy the pages of her passport and certify the copies as genuine.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  200. tym says:

    My daughter receives ado benefits. She is 6. My question we have failed to report a change in employment status. Is there a big penalty for doing so? I also am wondering what is the difference between ‘resources’ and earned “income” ? Final question is what is the payment scale versus earning scale? How does they counter eachother? And/or how they affect the other? Thank you
    Tym

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tym,

      The following information applies to the Supplemental Security Income program. I do not know what “ado benefits” are. Resources are what you own; income is money and free shelter or free food received within a month. Earned income is income received from working; unearned income is all other income such as Social Security, investment income, and gifts. You can read about how SSI payments are calculated in the articles under the “SSI” tab on the website http://www.disabilityadvisor.com.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  201. Jessica says:

    Hello, i have a question in regards to termination of payments for disability. If benefits were terminated due to address change, what must i do to get benefits back, and how long does it take

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jessica,

      Contact the Social Security Administration with your new address. If you were receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI), benefits should be reinstated within a week or two. If you receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you need to have an interview with Social Security so they can determine your payment amount in your new location. This could take longer.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  202. Janice Mateo says:

    My husband and I have been separated since October of 2013. His daughter is filing a Social Security Disability Insurance form for him. She is requesting my Social Security Number, Birth Certificate and our marriage certificate for filing purposes. I am very uneasy about this. Can you direct me. I definitely will not give my Social Security Number or Birth Certificate.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Janice,

      If your husband is approved for benefits, you might be eligible for dependent benefits on his earnings records now or in the future or survivor benefits if he were to die. His application asks for the spouse’s name, social security number (SSN), and date of birth. The birth certificate can be submitted in the future if he is approved and you are potentially eligible for benefits. I suggest that you ask your husband’s daughter to list your name and date of birth on the application and, if in the future, Social Security needs your SSN or birth certificate, you will submit it to them.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  203. PATRICIA says:

    hello I have question I’m a the payee for my daughter that is 17 yrs old I get SSI for her currently, but she recently runaway, can she apply for snap since she is staying with a friend?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Patricia,

      I suggest that you check with the SNAP office about your daughter’s SNAP eligibility. You need to contact Social Security about your daughter’s new living arrangements right away and either resign as her payee or get advice on how to handle being her payee when she is not in your household. (You cannot use any of her money for your household expenses while she is she is not living in your household.)

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  204. melonie says:

    Question my husband wants to know as he is just getting ready to start gettin soical security disability and his question is if he was to take part of his back payment and start a savings account that he does not want to touch for so many years and intrest builds up on it will that affect his disability amount each month and how much can he save before it affects his amount each month I hope that makes since he just wants a nest egg for us both just in case something happens

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Melonie,

      If your husband will be getting Social Security Disability (SSDI) and not Supplemental Security Income (SSI), he can save any amount he wants. What a person owns does not affect Social Security benefits.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  205. Randy maxwell says:

    My fiancee is Filipino and I am on SSI which is not considered a guaranteed income so I cannot get a visa for her to enter the United States so we can get married without a cosponsor and I have none. So I have decided to move there I have a friend that can help me there get a internet business going two make a livin my question is the Social Security owe’s me ten thousand in back pay on my SSI benefits if I’m leaving the country will I still get it? and it is due to be paid in January as they now split the back pay in 3rd’s .can I get it early seeing as how I am leaving my country?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Randy,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is not payable to individuals who are out of the U.S. for more than thirty days and SSI checks are not deliverable to foreign countries. It is possible that if you leave the U.S. before your back pay is paid out it will not be payable. One of the few exceptions to installment payment of back SSI, is if a person will not longer be eligible. Perhaps if you can present proof of your intent to leave the country permanently, thus becoming ineligible, they will be able to pay the full amount of back benefits.I suggest that you make an appointment with a claims representative to discuss your situation.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  206. Jessica says:

    Hello,

    I am my minor sons payee for SSI, i have the DirectExpress Card and get the full 721 on it every month. If my son goes and lives with his father for a year and then comes back home here. Will i still be able to be his payee while he is living with his father?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jessica,

      You must report your son’s move and the parent with custody will be made the payee. Also, if your son lives with his father, his father’s income and assets will be considered in determining whether he continues to be eligible for SSI while living with him. If he is ineligible and the child returns to you before being ineligible for twelve months, you will not have to file a new claim to get benefits started again.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  207. Justin says:

    I have 2 questions,and My Brother(43) and I(39) are both on SSDI,SSI AND WI-SSI. 1. Well my brother just passed away(on Monday 7/21),and I was told my payments may change not sure if it goes down or up. So will they payments change??? And 2. My Brother has a Death Insurance(I think that’s what it called) for his funeral exspenses. In his will he has me and my sister as the beneficiaries for what ever moneys left over. But also,now my sister(44 w/passed) died before my brother,and he didn’t change it yet,before he passed. Any info is appreciated……….

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Justin,

      It sounds as if you and your brother were receiving disabled adult child Social Security benefits on a parent’s earnings record. If that is true then your Social Security could go up because your brother’s benefits have stopped.

