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What do I have to report to the Social Security Administration once I start to get SSI benefits?

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Find out everything you need to know about reporting changes for your SSI benefits and avoid SSI overpayments and underpayments.

ssi-benefits

When to Report Changes that
Affect SSI Benefits

When you receive SSI benefits you must report improvements in your health and any changes in your income, resources, and living arrangements to the Social Security Administration so that they receive the report by the tenth of the month following the change.

Who Needs to Report

If you are an adult and receive your payment directly, you are primarily responsible for reporting changes, however, your spouse or anyone whose income is considered in determining your payment amount can also report changes that could affect SSI payment. If you are a minor, your representative payee has primary responsibility for reporting changes, although any parent whose income is deemable may report.

If you are an adult with a representative payee, the payee is primarily responsible for reporting changes, but you can make reports yourself. For information about representative payees, see our articles “What Is a Social Security Disability Representative Payee? “ and “What Responsibilities Does a Representative Payee Have to Maintain SSI Disability Eligibility for a Child?

How to Report

You will need your Social Security number and, if you are reporting for another person who is the SSI recipient, the recipient’s Social Security number. You will also need the date that the change took place. You may report in person or by mail. In some cases you may report by telephone or online.

Why It’s Important to Report Changes

SSI eligibility is determined on a month by month basis. Everything that the SSA asks you to report could change the amount of your SSI monthly payment due in a subsequent month. For more information about when income is counted in determining benefits, please visit our article “When I Complete My SSI Application Form, I Am Asked to Declare My Income. Does All My Income Affect My SSI?

If your report is late, you could be penalized with a reduction in your SSI payment in the amount of $25 to $100. If you give false information or withhold important information that affects your benefits, you could be sanctioned, which means that the SSA could suspend your SSI payments for a period ranging from six to twenty-four months.

What to Report

1. You move or change your address.

In addition to notifying the post office, provide SSA with your new resident address and phone as soon as you know them, even if you have direct deposit or Direct Express® for delivery of your payment. This is important because SSA has to review with you your new living arrangements to determine whether your payment amount should change or remain the same. Additionally, if your mail from SSA is returned your payments may be stopped.

If anyone else who is moving with you gets Social Security or SSI benefits, tell SSA their names too. If your move involves moving into or out of someone else’s home, be sure to let the SSA know as the change might increase or decrease the SSI benefits you are due.

2. You change direct deposit accounts.

When you want your SSI benefits paid to a different bank account, be sure to keep the old account open until the first payment goes into the new account. It takes thirty to sixty days for SSA to process the change.

Be sure to sign up for direct deposit with your financial institution. Another alternative is to call the SSA and have your direct deposit information changed over the telephone. You will need both your new and old bank account numbers handy when you call SSA. You can find them on your personal checks or account statements or on the paperwork the financial institution gave you when you opened the account.

3. If you receive an incorrect SSI Payment that is wholly or in part not due to you, notify SSA immediately and be prepared to return the overpayment at the time you file the report.

4. Your health improves.

If you are getting SSI because you are disabled and your health improves substantially, you must report the improvement so that the SSA can determine whether you are still disabled according to SSI disability laws and still eligible for payment.

5. Someone moves into or out of your household or a member of your household dies or is born or adopted.

This report is important because SSA may need to recalculate your benefit because such a change may result in a change of in-kind support or deemed income. For a discussion of how living arrangements affect your SSI benefits, see our article “Why Will Social Security Ask about my Living Arrangements When I Apply for SSI Disability?” For an explanation of deemed income, please see “Why Do I Have to Give Information about My Family’s Income and Assets When I Apply for SSI Benefits?

6. You start or stop work or have other work-related changes.

Report right away if you start or stop work. Let the SSA know when there is any change in your work duties or pay or when you start working for a different employer. Be prepared to provide the following information: your job title, job duties, work hours, rate of pay, and the name and address of your employer. Additionally report if you start or stop paying for work expenses that are related to your disability.

Wages need to be reported monthly by mail, by fax, or in person so that they are received by the tenth of each month. If you qualify for telephone reporting of wages, you must report by the sixth of each month.

If you are self-employed, you must provide equivalent information for self-employment activity and provide SSA with an estimate of gross earnings and business expenses. You must also maintain business records and provide SSA with a copy of your federal income tax return annually.

7. There is a change in your income or the income of family members.

You must report all changes in your income including new income and income that ends or changes in amount. Be prepared to provide verification of the change. SSA does not count many kinds of income against your SSI payment, but the laws governing income for SSI are quite detailed. Therefore, it is important to report all changes, rather than trying to determine what is and isn’t countable.

If you are married and live with your spouse, you also need to report changes in your spouse’s income and in the income of any children in the household. The only exception is that you do not need to report increases in your Social Security benefits.

If your child under age eighteen gets SSI and lives with you, you also need to report changes in the eligible child’s income, your income, and the income of any child in the household who does not receive SSI benefits as well as the other parent’s income if the other parent also lives in the household.

8. Changes in marital status.

If you or an SSI-eligible gets married or divorced, report the change in status to the SSA so that they can refigure your SSI payment. Also report if you become separated from your spouse.

9. You change your name by marriage, divorce, or court order.

Report your name change as soon as possible so that you do not encounter problems cashing a check, using your Direct Express® card, or receiving direct deposit of your SSI benefits.

10. There is a change in your resources.

Tell the SSA if there is a change in what you own. Many assets do not count toward the $2,000 limit for individuals and $3,000 limit for couples, but it is best to report all acquisitions and dispositions to avoid overpayments. Report immediately if your resources go over the resource limits. Sale of an excluded asset may affect your eligibility in the following month, so it is important to report the sale of real estate or an automobile.

If your child is receiving SSI, then it is necessary to report both changes in what the child owns and what the child’s parent owns if the parent lives in the same household.

If you are getting provisional payments while trying to sell a resource, let the SSA know as soon as the asset has been sold and retain the funds from the sale to repay the provisional payments.

11. Someone starts or stops paying for your living expenses.

Let SSA know if someone gives you money, food, or free housing or if someone pays for your food, utilities, rent or mortgage. Also, tell SSA if you stop receiving such assistance.

12. You enter or leave an institution.

Report as soon as possible if you enter or leave a hospital, nursing facility, intermediate care or residential institution, halfway house, prison, jail, or public emergency shelter or any other kind of institution.

Your SSI may or may not continue depending on the type of institution, the length of your stay, and who covers the cost of the stay. Report promptly to avoid possible overpayments. It is a good idea to arrange in advance for a friend or relative to report such a change to SSA in the event that you are unable to do so. For more information about how residence in an institution affects your SSI eligibility, see our article “Why Will Social Security Ask about my Living Arrangements When I Apply for SSI Disability?

13. You leave the United States.

For SSI purposes, the United States means the fifty states, the District of Columbia, and the Northern Mariana Islands. It does not include Puerto Rico. If you plan to leave the United States, tell the Social Security Administration before you leave. Provide the date you plan to leave and the date you plan to return.

Usually, you are not eligible for SSI after you have been outside the United States for thirty or more days in a row. Then you have to be back in the U.S. for at least 30 days in a row before you are again considered a resident. There are some exceptions. Dependent disabled children of military personnel assigned to shore duty overseas may be eligible to receive SSI while they are living abroad. There are also some exceptions for students studying abroad.