      Your inheritance will count as income for your federal and state Supplemental Security Income (SSI) in the month it is received. If on the first of the following month you have countable assets over $2,000, you will not be eligible again until your assets drop below the $2,000 limit. As far as the insurance beneficiaries go, you can check the provisions of the policy or with the insurance company to see if your sister’s share goes to you or to her heirs.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • justin says:

        Hi again Kay, Well I am getting all disabled adult child Social Security benefits on my Dads earning record. With that I am not longer getting federal and state Supplemental Security Income(SSI). So my questions now are A. will I beable to keep Medicaid and Medicare(primary)??? and B, I am about to get a inheritance from my brother of about 10k, what do I need to do to keep(or spend it) the money, yet will beable I keep getting my disabled adult child Social Security benefits on my dads earnings record???

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Justin,

          You will keep your Medicaid entitlement. You may have to reapply for Medicaid to see if your income is low enough to qualify for the Medicaid program. Your inheritance will not affect your Disabled Adult Child benefits and does not have to be reported to Social Security. If you remain eligible for Medicaid, you must report the income to the Medicaid office.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  208. Lauren Savina says:

    I have received SSI benefits since 18 y/o due to a mental illness that prevented me from working. If I get a job in another state am I authorized to move? If so, what steps do I need to take to update my information if I move before I have the available information about the job? (i.e.- income, hours, info they only give upon signing a contract, sometimes)

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lauren,

      You are free to move from state to state. As soon as you move, contact the Social Security Administration to provide information about your new living arrangement and as much information as you have at the time about your new job. Then as soon as you have information about your pay rate and hours, report that promptly. Be aware that, depending on how much you are earning, you may have to repay part or all of the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for months in which you receive work earnings.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  209. Mica says:

    Hello! I have a question. I got married a couple days ago and am trying to report the current change to my local ssi office but they’ve been overloaded. My question is..will my ssi amount change if my husband is unemployed, a student, and a disabled veteran? I am not getting the full amount of ssi. Thanks so much!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mica,

      If your husband has income, his income may affect the amount your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  210. crystal branton-espada says:

    Hi im having trouble understanding how social security counts my husbands income and we have been separated almost 2 years now hes military and he is not the biligolical of my children who are receiving ssi can he lives in hawaii can u tell me what I need to do

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Crystal,

      If your husband is not living in the same household with the children, his income should not count to reduce your children’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI). You need to submit a statement from your husband giving the date that he moved out. You also need to gather as much proof as you can of when he moved out, such as rent receipts or mortgage records for all the addresses he has lived at since he moved out. Once you have proved the date he moved out, your children’s SSI can be recalculated to determine whether they were eligible for more than they received since their stepfather moved out.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  211. Fred says:

    I am disabled and receive SSI money. I have moved and a friend has moved in with me. I am not married. My friend is not working and receives no income at all. I am paying all living expenses. Do I need to report her moving in with me?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Fred,

      You do need to report your friend’s moving in with you even though she is not paying any of the expenses. If she starts to contribute to rent, utilities or food at a later time, you should report that also.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  212. Kelly says:

    We have a child who was getting ssi benefits. Recently found out we were way over resources so they stopped her benefits. I just recently got paper work saying she was over paid by $18,900! Is it worth asking a waiver for if we were definitely over resources? What else can they do if we can’t pay it back? Thanks for your time
    Kelly

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kelly,

      To be eligible for a waiver, you have to be without fault in causing the overpayment and also be unable to pay it. That said, it can’t hurt for apply for the waiver. One alternative would be to pay back enough to put you below the resource limit again and then ask for a waiver for the remainder and suspension of collection until the waiver decision is made. At the same time, ask for collection of the remainder as partial withholding of SSI benefits if the waiver is denied. Keep a copy of all the requests submitted. And, to get suspension of collection, you need to make the request within ten days of receiving the overpayment notice.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Kelly says:

        If they deny the waiver and we don’t pay it back what will they do? The money that caused us to be over resource is not even ours, we were holding it for our son! Who does not live here and is over 25…just curious. They have suspended benefits now for over 6 months, waiting for a decision on a waiver actually. They must be backed up or something?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Kelly,

          Social Security overpayments never go off the books unless collection is waived. A Social Security overpayment can be collected from retirement benefits years later. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is not paid from the Social Security trust fund, so collection laws are different. I do not know whether tax refunds could be withheld or other collection actions taken. I suggest that if the waiver is denied, you discuss this with the Social Security Administration.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  213. Susan says:

    Hi! My question is this, when does social security no longer count the parents income for a child with a disability? Right now we are not eligible because we make too much money. My child is definitely eligible..has been in the past and received benefits but we are now over income. When do they stop counting our income?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Susan,

      Your income will no longer be considered in determining your child’s eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) when he or she turns eighteen. About four months before his or her eighteenth birthday, you can file an application for a medical decision based on the disability criteria for an adult. That will allow some time for processing. Benefits will begin the month after the child’s eighteenth birthday unless the birthday is the first of the month, in which case benefits will start with the birthday month.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  214. lisa says:

    Hi,
    My son is 22 and I am just applying for SSI because of major mental health issues for him. I met with the county today to discuss and they got me working on things. My question is this: If my son does receive benefit, we will be collecting rent from him each month. Does that rental money collected from my son require me to include it as income on my tax return? (i.e, is that considered income to me and therefore I must file taxes on it? or is it considered “difficulty of care payments” and is exempt from my needing to claim as income?
    Thank you in advance.
    Lisa

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lisa,

      Your question is a tax question. I suggest that you contact the IRS or a tax accountant for guidance.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  215. Stanley says:

    I receive disability and I take care of my daughter. She doesn’t have a disability. Can I receive more money to take care of my daughter and I? If so what do I need to do?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Stanley,

      You do not say whether you are receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security disability (SSDI). SSI does not pay dependents benefits. SSDI benefits can be accompanied by dependent benefits depending on the disabled person’s family maximum benefit. If you are receiving SSDI, an application should have been taken for your daughter at the time you were approved. If you get SSDI, I suggest that you contact Social Security to find out whether your family maximum is more than you are getting for yourself. If it is, you can file an application for your daughter.

      If your daughter is eligible for Social Security dependent benefits, contact your state’s health and human services department to see whether you might be eligible for some assistance to help support her.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  216. radost says:

    i’m 66 years old. married. we have no income. i recive 744 per month SSI because of my age. we have no other pension, SSD etc.
    I have recently recived a check from my last employer (my employment was termonated over a year ago). the check is for 4886 from a profit sharing plan. accrding to the employer the deducted 20% tax and the 4886 is after tax. how will this affect my ssi payment? do i need to report it to SSI and then file taxes? thank you very much!!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Radost,

      You must report the profit sharing check to Social Security. You will not be eligible for SSI in the month you received it. You will have to repay the money you got for that month. You will also be ineligible for any month thereafter that your assets are $2,000 or more. You may use the money to repay the overpayment for things that you need. Once you have spent down to below $2,000, your SSI can start again.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • radost says:

        Thank you very much Kay! I really appreciate it. I owe my son $3700 that i borrowed after i lost my job but before i turned 65 and stated receiving SSI by age. I promised my son to return the loan when i receive this check from the profit sharing plan. Can I use that money to repay the loan and if so will it affect my SSI payments and how would i report it to SSI?
        if i can repay him with that money, should i deposit in my account and write him a check or can i just give him the check and he will give me cash for the difference?
        Thank you so very much for your kind assistance!!!

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Radost,

          Valid use of some of the profit-sharing funds should include repaying a debt. You and your son will have to submit statements to the Social Security Administration about the amount of money he lent you and that the money you received was definitely a loan and that at the time of the loan there was an agreement of how you were going to repay (from the profit sharing when it was paid out.) I recommend depositing the check and writing a check to your son because it creates a clear record of the transactions. Also, some banks don’t accept third-party checks.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

      • radost says:

        Thank you very Kay! I really appreciate the advice. To follow-up, I was planning to return a loan for money I owe to my son. He gave me $3700 after I lost my job and was waiting to turn 65 and for SSI to start. I knew I will receive the money from the profit sharing plan and wanted to use it to repay the loan.
        1) Can I use it to repay the loan?
        2) If yes, should I deposit the check on my account and write my son a check for 3700?
        3) Maybe I can just give him the original check for 4886 and he gives me the change cash?
        4) How do I report that to SSI? Thank you so much!! You are the best!

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Radost,

          Please see my response of a few minutes ago, which answers questions one through three. To answer question four, make a photocopy of the check before you cash it. Take the following to your local Social Security office: the check copy and any correspondence you have about the profit sharing payment and the statements by you and your son that I reference in my previous response. Say that you need to report a change in income and disposition of resources and would like to see a claims representative to make the report.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  217. Linda Bucheit says:

    I have a 30 year old daughter on SSI i am her payee I have always been her payee I will be moving to texas with her and renting a room and paying rent and sharing the utility bills and paying for our own food will this effect her SSI and there is one checking account I have a very small pension that goes into checking

  218. Linda Bucheit says:

    I take care of my 30 year old daughter wjho gets SSI I am her payee we will be moving to Texas soon and renting a room paying part of all the expenses and all her own food there is 1 other person in the house will it effect her SSI by sharing with this person

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Linda,

      As long as she is paying at least half of the shelter expenses, her SSI will not be affected. You do need to report the change in her living arrangements to the Social Security Administration.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  219. Ritta V says:

    Hello kay,
    Im 22 and get ssi $721 n have a 3 year old. single. but i plan to get married soon will that affect me in anyway?
    Another question:
    The men im gonna be marrying is currently paying child suporrt for his other 3 kids he has will that affect me reciveing my mnth payment since im not working but will start classes in August.
    Help please!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ritta,

      When you get married, your husband’s income will be considered in determining your eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). In deciding how much if any of his income will affect your earnings, Social Security will first allot month for your husband’s support and the support of your child and the children for whom he is paying child support. Depending on how much he is earning, his earnings may not affect your benefit. You can take the actual figures (gross earnings and child support payments) to Social Security and ask them to give you an estimate.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  220. Adrian says:

    My sister has been receiving SSI benefits for she and my niece since her husband dies about 10 years ago. She moved back in with my parents and has been living there for 10 years. My mother passed away recently and I discovered that she was supposed to be helping them out with $500/month for rent and utilities but rarely paid it. I suspect she still claimed that on the monthly report. She never paid for rent, utilities, food, or any other essentials. She has bought a TON of video games and DVDs though!

    Now she has moved to Florida but can’t afford a two bedroom. When I told her to get a 1-bedroom apt, she said that SSI requires her to have a separate bedroom for her daughter.

    a. Has she committed fraud for claiming $500 for rent and utilities when she in fact rarely paid that.
    b. Must she rent a two bedroom?