14. You are under age twenty-two and have a change in student status.

If you are under age twenty-two and are working, report to SSA the date that you start or stop going to school or change the number of hours per week that you are enrolled. The amount of SSI benefits you are eligible to receive may change based on your student status.

15. The SSI recipient’s representative payee dies or misuses funds.

If you become aware that your funds are being misused or that your representative payee dies, report this immediately to the Social Security Administration so that it can arrange for another representative payee. If the SSI recipient is not able to make a report, anyone becoming aware of such circumstances can report.

16. You stop working toward your PASS goal or change your goal.

If you have a Plan to Achieve Self-Support, which is also called a PASS, and you stop following the plan  or change your goal, you must report the change because you may no longer be eligible to set money aside for the PASS and your SSI benefit may be reduced or terminated.

Additional Reporting for Aliens Getting SSI

1. Your immigration status changes.

Some immigration statuses allow for the receipt of SSI benefits. Others do not allow payment or limit the period of time you can get SSI. Therefore, it is very important that you report any change in your immigration status. Usually if you become a U.S. citizen you can continue to receive SSI. If your status changes from a refugee or refugee-similar immigration status to becoming a permanent resident, your SSI may continue for a time.

2. Changes in your sponsor’s and your sponsor’s spouse’s income and resources.

If you came into the U.S. with a sponsor, who must report changes in your sponsor’s income and resources and changes in the income and resources of your sponsor’s spouse.

Things Other People Should Report for Your SSI Benefits

1. The person receiving SSI dies.

Report to SSA as soon as an SSI recipient dies. Any SSI payment that has not been cashed or deposited before death is not due and must be returned. Additionally if the deceased’s SSI payment was being sent to a bank, any monies deposited after the person’s death must be retuned to Social Security. Notify the bank as well as SSA. The bank will take care of returning the funds.

2. Any change that occurs at a time that the SSI recipient is not well enough to report.

Arrangements should be made in advance for someone who is in frequent contact with the SSI recipient to report any changes that the recipient cannot report.

3. The SSI recipient is no longer able to manage his or her funds.

Someone should report to SSA if the person receiving SSI loses the ability to direct the use of his or her funds so shelter, food, medical care, other basic needs are met before less basic purchases are made. Should this occur, SSA can appoint a representative payee to receive the SSI payment and see that the SSI recipient’s needs are met.

Additional Reporting if you live in California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York or Vermont

If you live in one of the named states, also report the following changes, which may affect the amount of SSI state supplement you are eligible to receive.

California—Let the SSA know if you were regularly eating your meals outside your home and start eating at home—or vice versa.

New York—Report if you were regularly eating your meals outside your home and start eating at home—or vice versa. Also report if you live with other people and begin to prepare your own meals by yourself rather than preparing meals with others in the household—or vice versa.

Hawaii, Michigan and Vermont—Let SSA know if you live in a facility that provides different levels of care and your care level changes. For example, you might move from an assisted living apartment to a nursing home in the same facility.

Massachusetts—Tell the SSA if you or you and your spouse either stop paying or start paying more than two-thirds of the living expenses for the household in which you are living.

Just a reminder: Any of these changes may result in a change in your SSI benefits. A prompt telephone report by the sixth of the month after the month in which the change occurs or an in- person or mail report received by the tenth of the month will protect you from overpayments or underpayments.

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455 Comments

  1. Sarah says:

    If I’m 15 and my mom gives me my check and I buy my own food and. Cloths and stuff I need with it I support. Myself with it my mom is always gone I’m almost 16.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sarah,

      Did you intend to ask a question?

      Kay

    • Ruth says:

      Hi, I have two children that receive $721 in SSI payments every month. I have 4 kids in total. Their SSI payments is how I pay for rent, and my rent is $980 a month and that’s not including the electric, gas, phone bill. I plan on getting a job to be able to make ends meet. Will social security stop my kids payments once I start working?

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Ruth,

        Depending on how much you earn, your work earnings could either have no effect on your children’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments or only lower the payments somewhat. Given that you have two non-disabled children and two SSI-eligible children, you would have to have fairly high earnings to cause the children’s SSI to stop completely. You can ask Social Security to give you estimates of the amount you can make before your earnings start to affect the SSI payments and also the top amount you can earn before payments are terminated.

        Sincerely,

        Kay

  2. Andrea Gibson says:

    I have SSI currently and called in a change of address 1 yr ago but it apparently did not take. I received a letter now stating they need this information and willingly will provide it. My living expense has NOT went down but instead increased from $180.00 monthly to $440.00 monthly in rent. I am worried I will loose my benefits and check. I am 29 yrs old and have Epileptic seizures 2-4 times daily causing falls and need this. What do you think in this matter?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Andrea,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) non-medical eligibility is redetermined usually once a year, so the contact from the Social Security Administration (SSA) is likely routine. Whether or not your move, which was not processed at the time, will affect your payment amount depends on whether anyone else is now paying your shelter expenses or you are living with others and you not paying your share. If you are paying your own expenses, an increase in shelter costs will not cause your SSI to go down.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  3. Leah Hill says:

    My son is 6 and gets SSI, I have an appointment for a review and I have to provide bank info from 2011-present, last year I let 2 of my family members use my bank account so they could have their federal income tax deposited, will I get penalized for doing so? I also read the uncounted income and it did state that federal income tax was not a countable income, is this true? Or will my sons SSI get reduced or cut for this?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Leah,

      Too bad you can’t turn the clock back and not let your family’s tax refunds go into your son’s account.

      Tax refunds are not countable income for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) if the refund is tax that was paid by the SSI recipient. Technically, all money that goes into your son’s account is income to your son because it moved into his legal possession and he had access to it and could have used it (through his payee, you.) I don’t know if Social Security can make any exception to the application of the law. But, here’s what I suggest. Take the following to the interview: copies of your relatives’ 1040 tax forms (and state filing forms if state tax is also involved), copies of the checks you wrote to your relatives transferring the money to them, a statement signed by all three of you stating that you let the money be deposited to your son’s account as a favor and that the money was not intended to be his and was not used for him.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  4. rahz says:

    Do I need to report work study income to SSA?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rahz,

      Yes, you need to report work-study income to the Social Security Income (SSA) because it is work earnings.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  5. Natasha says:

    I’m 19 yrs old and I receive $744 a month from ssi but my rent is $700 will they increase the amount that I am gettin or will it stay the same .

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Natasha,

      The maximum Supplemental Security Income (SSI) federal amount is $721. If you are receiving SSI of $744, I assume that part of it is an SSI state supplement. If you have not yet reported the rent of $700, you should do so right away to have your benefit recalculated based on your current circumstances.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  6. Brother says:

    Hello I have a question I do not receive benefits, but I would like to know if someone is the payee of a child and they get married to someone that works a job and do not report it. Is their a penalty for that?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Brother,

      My response is based on the assumption that the payee you refer to the is the child’s parent.

      First, if the child is receiving Social Security Disability (SSD) or Social Security Retirement (SSR) dependent benefits, the marriage of the payee (parent) does not affect the child’s eligibility for benefits.