    Thanks!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Adrian,

      If your sister and niece have been getting Supplemental Security Income (SSI) because both are disabled, then it would be fraudulent to report paying rent when not doing so. On the other hand, if she and your niece have been receiving survivor benefits on your brother-in-law’s Social Security earnings record, their benefits are not related to whether or not they pay rent.

      Neither Social Security or Supplemental Security Income law requires a two bedroom apartment. Perhaps she is getting assistance from another source that has that requirement.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  221. sybil says:

    Hi,

    I am a rep payee for my child which is 11months old. We dont have a car here in chicago, we always take the cab and its very expensive. I was planning to use her money to get a car cause she has a lot of doctors appoinment every month. My question is can I be able to make a downpayment using her money and pay for the installment everymonth?..

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sybil,

      Given that the car is primarily to provide transportation for your child’s medical care, the use of her benefits for the car seems reasonable. You could put the car in both your and the child’s names to make it clear that you are not misusing her funds.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • sybil says:

        Thank you for clearing my mind about using the part of her money for a car. It’s very helpful. If you mind can i ask you another question?..my child receive her first check this month which is $1754.thats for 4months coz she was enrolled last april and my husband told me that since we pay for her previous needs such as hospital transportion and therapies for month of april, may and june that we can use the money that is suppose to be for her during that previous months. And we are not liable to reason or justify the expenses that are already made last april may and june. I am afraid to get it coz i know i will be the one to justify the expenses made. My question is…is my husband have a point or can we use the money that is suppose to be use by my child during the last 3months or I still have to use it for her benefits and document it?..or can I reimburse the money we used for her past transpo and needs the previous 3months but i dont have the receipt anymore..(hope your not confuse). Thank you so much kay!

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Sybil,

          It seems reasonable to get a printout from the medical providers who provided services during those three months and reimburse yourselves for those expenses. The rest could be saved for future medical expenses which could come up for your daughter, which might exceed what could be covered with her monthly checks.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  222. Karen says:

    I went over resources by being on my grown childrens and separated husbands bank acts. I am representative payee for my child. I filed a waiver and it has been 6 months and still no decision. I called they say sometimes it takes forever but that they are monitoring me? What does that even mean? Not sure what to do. They already stopped her benefits so we are not continuing to get them.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Karen,

      If your child is not receiving benefits because family resources are still too high, then maybe your don’t need to worry about how long your request for waiver of repayment is taking because they are not collecting the overpayment right now. If, on the other hand, the child is eligible but benefits are being withheld to collect the overpayment, you can request only partial withholding while the request for waiver is pending.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Karen says:

        I took my names off the accounts. I am just curious why it is taking so long? They asked me to send in copies of her IEP, my tax forms, and my property tax bills for the last 2 years. When I called the toll free number one representative said they were monitoring something etc.? I called back because I got disconnected and the next representative had no idea what she was talking about. I mean how long does it take for them to decide a waiver? I tried to request a partial withholding and they told me I had to of done that within 10 days and I did not. I just don’t like the fact of this over my head I would like it resolved and don’t know what is taking so long and I get no answers. Why would they want all that information anyways again? Thanks for your reply:)

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Karen,

          I am not sure you are getting correct information. To stop withholding during an appeal of the fact of an overpayment, you must request continuation of benefits within ten days. I am not sure that that time frame when you agree with the overpayment but have requested a waiver. Also, if you submitted everything once before, you shouldn’t have to submit the same things again unless they have been lost. I suggest that you go to your local office and ask to speak to an SSI claims representative (not a service representative) to make a written request for partial withholding and to request that the local office send a follow-up inquiry to the office that decides whether the waiver will be granted. To be eligible for waiver you must both be unable to repay (financial hardship) and not be at fault in causing the overpayment (reported everything on time).

          Sincerely,

          Kay

          • Karen says:

            The local office is over an hour away so that isn’t going to happen. They told me I could not make a request now because it should have been done within 10 days of the notice and it wasn’t. I am sure they will not grant it as I was on many acts with my grown children and did not realize that it would be considered my resource. Any idea though why it takes so long for a waiver answer? And again what did the rep mean by monitoring me? I have submitted things both by fax and mail. Its very frustrating!

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Karen,

            The representative may have meant that the local office is checking on your request for waiver from time to time. I would say that a decision has not yet been made because they have not yet gotten around to looking at the request. There are backlogs in pretty much every Social Security department.

            Sincerely,

            Kay

          • Karen says:

            Is it typical they would ask for my childs school records and property tax forms etc? For a waiver? It almost sounds like their trying to make a decision on the waiver and re-qualify her?

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Karen,

            You are right that the requests do seem to be addressing both medical eligibility and financial issues.

            Sincerely,

            Kay

          • Karen says:

            So what would you suggest…just wait it out? I live too far away to go in and who actually makes the decision on an overpayment of $20,000? Is it the local office? I send letters periodically and get nothing back and I call the 1-800 number and they say they send them correspondence to let me know the status but that hasn’t happened either. Just want it resolved thats all! What do you suggest or make of any of it? Thanks so much..

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Karen,

            The local office does not make waiver decisions. They are made in the central payment center. All the local office can do is send inquiry letters to the payment center. They really can’t speed anything up.