      On the other hand, if the child is disabled and is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, the marriage of the payee (parent) could affect the eligibility of the child to receive benefits. The payee (parent) need to report the marriage right away, so that the Social Security Administration can determine whether the child is still eligible for SSI benefits and, if so, for what amount. There are penalties for failing to report changes that can affect payment amount, the most serious of which is being charged with fraud. The payee may be able to minimize penalties by reporting now, even if it is a late reporting.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  7. Mary Hagood says:

    My husband is moving back with his parents. What will I have to do to reinstate my ssi payments

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mary,

      Report to Social Security as soon as your husband leaves the household. If it has been less than twelve months since you were eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you will not have to file a new claim. If it has been longer, you will have to file a new claim and get a medical decision of eligibility.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  8. tiffany says:

    My son receives ssi benefits each month for the amount of 744 he has autism I recently lost my job is there a way to increase his benefits to help out with everything or am I screwed? My rent is 1245 and my husband only makes 250 a week how can we get help

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tiffany,

      If your son is receiving more than $721 monthly, part of his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment is SSI state supplement. Because part of the payment is state supplement, I don’t know whether he is already receiving the maximum possible. I recommend calling 800-772-1213 and requesting an appointment to report a change in income. Then take proof of your last day of work to the interview, plus your and your husband’s pay stubs since the last date you provided them and verification of any unemployment benefits you are getting or have applied for. You might also apply for food stamps or report the change to the food stamp office if you already get them. Energy assistance to help with heating bills may also be available through your power company or a local nonprofit organization.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  9. allison says:

    Dear kay ,
    my son gets ssi and i just moved and have an appointment with ssi coming up. I dont have a lease or rental aggreement i just rent a house from a family friend and pay him Cash each month for rent.. what proof do i need to show proof of residence if i dont have a mortgage or lease? is a utility bill fine? Will my son lose benefits? thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Allison,

      Get a receipt from your friend for the rent that you paid. Have the receipt show the address and the month(s) for which you paid rent. I suggest that you get a receipt each month in the future so that no question arises.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  10. Charles says:

    Dear Abby,

    I am the representative payee for my daughter who is 37 years old. I fill out the payee report right away each time it comes. Well social security keeps sending me letters back saying that I did not fill the last one out which was 5 months ago. I sent it in twice, now i am getting a third request. What is going on??? What will they do if they keep losing the report? Will my daughters benefits stop? What happens in cases when social security, even though it’s their mess up, thinks you are not filling out the report??? I have to wait until Monday to call, but hopefully I can get an answer before then. Thank you so much.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Charles,

      It is hard to say why your multiple representative payee reports are going astray. If you kept photocopies of the prior reports, I suggest attaching the photocopies to the current report and including a cover letter indicating that you did submit the missing reports. If it is possible for you to do so, I suggest taking the whole packet to a Social Security office and requesting a written acknowledgement that it was received. As far as repercussions to not filing a report, you daughter’s benefits could be suspended while SSA looked for another payee for her; but you should be able to get this straightened out so that it doesn’t come to that.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

    • red says:

      Im getting the same thing done to me. Im sending mines back and they keepssending me one. But even though I don’t have all the receipts can the change the check into someone else’s name and who would they get

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Red,

        I am not totally clear about what you mean in your posted comment, but if you are saying that you are a payee for someone and do not want to be. Contact the Social Security Administration again and ask them to stop sending you the checks. They may ask for a final accounting. You can complete it the best you can with the information you have.

        Sincerely,

        Kay

  11. Charles says:

    I’m sorry, I don’t know why I said Abby. I meant Kay. My apologies.

  12. Adrian M says:

    Hello, I was just wondering how long does it take for the 1/3 reduction to be taken off. I called SSA 2/24 and notified of the change of living arrangements as to I am paying rent to my grandparents and I receive SNAP benefits as well as faxed a letter to my local office. I’ve called my my claims rep and received no call back as to confirmation should I go in or should i wait because wouldn’t I be underpaid??
    thank you for your answering my question

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Adrian,

      As a measure to minimize overpayments, with only a few exceptions, changes in income affect Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits two months later. For example,if you started to pay rent and buy food with SNAP in February, your SSI payments will go up in April.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Adrian M says:

        Thank You Kay. I actually called yesterday as was advised that I should go in because my caseworker looked at my file 2/28 and made no change so the representive I spoke to said my payment should have risen and to personally turn all the paperwork in.

      • Adrian M says:

        Thank you Kay for the response so if thats the case would recieve a notice in the mail when the change has applied?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Adrian,

          Yes, after you have gone in and given all the information to Social Security about the changes in your living arrangements, you should get a notice of change. The notice will be mailed out as soon as the change is processed if the increase in your benefits should have already occurred. It the increase will take effect in a future month, you may not get a notice until sometime in the month before the increase is due.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  13. d'nine says:

    If my son receives ssa disability and is required to pay rent he gets 783 a month. can i get his rental amount and his payment out of his check and sent directly to me since he has stopped paying me. he is on my lease but refuses. to give me his part.

    thank u.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear d’nine,

      You cannot have part of your son’s check sent to you. If your son is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), not Social Security Disability, his payment amount depends in part on paying his own shelter costs. Therefore, if his is getting SSI, one choice would be to tell your son that if he doesn’t pay his share of the rent, you will have to correct the statement you gave the Social Security Administration and that his SSI payment will be reduced because he is not paying rent.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  14. Teresa says:

    Hi. I am on ssi and my sister has been giving me money to save up for buying a car. The car we have is old and standing on it’s last leg. I have been putting the money in a savings account and have not yet spent it. Recently I gave it back for her to hold for me. My savings account will show I went over the $2000 resourse limit and I am worried I will lose my benefits. Can a relative give you money to replace a resource? I thought I read that somewhere. What should I do?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Teresa,

      I believe that the money your sister has been giving you is income for SSI and you should have been reporting it. Depending on the amount, had it been reported on time, your SSI check might have been reduced. This means that you may be overpaid SSI. You are ineligible for benefits in any month that your countable resources are over $2,000 on the first of the month, regardless where you keep the money. (You don’t mention being married. If you are married and living with your spouse, then the resource limit for the two of you is $3,000.) Once you spend the money to buy the car, the more valuable of your two cars will be an excluded resource. The value of the second car will become a countable resource the first of the month after you own two cars and until you sell the second one. Then the cash from the second one will be a resource.

      I believe that if your sister had saved up money herself and not given it to you and then bought you a car, paying for it directly, and if the car was your only car when she gave it to you, then the gift of the car would not be income because the car is not cash, food, or shelter and is an excluded resource.

      Your next step is to report all this to Social Security, so they can sort all this out and let you know where you stand.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  15. Steven says:

    My girlfriend receives SSI benefits and lives with me and my family. My mother is her payee. Is it misuse of the benefits for my mother to never let me, nor my girlfriend, use the card? I’ve only seen the card once, and that was only because it was on her table in her room while I was talking to her. I understand that it’s not for me, but my girlfriend has never actually used the card. My mother refuses to give it to her, and tells her that if she needs something, she’ll get it. My mother also refuses to buy certain things when she asks, like fast-food, cigarettes, etc. My girlfriend is a shy person, and would not confront my mother about the issue, but she does get tired of never being allowed to use the card. I’m just asking if she’s supposed to do this, or if she technically can. Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Steven,

      Your mother is correct in not giving the DirectExpress card to your girlfriend. As her representative payee, your mother should retain control of the card and pay for most things for your girlfriend. Social Security does say that if money is left over after paying for food, housing, medical care, hygiene and other necessary supplies, a small amount of money should be given to the disabled person to spend as they see fit–even if it is spent on something the payee does not approve of. (An exception to this would be if the disabled person were spending the money that involved her in illegal activities.) It is also your girlfriend’s right to ask for an accounting of what has been spent and of how much money is being held for her.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  16. Guadalupe says:

    I’m asking a question for a friend. My friend receives Ssi his mother is his payee. If he moves to a different state can his mom still be his payee from another state

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Guadalupe,

      It would be difficult for your friend’s mother to continue to serve as payee for your friend because a payee needs to be aware of the ongoing needs of the disabled person.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  17. Kishell says:

    I am the payee for my soon to be ex husband. We have separated and he has moved out. I know I need to report this asap but wanted to know if there are any other documents I will need to send as well? Also I will no longer be his payee so does he need to go change that or do I?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kishell,

      When you report your soon-to-be-ex husband’s move, you need to take information about his new living arrangements including proof of rent and anticipated utility costs. If he is living with other people, you will need a list of the other people in the household. You will be asked how much of the shelter costs he is paying and whether he eats separately or with other members of the household.

      As far as changing payees, it would be helpful to your husband to have the new payee in place before you bow out. That way he won’t be left without funds. That said, you need to sign a statement giving the date by which you will no longer serve as payee and, if you can, recommend a new payee. If your husband is now capable of handling his own funds, he can apply to be his own payee with a supportive statement from his physician. If not, he can suggest another person to be payee. That other person will be required to file an application to be payee. You also need to tell Social Security how much of his benefits you still have on hand and either turn the money back to Social Security to be reissued or give it to the new payee (and get a receipt) when you stop being payee. If you receive funds for him after the date you resign, you should return them to Social Security.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  18. Missy says:

    My 8 year old son has just been approved for SSI. My question is on how to spend his money. I know it says for shelter and food. Do I need to divide it in half? My mortgage is 400.00. Can I use his money to pay the full $400.00 or do I have to divide it by the number of people in the house? We have 4 people. So would I use only $100.00 of his money to pay the mortgage?? Same question on utilities, food etc. I am going to keep a separate notebook with all the receipts and payments and I want to make sure I am keeping it right.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Missy,

      It is good that you plan to keep records of the use of your son’s benefits. It will make reporting very easy. Because your son is a minor living in your household and your income is considered in determining his payment amount, he does not have to pay any specific share of the shelter and food costs. I suggest that you make a spending plan for the benefit listing all your son’s needs, such as medical care, school supplies, clothing, childcare while you work, etc. That should help you decide how much have hime contribute to the household’s mortgage, utilities, and food. One more thing to think about: If the other two in the household are not part of his nuclear family (his father or siblings) then you want to be careful that his income is not subsidizing their share of shelter and food expenses.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  19. Susie says:

    Hi
    My 4 y/o daughter has autism and receiving $721 ssi benefits. My husband works as a construction worker and opened a seperate business bank account to accommodate a customer from a different state. And will have to deposit $5k dollars into his account to buy materials and pay him for labor. Will that deposit make my daughter ineligible for ssi even if part of that money will be used for materials?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Susie,

      I think that the cash flow through your husband’s business account for operational costs is considered an income-producing resource and that it doesn’t count toward the resource limit. The draw or paycheck that your husband pays himself is income should be reported and at the end of the year you will have to submit a copy of the tax form on which he reports his income, expenses, and profit. I recommend that you make an appointment with a Social Security claims representative, not a service representative, to double-check my understanding and also to discuss the way they want his self-employment income (draws from the business for person and family use) to be reported.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  20. Steph says:

    I have a question i recieved back child support of a total of $950 which is for my son who recieves ssi. Im his payee i reported it 1-2 wks later. I called ssi today to make sure my change was in the system. Which ive had numerous of problems where they said no change was report ect ect.. I always report my changes.. So i called today they said that i will be overpaid for april.. I dont see how this is my fault when i done my part. Their saying i wont get a month or more of ssi benefits for my son. Which at the moment were using to keep a roof over his head. How should i go about with this??

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Steph,

      It is correct that your son would not be eligible for SSI in the month that you received $950 child support for him because his income of $950 is more than the allowable income limit to receive even $1 SSI. Presumably, they are withholding a month of benefits to collect the incorrectly paid amount. Either you will need to use the child support for that month’s expenses; or if you have already spent the child support money, you could ask the Social Security Administration to collect the overpayment over a period of three or four months.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  21. Aaron says:

    My 1 year old daughter gets SSI due to her disability. I was told that my pay stubs must be provided every month to SSA and that dropping them off in their drop box is the best method according to our local office. I received a letter stating all benefits will be cut off due to non reporting of mine and my daughters wages even though all pay stubs have been provided. My daughter has no income or wages and now we are being told there was an overpayment. What is your advice to get SSA to realize that a 1 year old does not work and to remedy them stating they never received my pay stubs?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Aaron,

      Please clarify the following, so that I can respond regarding the overpayment and the unprocessed stubs.

      Did you get the overpayment notice after you resubmitted stubs?
      How many months stubs did you submit that they say they did not receive?
      Does the overpayment cover any of those months?

      With regard to their requesting your child’s pay stubs, a lot of evidence requests are formats, one size fits all. I wouldn’t be concerned about their asking about the baby’s work. You can just ignore it.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Aaron says:

        We got the over payment after resubmitting the pay stubs. They are claiming 3 months of stubs this time and yes the over payment does cover those months. They are asking for my pay stubs and hers and in the past only requested mine. we have ignored the past request for stubs as they usually send us a letter a week later saying they got them. I have been unable to get anyone at SSA to address them wanting her wages, all they say is to submit her stubs.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Aaron,

          I suggest that you review the facts used to determine the overpayment. If they are incorrect, appeal. If the facts are correct, then the overpayment will be correct because the calculations are done electronically. You can request waiver of collection on the basis that it would be a hardship to repay and that you reported on time in the manner they requested and so the overpayment was not your fault. The waiver may or may not be granted. If it is not granted, request the overpayment be collected in installments. As far as their continuing to request the baby’s pay stubs, as long as they don’t suspend benefits for not submitting them, I would just ignore that.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  22. Jennie says:

    My 11 yr old daughter is disabled and receives the full 721 a month, my husband just moved in with us and he is receiving benefits also of 721 a month I am wondering if us living together will it cause either one of their monthly benefits to decrease and I am currently awaiting a court hearing for my disability claim and I am unemployed I was wondering if I am approved will it affect the amount? My husband was also wondering with me not having income am I able to draw a check off of him? I don’t know if this makes a difference but we also have another child who doesn’t receive anything an both children are his stepchildren

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jennie,

      Based on the amount your husband is receiving, I assume that he is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. My response is based on that assumption.

      His moving into the household, where the only income is his and your daughter’s SSI should not affect either of their benefits; however, his moving in does need to be reported both for his claim and your daughter’s claim.