            Sincerely,

            Kay

  223. sonya says:

    I have two.children who receives ssi.. I had an overpayment…for the amount
    Of $500.. Why does ssa make me pay back $500 out of both.checks for a toal of $1000 rather.than $250 out of each check for the total.overpayment of $500.. So basically they are getting paid back $500.more than they should..is that legal???

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sonya,

      Your children were probably overpaid the same amount each. You should have gotten two separate overpayment letters that state the amount each child was overpaid. If you have the letters, check them to see if the letters both say $500. If they do, then each child was overpaid $500. If the letters each ay $250, then take a copy of the letters to the Social Security Administration to get the collection corrected.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  224. Lilliana says:

    My son receives 480$ of ssi disability they send a letter letting me know that he was gonna start receiving 721$ a month. the problem is that my son wasnt receiving child support ut the prolem that we had with child support is fixed and they are sending me the checks that they owe. I reported it but now i don’t know what’s gonna happend, are they gonna stop sending my son ssi or what?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lilliana,

      Your son’s child support will reduce his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment. If the child support is over $741 monthly, SSI will stop completely. If it varies from month to month, you must report the changes.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  225. Gabe says:

    Hello, I receiving $750 for SSI, I have a 4 year old and my Fiancé is expecting my 2nd child. She works at Burger King as a manager makes $850-to-$1000 depending on month. We would like to get married sometime this year. We have talked about the risk of Me losing my SSI. Would her income be deemed as my income if we have 2 kids? Would it not go towards the children? Will they take my SSI away if we get married?? Thank you for your time,
    Gabe

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Gabe,

      If you get married, some of your wife’s income will be allocated for the support of the two children and for her own support before any is deemed as countable income for you. At the rate she is currently earning, her earnings would have little or no affect on your Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Gabe says:

        Thank you Kay for the quick response, I’m also wondering if she starts recieving $1400 a month (due to her becoming a manager) will the raise be affecting my SSI income?.. What is the max we can both make before it affects my SSI with our 2 children living with Us if we get married?.. We both are just seeing our options. Thank you for your time.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Gabe,

          You can calculate your benefit considering your future wife’s potential salary of $1,400 by following the calculation example for income deemed from a spouse posted on this website, Disability Advisor. Go to http://www.disabilityadvisor.com/qualifying-for-ssi-disability/ to find the article and sample calculation. Alternatively, you can ask Social Security to calculate an amount for you.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  226. Shannon says:

    Part 2 of my above post…I guess what I am confused about is can ssi money be used to pay for things that can be paid for by the special needs trust? Does SSI expect me to pay for those items such as gas, entertainment etc out the special needs trust even if I have ssi money left over after his basic needs are met?

  227. Shannon says:

    I am my sons representative payee and trustee and conservator.
    He draws ssi based on his disability and he also has a special needs trust. I am confused as to what I am allowed to spend the ssi money on? Does it have to be only food and shelter since he has a special needs trust? Am I not allowed to pay copays, haircuts and things of that nature with the ssi money since he has a special needs trust?

    Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Shannon,

      Please clarify “special needs trust.” Are you referring to a trust set up for your son that is unrelated to Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or are you referring to a Dedicated Account that SSI law requires for SSI back pay paid to a minor?

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Shannon says:

        It is not a dedicated account. He is 21. It was set up when he turned 18 because he started receiving annuity payments that had been put in a trust for him since he was five. When he got injured at age five the man that hit him, his insurance company paid us a settlement and we put it in a trust fund til he turned 18. Then he was to start drawing so much a month for 4 years at that point it would all be drew out. We had our lawyer draw up a supplemental/special needs trust for these monthly payments to be directly deposited into so he would still qualify for ssi. It is a Medicaid payback trust. It is title The {my sons name} special needs trust.

        • Shannon says:

          It is a trust that you the payments are put into because it is more than 2000.00 and it would knock him out of ssi benefits. Going into this trust, ssi can not count it as an asset or income.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Shannon,

          Trusts are complicated and can be written in many ways, so I will not comment on the use of the funds from the trusts any more than to say that they must be reported to the Social Security Administration (SSA)so that SSA can confirm that the trusts do not count as resources. (Usually, payments (disbursements) from trusts that aren’t countable are countable income. If you have not reported the payments, you need to now.) If your son had a “dedicated account” funded by SSI back pa,y those funds can be used only for very limited purposes such as medical needs and vocational rehabilitation. Your son’s monthly SSI payments can be used for any of his needs. Food, shelter, medical care, clothing, personal care, education, entertainment, etc.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

          • Shannon says:

            He does not have a dedicated account. He just started drawing ssi in February of this year. They know about the trust and it has already been excluded as a resource. This trust it to be used as a “supplemental” trust for thing to make his life as normal and to do things he would not other wise get to do. What I am worried about is spending the ssi money on entertainment, personal care, vacation, etc. if there is any left over after all basic needs are taken care of instead of spending the money in the trust. This is a Medicaid payback trust. Like if he wanted to get internet service or dish network, is it ok to pay for them with ssi money rather than using the trust money since the internet and dish network are not basic needs?

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Shannon,

            As long as his basic needs are met, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) law allows the use of SSI funds for entertainment and other non-essentials. I cannot advise you about the trust account. I suggest that you get legal advice to find out whether the trust is affected by using other money to pay for things that the trust is supposed to cover.