      SSI pays benefits only to the disabled person, so no dependent benefits are payable to you or the children because of your husband’s eligiblity. If you are approved for disability and it is Social Security, not SSI, and your family maximum is high enough, dependent benefits will be payable from your earnings record for the children. Depending on how high your Social Security and the dependent benefits are, the SSI benefits might be affected somewhat. Be sure that if you are approved, that you tell Social Security that your husband and child are getting SSI so their claims can be reviewed for any necessary recalculation. Note: if you receive SSI, not Social Security, then your husband and daughter’s SSI will not be affected.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  23. I am my nephew payee,he is living in a facility,pending an investigation what do I do ?do I need to report because it has been a month now or a little over that he has been there.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Stacie,

      You need to report your nephew’s new living arrangement as soon as possible. Depending on the type of facility he has moved to, he may not be eligible for the same amount as is now being paid. I recommend not using this month’s benefits you receive until you find out that he is eligible to receive them. If you do, you may be responsible for repaying the overpayment.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  24. Ken says:

    I have a 44 year old disabled person (cerebral palsy) that has come to live with me. She had lived with her parents but they could no longer take care of her because of her mothers medical condition and wanted to put her into a home. I have been taking her out to dinner, shopping and other activities for the past 12 years and could not see putting her in some home. She did not want to go into assisted living. She gets two checks each month, one shows SSA ( I assume it off her father’s earnings as he is retired) and a small amount for SSI (under $70). She has a bank account for direct deposit but I do not have access to it because it is still in both her and her mom’s name. She just started living with me this month and she will be helping with living expenses (housing and utilities). I have been trying to get her address and other information changed with the local SSA office, but each time I have been down there, it has been over 2 hour wait and I left.

    How will moving in with me affect her benefits? I had her order checks so that she will have proof she is paying part of the living expenses. She gets both Medicaid and Medicare in addition to her SSA and SSI. I want to ensure that whatever I do, she does not lose any benefits.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ken,

      I am assuming that your friend’s mother is her payee and manages your friend’s benefits. My response is based on that assumption. I suggest that you call the Social Security call center at 1-800-772-1213 to get an appointment in the local office to report a change of SSI living arrangements and, if your friend has a payee, to apply to be her payee. It would be very helpful to have a letter signed by your friend’s mother that says that she can no longer care for her daughter and be her payee due to her health and that she recommends you as payee.

      If you are made payee, you will need to get a bank account with the title “friend’s name by your name,” which shows that it is her money, but you are the only one with access. Her mother should close the existing account AFTER the first payment is received in the new account and should transfer any of her daughter’s funds to you for deposit in the new account.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  25. heather says:

    my son is 8 and gets ssi for autism. I got a new job on feb 3 2014 and didn’t report the change until april 1. I told them I started march 24th because it was later than the 10 days you have to report and I was scared. now I am scared that they will find out. what will happen?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Heather,

      You need to contact Social Security immediately and set the record straight. Tell them you want to correct an error in the date you reported. Give them the correct date and all you pay stubs you have received since then. Your child may be overpaid for April if you received a paycheck in February, so I suggest holding onto the SSI money for April until you know whether you have to pay part of it back. If you correct the false information quickly, you probably can avoid allegations of fraud. (Keep in mind that a certain amount of your income will be excluded as a work incentive and a certain amount we be allocated for your support so not all your income will count against your child’s SSI payment.)

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  26. Kyla says:

    Hello I have a question my grandfather wants to get a bank loan and I was reading the guideline for ssi and it say as long as you spend the money before the next month ssi does not count it as resources if that’s true does he have to show what he got with the loan. Thanks hope it makes sense.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kyla,

      First, a true loan is not income for Supplemental Security (SSI) income calculation. You are right that if he held onto the money and still had it on the first of the following month, it would be resource counting toward the $2,000 resource limit. It would be good for your grandfather to keep proof of what he used the money fo so he can document it at his next recertification. He would not have report the use until his next annual recertification if the money is spent on something like payment ohis medical bills. However, if he buys a vehicle, he should report that. If he has only one vehicle he uses for transportation, the vehicle will not count as a resource. If he were to buy something like a boat to go fishing, the value of the boat would count toward the resource limit. Lastly,if he plans to use the money for someone else, he should find out first if that will keep him from getting SSI for a while because he gave away resources.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  27. heather says:

    thanks kay! I am on it. can they see on their system the date I started working?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Heather,

      No, Social Security does not have that detailed information about start and stop work dates. There is, however, an end-of-year automated computer interface between the IRS and the SSI system that will reveal the discrepancy in amounts reported and amounts earned.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  28. Robin says:

    my son gets ssi i started working i wanted to know will that affect his payments its not a study job sometimes im out of work for weeks and then when they do call me its like four or three hours like two days a week ..

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Robin,

      As you describe work hours, your work earnings may be low enough that they will not affect your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. You need to report your start work date and your earnings to Social Security as soon as possible. If you son continues to be eligible, you will be asked to submit your pay stubs once a month (be sure to keep copies). Your earnings will be used to calculate your son’s benefits two months later. For example, Your March earnings will be considered in calculating his May benefit. (Note that not all your work earnings will be counted. Some will be excluded as a work incentive and some for your support and the support of your other children, if any.)

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  29. Sheila says:

    Can you rent to someone who is on SSDI and if I am on SSDI??

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sheila,

      If you are receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI) and not Supplemental Security Income (SSI), your living arrangements do not affect your benefits and you do not have to report changes. You can rent to anyone you want and make whatever financial arrangement you want for food.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  30. Sheila says:

    Will that affect my benefits at all if he only helps with food?

  31. Saharah says:

    Hi ms Kay,
    Pls help me understand how a money on the bank will be counted as income or asset for someone receiving ssi. My husband is self employed and I believe our resource limit is $5k for our child receiving ssi and us as a couple.
    If a certain amount is deposited today and will be spent down the next day for business purposes and not personal use. Will that still be counted to the resource limit for that particular month. Even when nothing stays long or nothing at all on the savings account. As for our income ssa only ask for my husbands Annual tax report. Now Iam confuse, savings to my understanding is money in the bank that stays long In the savings account and earns interest each month. We definitely don’t have that. Pls help me know if my understanding is correct. Thank you!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Saharah,

      If your husband has not already done so, he needs to open a business account and have all the money related to the business cycle through that business account so that it is clear that the money that comes into your family-use account does not represent money available for family use and is counted as income for SSI payment calculations.

      Money received in the course of doing business if kept to the following month is considered an income-producing asset and will be excluded when counting up resources. This means that if your husband gets an advance on a job in one month and uses the money to buy material in the next, the money would not be a resource on the first. However, this is true only if you can show that the business resources are clearly separate from the family’s resources. A separate business bank account accomplishes this.

      With regard to resources (assets), one kind of countable resource is money in a bank account–checking or savings. You and your husband can have $3,000 total countable assets. Your son can have $2,000 total countable assets. (It would be a good idea to find out if Social Security is counting anything else you own toward the resource limits.) Resources are counted on the first of the calendar month. Money that is received and spent in one month does not count as a resource for the following month.

      Note that any money saved that is your son’s should be separated from your funds and be placed in a bank account titled “your son’s name” by “your name, representative payee.”

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Rob says:

        What if someone doesn’t want ssi benefits for his child anymore? Should he just call ssa and tell them to stop it?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Rob,

          If you applied for the child initially or, in some cases, are the representative payee, you can request that SSI payments be terminated, but not retroactively. If the claim is undergoing a redetermination, you will be expected to provide everything requested to verify the child was paid correctly since the last redetermination. You have to submit a signed request with the date you want benefits to end; a phone call won’t do it. Also, if there is an existing overpayment, you will be expected to pay the overpayment.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

          • Rob says:

            Hi I appreciate your reply. But what is the ssa-521 withdrawal form which says that if u want to cancel ssi benefits you will be required to pay back all benefits received?

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Rob,

            To withdraw an SSI application, you must repay all SSI benefits received. It is as if the application never existed. You will not have to repay Social Security benefits. If you simply want to stop benefits, you should be able to make a statement (not on an SSA 521) that you want to stop benefits beginning with a certain future date.

            Sincerely,

            Kay

            Sincerely,

            Kay

  32. Michelle says:

    I just had my review for both of my children pertaining to their SSI. The case worker that I spoke to said that there was some differences in the income that I had reported and what they had in their system which I am assuming came from the IRS. I think it is because of work bonuses that I received but last year when I had a review I was told by a different worker that I did not have to report those bonuses. I also called the 800 number and called my previous worker and reported a pay out of $5000.00 from a retirement account from a previous job. Apparently that was not fixed because I was questioned about that as well. Also the worker that I had the previous time told me to report only net wages. But I was told yesterday that it was gross wages. So all this time I have been doing this for the past two years and I have a huge overpayment. Now I am scared that my children will not receive their benefits due to an employee who told me wrong information and never reported wages that I called in. Also for the longest time one child was getting more than the other child because they were basing her amount on my previous jobs wages and I had not worked there for 6 months. The case worker that I had did not change everything with my daughters information. When I had my review just recently I was asked if I still owned a car that I had got rid of 2 years prior. So now I feel like I am screwed because I was given wrong information. What can I do?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Michelle,

      First the facts and then possible actions you can take.

      You must report gross wages, including work bonuses. The $5,000 payout from the retirement account would be income in the month it was received if you had no access to it until your job ended. If you had any of the payout left the following month, the amount left would count toward your $2,000 resource limit. Any amount above the $2,000 would be split between the two SSI eligible children and count toward their $2,000 SSI resource limits.

      You can do two things: First you can file a request for waiver of overpayment claiming that the overpayment was not your fault and you cannot afford to repay. Request that collection be deferred while your request is pending. Try to find anything you have that supports you were told to report incorrectly. If your request is denied, you can request collection be spread out over a length of time with only partial withholding of benefits each month.

      Also, if the request for waiver is denied (or it is still pending when the sixty-day appeal period is close to ending), you can appeal the amount of the overpayment on the child whose benefits were underpaid in the past. This of course assumes that Social Security did not eventually correct the calculation and pay back benefits due. In the appeal, request a review of the calculation of her claim back to the time that you stopped working.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  33. Jon says:

    My severely autistic son who is on a casein, gluten,corn and soy free diet is receiving SSI as I applied for him 4 months after his 18th birthday. (After I finished the court guardianship at the They are taking away 1/3 rd of his SSI because before SSI I was paying for all his food. (He did not have any money so of course I was paying for all his food)

    Now that he gets SSI, (as his guardian and payee)he is using his SSI to pay for all his own food. He is also going out to eat twice a week and his SSI funds are being used to fund his food.

    I would really prefer not to charge him rent because his food bills (special dietary restrictions) are so high and I’d rather use whatever funds he has left over each month for his entertainment.

    My son is severely autistic and requires 24/7 supervision which we give besides when he is in school.

    My wife and I are his guardians by the court as my son is incapacitated. I have to shop for his separate food, take him to the restaurant yet I pay two separate bills when the check comes. One from his debit account for his food and my restaurant food bill. I buy my sons food at health food stores for him and only him. My wife and I food shopping is completely separate from my son food.

    We never eat his food and he never eats ours. His food requires separate preparation and he usually eats his meals before us. Once we have prepared his food we place it on the table. He eats it and by the time we finish preparing our foods he is finished eating. I realize it sounds untraditional but that’s how we have done it. His casein, gluten, corn, soy free diet needs to be extremely strict to be effective.

    My son is entitled to 721 a month from the federal government but 1/3 rd is being withheld because we used to give him shelter and free food before ssi.

    Now with him receiving SSI, I am having him use his SSI funds to pay for his food separately.

    How much of the $ 241 (out of the 721)they are keeping will this 18 year old autistic adult living with us (not paying rent) who is going to a special needs school be able to recover.

    I hope this makes sense.

    Thanks in advance.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jon,

      The SSI program was established to cover disabled and aged persons’ basic needs of shelter and food. If the individual is receiving free or partially free shelter or food, that need is met and the benefit is reduced by the value of the support and maintenance. The maximum reduction for support and maintenance is a one-third reduction.

      In your son’s case, the reduction was initially for free food and free shelter. Now that he is paying for his own food, he would not have reduction for free food. However, if your son does not pay his share of the rent (or mortgage) and utilities (excluding phone), he will still be subject to the reduction,though possibly not a $241 reduction. (His share is one-third of shelter costs if there are three people in the household; one-quarter, if there are four, and so on.) An increase could occur if he were to pay his share or enough of it that you were subsidizing him in an amount of less than $261. Or, if you were to rent him a room and treat him as a roomer, depending on whether or not he was paying market rate for the room or, if not, depending on the amount you were subsidizing the rent, he might be eligible for an increase.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  34. Matt says:

    Hi.

    I am thinking about getting a car but will need a loan of ~$10,000 in order to do so. Do I need to report either or both of these actions to SSA? (loan and buying a car) – this would be my only car that I personally own.

    Also, currently I live with my Mother and Stepfather who are both disabled. How will my SSI be effected if I either move to live alone? With my Sister who is not disabled?

    In any of these cases above, will my SSI go down? Up?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Matt,

      A true loan is not income for calculating Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. When you get the car, you do need to report it to SSA. It will be an excludable resource, but it does need to be on record. Also, you will be asked for proof that you purchased the car with a loan.

      If you live alone and pay for all your own shelter and food expenses, you will be eligible for the maximum SSI of $721 less any other income you have such as Social Security. Similarly, if you move in with your sister and pay market rate to rent a room and provide your own food or you pay your share of the rent or mortgage and utilities and provide your own food, you would be eligible for the maximum less other income. I do not know whether your SSI will go up, go down, or stay the same because I do not know the amount you are receiving now or how it was calculated.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  35. Cindy says:

    Is a child that is currently receiving ssi responsible for his overpayment when he turns 18 or the payee he has will still be?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Bobbie Jo,

      Depending on the cause of the overpayment and the circumstances under which occurred, the payee may be responsible. I suggest you discuss the matter with a claims representative at the Social Security Administration.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  36. KG says:

    If im working & my child receives ssi will her ssi benefits stop?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear KG,

      Whether or not your work earnings affect a child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) depends on the amount you earn; whether you have other children in the household; how much income those children have; and, if you are married to the child’s father, whether he is in the household; and whether or not he has income. A certain amount of your earnings is excluded as a work incentive and a certain amount is allotted to your support and the support of other ineligible (not getting SSI) individuals in the family.