            Sincerely,

            Kay

  228. Christine says:

    My boyfriend receives $480 a month in SSI benefits. We live together and have two children together. They are aware of our living arrangement and I am his payee. A few months ago he gained custody of his son from a previous marriage. The reason his benefits are so low is because I pay for most of the bills. My question is, since he is solely responsible for his son, should he be receiving more in SSI benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Christine,

      The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program does not provide benefits for dependents.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  229. fransisca says:

    My husband receives ssi and his father is his payee we lie together and pay bills together. My question is my husband decided to move out and break his responsibility of his portion of the rent/bills can ssi force him to use his ssi to help with bills?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Fransisca,

      Your husband’s disability benefits are for his support wherever he lives, so, no, the Social Security Administration (SSA) cannot force him to pay someone else’s bills. If he is receiving benefits as payee for a child that remains with you, you can apply to SSA to have the child’s benefits come to you so you can use the money to support that child.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  230. thomas thurman says:

    My friend has ssi and a church gave her a check of $100.00 will it effect her benefits or not?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Thomas,

      Your friend needs to report the gift. It will cause her Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to be reduced for one month. Irregular or infrequent income that exceeds $60 in a single calendar quarter is not excluded income.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  231. Shell says:

    Hi,
    My son has Down Syndrome and he gets SSI income because I don’t make enough money. He is 17 and we just had a review and this was done over the phone. Couple days later my son and I revived paper called the privacy act statement collection and use of personal information (SSA-8510). The worker wrote that they are conducting a survey and we need this form for you & son to sign. My question is do I have to sign it if it’s for a survey? And my son can not read and write there for he is in capable to sign it. I have never recived one of these papers before and why would I get one now? And what survey are they doing? I didn’t get any other papers asking questions or explaining what it was about.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Shell,

      If the consent is for a survey and not to determine eligibility, you are not obliged to sign it or participate in the survey.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  232. Pamela Smith says:

    Good Evening,

    I have a son that is autistic and was approved for SSI a year ago. The time during the application I was the only working in the household, my spouse was not. We separated last year. I didnt think about notifying SSI about his leaving because he wasn’t working and I totally forgot that I placed his name on the original application. Just this January 2014, I received a letter stating that my sons SSI was being stopped due to increase in household income. When I read the letter it had my separated husbands name and mine attached with income that he is receiving from VA disability. I never received any of that income nor it was ever spent on the household. I did appeal with the proper forms but they continued to say denied. I am new at this whole SSI process. My question is what do I need to do to prove to them that I have never received any of my ex disability income? He filed that in his own. I am more frustrated because I do not know what to do. I would greatly be appreciative with any feedback or instructions given.

    Thank you in Advance,

    Pam

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Pamela,

      You need to appeal again after you have gathered documents that prove the date you and your husband separated and that show the VA benefits did not begin until after the separation. The former could be separate rent receipts and/or utility bills for two different addresses. The latter would be the VA award letter. Be sure to appeal within the required sixty days. If your husband is also eligible for Social Security Disability, you need to apply for dependent benefits for your son on his father’s record.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  233. takeisha hayes says:

    Hi,
    My brother is a father and he has been approved for his benefits. What I would like to know is if they will send a letter to his child’s mother notifying her of his approval status? He has a delicate situation going on and we would like to know if she would be notified.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Takeisha,

      If your brother listed his child on his Social Security application, they will ask him who has custody and will contact the mother if they have the information to do so. If you think this did not occur and want to make sure that the child receives benefits, your brother can give the child’s mother his Social Security claim number so she can initiate the application for the child. Payment of dependent benefits will not reduce your brother’s benefit.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  234. Dalit says:

    My mother in law is getting ssi. She has
    Own house in India. She is USA citizen .can she still eligible for sis in California?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dalit,

      Your mother must report ownership of the house in India. The value of the house will be considered in determining whether her resources (assets) are within the resource limit for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  235. dorothy says:

    Hi I have a few questions. I wanted to ask for when I call social security about my changes. For number and address and my rent in housing of 75 a month and about 115-200 for electric and water 45. I get 721. Will it go down ? Is there I way I could receive more to help more with my 2 year old no way she could get it if I get ssi? If I try I wont lose my ssi right?.. my ssi goes to rent and bills and her needs and food. Dont get much in stamps

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dorothy,

      You are receiving the maximum Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If will not go down as long as you are paying all your own shelter and food costs. The SSI program does not pay dependent benefits. If your child is eligible for assistance from the state you live in, it will not affect the amount of your SSI.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  236. Thankful says:

    Hi Kay,
    Before I get to my question I want to say I think it is wonderful the service you provide here answering all these questions. Thank you!

    I know that as an SSI recipient I am not allowed to live outside of the US for more than 30 days but what if I am also a citizen of the country I am residing in? I have dual citizenship? Same rules?