      You can find additional details in the article “What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect an SSI Application for Children?” under the SSI tab of this Disability Advisor website. You can also go to the Social Security Administration and provide an estimate of the amount you would be earning and they can provide an estimated calculation.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  37. Teneka Minix says:

    My grandma’s friends gave money to buy house. I been homeless since 2004. My grandma passed away on June 15 2012. Her friends didn’t know she passed away. Now know I am homeless. Here is the problem, if am on SSI. They don’t want there name to be know. Because of that I worries I go ahead buy the house. I get a lot of trouble. I don’t know what to do.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Teneka,

      Unfortunately, I do not fully understand the situation you are describing. Please go into more detail. Did your grandmother’s friend’s give the money? Who owns the house now? How much were you given? When? Were you living with your grandmother before she died? Did you report that to Social Security? In whose name is the house now? When did you become homeless? Or are you still in the house? When you answer these questions, I will try to provide some guidance.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  38. Susie says:

    Hi ms. Kay
    My child receives 721 ssi benefits. It just started 5 months ago. My sister in law won a lawsuit case and gave $5k to my husband to help him get a used family car 2 weeks ago.He deposited the cash money in the bank and then last week we bought a second hand car and used the money for downpayment. Iam aware I need to report this immediately to ssa. I just want to know Aside from the contract or proof that we now have a second car What else do I need to bring with me when I report it? Do they need anything else? Like bank statement etc.? I’m sure this will put an end to my child’s ssi. But I want to make sure if be bringing complete document.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Susie,

      Your child may be ineligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) in the month in which your husband received the $5,000. If he bought the car in the same month and if the family has only one car or a special reason for needing two cars, then only one month of SSI will be affected, the month the money was received. If the money was received in March and the car was bought in April, the child could be ineligible in March and, depending on other family assets, possibly in April. After that he or she should be eligible again.

      To answer your question, you need to give Social Security a statement from your sister-in-law regarding the amount and the date of the gift, a copy of your bank statement or other printout that shows the deposit, and documents that show the date the car was purchased and the make and year of the car.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Susie says:

        Thank u for the response! I appreciate it! I just have 2 more questions, We feel it’s a bit awkward to ask for a written statement from my sister-in law, we dont want to bother her anymore after she has given us a gift. Do we really need to push on getting a statement from her? She now lives in a different state. And doesn’t use any other form of communication aside from phone calls.
        Would it not be enough to show cash deposits in the bank?
        And what are those acceptable special reason in having a second car?

        • Susie says:

          We were thinking of asking her to send us a statement via snail mail. But my husband said his sister isn’t that patient enough to do extra favor for us.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Susie,

          Because you don’t want to request a statement from your sister-in-law, then I suggest that you offer the bank statement as proof of the gift and see whether Social Security also asks for a statement from the giver. In general, to have the value of a second car excluded from counting toward the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit ($2,000 for individuals and $3,000 for couples), you would have to show that your family’s needs could not be met with one vehicle. Basic needs usually include transportation for employment and medical treatment.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  39. Char says:

    My friends son gets ss for his adhd and just got expelled….is she gonna loose his benefits

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Char,

      If the minor child is receiving disability benefits, he must be receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) not SS (Social Security). The child is not required to be in school to receive disability benefits. However, if he was working while in school, his mother does need to report his expulsion because disabled students have special work incentives that exclude some work earnings from counting in the SSI payment calculation.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  40. Kim D says:

    Hi. If someone dies and leaves you their retirement account and you have to pay off their bills and funeral expenses with it. Do you have to still report it to SSI? I have never filed income taxes before because I can’t work. I don’t want to lose my Medicaid and wonder how this works?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kim,

      You need to talk with the Social Security Administration and provide the paperwork that shows you inherited the money and any paperwork you have that shows your obligation to pay the deceased person’s bills and funeral expenses. Depending on the amount of money you received, you may be ineligible for Supplemental Security Income for a time. If your income remains low, you may qualify for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) with a government subsidy to help pay the premiums or you can use some of your inheritance to buy insurance until you are again eligible for SSI and Medicaid. You should keep receipts to show how the inherited money is spent. It would also be a good idea to get information from the IRS about the tax laws governing inherited retirement accounts.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  41. jessy says:

    Hi I was approved for ssi in march pf this year I have to have a payee but I live alone im a single mother of three my mother ans and I would like to know if I pay my own bills a keep the receipts for everything would I get ib trouble for her not paying everything I have a mental and depresstion problem but I know how to manage money but my lawyer said I didn’t what should we do

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jessy,

      Technically, your mother, who is your payee, should be handling all the money, except a small amount of spending money if available. However, it would be reasonable for your mother to pay the shelter and utilities bills directly and, if you do not have addiction problems, give you the remainder of the money to handle. You would want to keep receipts to give to her every month so that she is able to report to Social Security annually as to how the money was spent and can also see that you are meeting your primary needs before discretional spending.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  42. stephanie says:

    I don’t have a comment I just have a question my daughter is two and I applied for ssi for her I. Was told that I had to nturn in recipets for every thing that was bought . I just need to know this things before gets accepted

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Stephanie,

      If I understand your question correctly, you were being given an explanation of the responsibilities of a representative payee, which would become effective once payments start. If that is what ;you are inquiring about, you would begin to keep receipts after you start getting Supplemental Security Income (SSI) checks for her.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  43. Marcia says:

    I am on SSI receiving $720 a month. Can I deposit my tax return check into my bank account even though it will push it over the $2000 limit and is it considered income? I also just this month adopted my granddaughter who had been in foster care. She is considered at risk because both parents suffer from substance abuse among other things. therefore I will receive $450 a month until she reaches the age of 18 for her care. Is this considered income since it is for her care and not mine and must it be reported?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marcia,

      The tax refund is not income; it is your money coming back to you. Resources (assets) are counted on the first of each month. It does not matter whether you deposit the refund or just cash the check, any of the money that is left on the first of the following month will count toward the resource limit of that month. If you are over the limit, you are responsible for reporting that and returning the SSI payment for that month.

      It is my understanding that if the adoption assistance is considered to be income for your grandchild, then it will not affect your SSI benefits. I suggest taking the documentation of the assistance payments to Social Security to double check.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  44. Todd Harris says:

    Hello Kay,

    Many thanks for the information you’ve provided and your willingness to answer questions from readers.

    Can a person’s entire SSI payment go towards rent (for example, the person receives $721/month in SSI and uses this to pay their rent which is $721…is this allowed)?

    Or is there a stipulation that only a certain percentage of the SSI payment can be used for housing?

    What if they live in a rooming house (private living quarters and bathroom but shared kitchen and dining space) where meals and utilities are included in the rental rate?