    Thanks again!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Thankful,

      Yes, regardless of citizenship, the same rules apply to absence from the U.S. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is not payable to individuals living outside of fifty U.S. states or U.S. North Mariana Islands for more than thirty days or a full calendar month.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  237. Laurel says:

    My 21yo dgtr is receiving SSI. Can I pay for her to have a monthly cellphone without it affecting her benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Laurel,

      If you pay for the phone directly to the cell phone company, your gift of a phone will not affect your daughter’s SSI payments because a phone provides neither shelter or food.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  238. hello123 says:

    i am representative payee for my son who gets ssi. i recently got called in for redetermination appointment because of irs. now they want to see my taxes for past three years. Which i claimed married filing jointly with my boyfriend who does not live with me.(we are not married) will this affect my sons ssi?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Hello 123,

      I am not a tax expert, but I believe you have broken the law (tax fraud) by filing a joint return when you were not married. With regard to your son’s Supplemental Security Income, you need to prove to Social Security that your boyfriend is not your child’s father or, if he is, that he has not lived with your son while your son has been getting SSI. If your boyfriend has lived with his son, you will need to provide proof of his income and assets so your son’s SSI benefits can be recalculated.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  239. Karen Sanders says:

    My 11 year old son receives $721 a month in SSI benefits due to his autism. I usually get a large tax refund in February after filing taxes and am wondering what I will need to do as far as reporting this or if it needs to be reported. Also, do I need to inform my SNAP office of the recent approval off SSI for my son and will this affect my ability to get SNAP benefits any longer?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Karen,

      You do not have to report your tax refund to Social Security. You are required to report your son’s SSI award to the SNAP (food stamp) office. SSI benefits are considered in determining SNAP eligibility, so the SNAP grant may go down.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  240. Worried Mother says:

    Hello Kay- My son receives SSI and I allowed my ex husband to claim him as a dependent.He pays for child support for him and his siblings.I’m a full time student and did not work last year.Now SSI wants to know why my ex husband claimed him. I thought he was able to do so because he provides half of his support.Was this wrong?? Will they stop his benefits? I’m soo worried.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Worried Mother,

      The Social Security Administration (SSA) is checking to see if your son is getting more support from his father than the amount of his child support. If you have not already reported the child support to SSA, you need to do so promptly.

      There are specific tax laws regarding who can claim a child as a dependent on a tax return. You and your ex-husband need to check with the IRS to see whether your ex-husband can legally claim him.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  241. Jesse says:

    i plan on haveing my name changed to Rebecca Michelle i was born a male but plan on going threw srs do i have to report a name change and will me being transgender hurt my disability or ssi?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jesse,

      You are required to report your name change to the Social Security Administration with a copy of the court order for the name change. You may not have to give the reason. If asked, you can start out with “for personal reasons.” If in the future your claim is reviewed to see if you are still disabled, the gender change might become apparent in the review; however, being transgender should now affect your eligibility for benefits.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  242. Karen says:

    My 29 year old disabled son recieves benefits and lives in a facility. All his earnings are reported as required. We were recently advised that a monetary gift, ie: $40 for his birthday must also be reported, is this true?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Karen,

      All income is supposed to be reported to Social Security so that they can make a determination of whether it is countable income that affects Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment. However, a $40 one-time gift should be excluded (not count) if it meets the following guidelines as published on the Social Security website (www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/ssir/SSI10/Glossary.html)

      “Infrequent or Irregular Income
      “Income that is received either infrequently or irregularly that can be excluded from the determination of an individual’s income. “Infrequent” means that it is not received more than once in a calendar quarter from a single source and is not also received in the month immediately preceding or the month immediately following the month of receipt, regardless of whether or not these payments occur in different calendar quarters. “Irregular” means that an individual could not reasonably expect to receive the income. In any given quarter up to $30 of earned and $60 of unearned infrequent or irregular income is excluded.”

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  243. Vanesa Corral says:

    Thank you!!

  244. Vanesa Corral says:

    My daughter receives Ssi, I am her mother & the payee. This is her first year receiving benefits. They sent a questionere reporting for her 1st year. One question is how much I have saved for her, will they stop her benefits if no money has been saved?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Vanessa,

      Your daughter’s benefits will not stop because you have not saved any of the benefits. The benefits are to be used for her current needs first, before saving.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  245. Holly says:

    My 12yr old son receives SSI and I am his payee. I currently live with my father rent free and am unemployed. If my son and I move in with my boyfriend will his income effect my sons SSI?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Holly,

      As long as your son pays his share of housing (rent or mortgage and utilities, excluding phone) and his share of food, his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits will not be affected by the move. His share is the total cost for housing and food divided by the number of people in the household. Your boyfriend’s income will not affect your son’s SSI benefits as long as you are not married.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  246. Dominique says:

    Hi I have two kids who receives SSI benfits of 721 a month each. We stay in the state of Florida we are a family of 5 and we are relocating to another county. Will,the SSI PAYMENTS DROP DUE TO THE MOVE. I was told by a friend it would do to cost of living

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dominique,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is payable only to residents of the fifty U.S. states and the North Mariana Islands. The last month payable will be the last month your children are in the United States. You must report your move before you leave the U.S.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Dominique says:

        I’m sorry I was trying to say we stay in the state of Florida. We are moving to another county within the same state. I was told that my ssi benefit would change due to the cost of living. Is that true thx

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Dominique,

          My apologies, I misread “county” as “country.” SSI payment amounts do not change from county to county within the same states.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  247. Renee says:

    My 13 year old daughter (who currently lives with her grandmother in Ohio) receives SSI as well as her grandmother, she has come to visit me and has informed me she only get’s 20 a month out of her check for cloth’s and personal needs. The rest is used with her grandmothers for rent and so on! Her Aunt and her boyfriend live there as well her Aunt gets payed to take care of her grandmother! Can they use all her check except 20 to pay the bills with the others there or should I report this? I know social security allowed a car to be bought from her dedicated account years back (do to her heath) for doctors appointments it was in a wreck and she informed me they received 2000 for the car wouldn’t that be my daughters 2000 if they were informed the car would be hers when she was old enough… I greatly appreciate your help! They have told her I cant do nothing but I still have my parental rights, at the time I allowed her to stay with her grandmother because my daughter wanted to but if my daughters money isn’t being used for her I’m not happy about it and will handle that in court if I have to take custody back to make sure she has what she need but don’t know if what they are doing is against SS policy! I know that you can use it for shelter but her whole check shouldn’t the 2 other adults pay not just her grandmom and then all her check for all bills in the home?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Renee,

      It would be appropriate for your daughter’s grandmother to use your daughter benefits to pay one-quarter of the rent, utilities (excluding phone), and food. Perhaps you could talk with your daughter’s grandmother to see what percentage she is contributing. You might also talk with your daughter and find out whether her grandmother is also purchasing her cell phone service, a bus pass, paying medical co-pays, haircuts, etc. that your daughter is not thinking about to help determine whether money is being misused. If you think it is, you can talk with Social Security about it.

      It may be that the cash from the sale of the car that was purchased with money from your daughter’s dedicated account has to be spent for a replacement car or redeposited to the dedicated account. I suggest checking with Social Security regarding the rules on this.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Renee says:

        TY for responding my daughter is here with me for summer vacation and we have talked I have been told she gets 20 and thats it the rest her grandmother told me goes on bills and they did not get a new bar my daughter doesn’t know were the money from the care went… she doesn’t have cell phone or anything else. I believe that they are using her check to pay everything for all of them her and her grandmom’s check.her aunt get5s paid to take care of her grandmother but pays her car payment and stuff for her but not the bills and her old man is not working. And from what my daughter says her aunt forges the paper when her mom wont sign who would I report that to? I find it is un fair my daughter has not had a hair cut in 2 years and only gets 20 out of her money for personal stuff and cloths so from what you have told me already I believe I should report this would you agree I should she only has about 20 out fits last time she got new cloths was Christmas. And the 2000 was not deposited they used it my daughter is not sure on what but it wasn’t a new car
        TY again for your time and responses! You are a big help Kay!

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Renee,

          You are welcome and, yes, it sounds as if you should report the situation to Social Security.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  248. Joan says:

    My 26 yr old dtr is on SSI. She works part-time. There is a very good chance that she will marry a non SSI/SSDI person. She rents the condo that she lives in and has a car payment.

    He has a very old car and if they get married would rent out his house worth approximately 70k as his only income as he will be going to school full time. How does this affect dtrs SSI…will she loose because of house or will they just add his income of approx. 850.00 rental to hers?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Joan,

      If your daughter marries, her financial eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will be reevaluated considering both her and her husband’s income and assets. There is a $3,000 countable asset limitation. If they live in the house, the house will not be a countable asset. If they rent it out, it might be excluded as an income-producing resource. The income that will be counted will be the gross rent reduced by mortgage, taxes, property insurance, repairs, etc. A certain amount of the rental income will be excluded for her husband’s support. Any excess will be added to the countable portion of your daughter’s earned income. With regard to resources, note that the second car will count toward the $3,000 limit.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  249. Judy Hunt says:

    My husband has disability from SSI. My son took co-op his senior year where he worked half a day and got credit for it at school. Of course he made a small income as well. We just got a thing in the mail asking him to pay money back in since he turned 18. But they seem to be going on the whole year and not just the months after he turned 18. Is this correct? Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Judy,

      I assume that your husband is receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI) and that your son was receiving Social Security dependents benefits. My response is based on that assumption. There is an earnings limit to receive dependents benefits and a reduction of one dollar for every two earned over that limit. He may have exceeded that limit. Ask a Social Security representative to show you a calculation of the overpayment.

      There is one other thing to consider. If you son was still in high school student after he turned eighteen and was taking enough hours including the work credit, he was eligible for benefits until he graduated. If you have not presented proof of school attendance after age eighteen and do so, the overpayment might be reduced.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  250. tiffany says:

    My daughter receives survivors benefits will it effect her benefits if I get married or if I change her last name?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tiffany,

      Your daughter’s survivor benefits will not be affected by your marriage. Changing the child’s last name probably would not affect eligibility, but I would discuss the matter with Social Security before proceeding.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  251. Ray price says:

    I apply for disability 10/3/2013. and I received $975 by March. and I received $808 may 1 and another $808 may 30..but I didn’t receive nothing for the month of june..I want to know why? and when am I going start getting regular payments? Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ray,

      I think that your May 30 payment was for June because June 1, the usual payment day, fell on a weekend.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  252. Ashley says:

    I have question. My daughter is 3 and got approved for ssi. She was diagnosed with level2 autism. She was approved last Wednesday. I haven’t received any letters or anything from ssa . I called to check her status and they told me she was approved for ssi benefits. When will she start receiving payments? Is it a lengthy process to get your first payment? I applied for her May 6, 2014. So it only took them a little over a month to make the disability determination. Some say they make you wait 6 months after approved others say no. I’m lost!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ashley,

      Processing times vary greatly. If the claim is very clear cut and all the medical evidence is available, a quick decision is possible. You may need to give a financial update and provide bank information to get payment started. You can contact Social Security and request an appointment to do that.

      Sincerely,

      Kay