    Todd

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Todd,

      You can use your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to meet any of your needs in the way you want. You could, in theory, pay your entire SSI check for room and board (food). However, doing so would leave you no money for personal hygiene items, clothing, transportation to medical appointments, or medical co-pays. Accordingly, it might be good to reserve some money for other needs. Note: if you qualify for food stamps, the value of food stamps is not income for SSI calculation purposes.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  45. altonio coney says:

    The question I have is my kids mom receive ssi for our son he lives one week with his mom and the other week with me his dad, his mom just moved a guy in that helps with the bills and daily living does she have to report that, also I know the check is for his living expenses but she never send anything for him while he is with me no food of his liking or clothes I never ask for any of the money but is seems more like fraud what do you think?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Altonio,

      Your son’s mother does need to report that someone else has moved into the household where your son, who receives Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is living. Upon report, the Social Security Administration (SSA) will review and determine whether your son is receiving in-kind support and maintenance from the new person in the household. It would be appropriate for your son’s mother to give you money for your son’s food for half the month. Perhaps you can have a discussion with her about that.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  46. Michelle says:

    My daughter won her Ssi case when she was 4yrs old and received a lump sum of 8000 dollars which she could not touch until she was 18. She is now turning 18 and like her I also receive Ssi, will her Ssi stop because she is now entitled to touch the back Ssi money that is in the bank. And will that money affect my Ssi payments as well? I do not get how the Ssi gave her the money to begin with then hold it against her and me once she becomes 18.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Michelle,

      The dedicated account to which you refer is intended for very specific purposes. Those purposes do not include regular shelter and food costs or other daily needs. Those restrictions continue to apply after your child turns eighteen, so the account does not count against the $2,000 resource limit. Your child can use those funds only for the purposes defined by Social Security–some of which are medical care, education, job training and rehabilitation. You can get more information at the following Social Security webpage http://www.ssa.gov/ssi/spotlights/spot-dedicated-accounts.htm. Note that for SSI benefits to continue after age eighteen, your daughter must meet the definition of disability for adults, which is slightly different than that for children. She needs to apply to have benefits continued after her 18th birthday.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  47. Vikki says:

    My daughter receives SSI and lives with my husband and me. I remarried so my husband is her step-dad. He just retired and applied for social security. During the process, he was informed that my daughter may be eligible for SS benefits, and before a decision is made about possible entitlement he must file an application. We would like to continue with her current SSI benefits. My husband would like to receive the benefits that he is entitled to. If we do file, which we may no choice in doing, how will his benefits and her benefits be impacted?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Vikki,

      There are many variables involved in your situation. It will take an application and formal review to determine the exact impact of the change in your husband’s income, but we do know that your daughter’s receiving Social Security benefits will have no impact on your husband’s benefits.

      You are right that because your daughter is receiving SSI, she is required to apply for all other possible benefits including dependents benefits. For your daughter to be eligible for Social Security benefits as a stepchild, she had to have been financially dependent on your husband, which means receiving half of her support from him, at one of certain points in time. If your daughter qualifies for Social Security dependent benefits and your work earnings are not too high, you might qualify for young wife’s benefits.

      Even if your daughter doesn’t qualify for benefits on her stepfather’s account, it is possible that her Supplemental Security Income (SSI) may be impacted by his receiving Social Security instead of work earnings. A larger amount of work earnings can be excluded in calculating a child’s SSI payment than is excluded from parental unearned (non-work earnings) income such as Social Security. However, if his benefit is low, there could be no change or even possibly an increase if she was not already receiving the maximum.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  48. nico says:

    hi,

    my grandmother(disabled) is receiveing SSI and she’ll be out of the US for exactly 28 days. do we still need to report to SSI about this?

    thanks,
    nico

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Nico,

      Your grandmother does not have to report being outside of the country for a visit of less than thirty days.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  49. Malcolm Rush says:

    Hi. I supposed to be off the one reduction rule this month and Social Security is saying im not contributing enough to get off it, despite the fact that im no longer receiving free food and shelter.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Malclm,

      To receive the maximum Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit, you must pay your share of housing (and food costs if you share food) if you are sharing expenses or pay fair market value for room or room and board. If you are sharing, your share is one half if there are two in the household, one-third if there are three in the household, one fourth if there are four, and so on. If you think an error has been made, make an appointment to have the claims representative show you the facts used in the calculation and how the calculation was done. If you still think there was an error, you have the right to appeal within sixty days. (A side note: If you started paying your share this month in May, the increase in your SSI would not occur until July.)

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  50. rose says:

    Me and my mom receive ssi i get it for my 5 yr old son and she gets it for her i currently made changes cuz we just moved our rent is 700 and we both split the bills in half and the rent as well … but she just recently got a call from social security asking her if anybody else lives with us and if i was responsible in paying the rent and if i was helping her out….. why would they ask her that if we have always helped each other and after we had made changes?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rose,

      Every time a person who is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) moves, living arrangements (who lives with you and who pays the shelter and food costs) has to be reviewed to determine the continuing SSI payment amounts. For your mother’s and your son’s SSI not to be affected by your living with them, each of them has to pay at least one-third of the shelter (rent and utilities, excluding phone) and either buy their food separately or pay one-third of the food costs.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  51. Shannon says:

    My sister is getting SSDI and her 15 year old son wants to come stay with me ( in the same state) will she lose any of her benefits? She will still be paying for his needs.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Shannon,

      If your nephew comes to live with you and is receiving Social Security dependent benefits, then it would be appropriate for you to apply to be his payee and to use his benefits to pay for his shelter, food, clothing, medical care, school supplies, etc. If you sister is purchasing health insurance for your nephew with part of his benefit, that should be continued. Your sister will not lose any of her own Social Security benefits but may be impacted by not having her son’s income to help pay for housing costs where she is living.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  52. Roberta Rosa says:

    Hello, Im married and I get SSI,i have send in a copy of my husbands check in per month due to him being the one with a income, we decided to buy a house, the loan is in huby name since he has the better credit score,we currently pay rent at $600 a month, the mortage with insurance and taxes will come up to about $500 a month, but we will also have to pay for city sewer/waater and garbage pick up all on one bill for about $70 a month ,now we just have to pay $20 for water where we rent,will my monthly amount go down cause the amount ofr housing is less or will it stay the same since owning a home will involve more cost in a whole?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Roberta,

      As long as your family’s income does not change and you and he are paying all the housing costs, including utilities, your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will not change.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  53. Beady says:

    I have a 10 year old daughter that receives Survivors Benefits. She has received benefits for 10 years now and I have never completed a payee report (I know I should). I generally use the money to buy clothes, shoes, etc for her. The benefits are generally deposited on or around the 3rd of the month. The benefits weren’t deposited this month and I am wondering if my failing to complete the payee reports have anything to do with it. I have not received anything by mail stating that the benefits will be terminated. What should be my next course of action?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Beady,

      I recommend that you contact Social Security to find out why your daughter’s benefits weren’t paid this month. You do not say whether your daughter lives with you. If she does not, the adult who has physical custody may have applied to be her payee. If you continue to be payee, be aware that her benefits can be used for part of the shelter and food costs in addition to clothing, school supplies, medical care, a reasonable allowance but none of the money should be used for you or other people. If the full amount is not needed, it should be saved for college, job training, or other future needs.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  54. Angie S says:

    Hello
    My question is my grandson is on ssi disability his mother gets the check every month. Since 03/31/2014 he has ben living with me and their papaw. We have been given custody by the state. She does not have a suitable place for the family to live. We have not received any money from her except 20.00 dollars for Michael to go on a field trip with his school. Should we be getting his ssi? Thank You.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Angie,

      Yes, you should apply to be your grandson’s representative payee as soon as possible. Take a copy of the custody papers to Social Security if you have them. Also, your grandson’s mother should have given you all of his April and May SSI payments to cover his shelter, food, clothing, school, and medical expenses and a small age-appropriate allowance.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  55. S P Fell says:

    Someone wants to put me in their will, but I am on Disability and know that I can not have more than $2000.00 in the bank. I don’t think they have a lot of money, my guess would be it was under $5000.00, if that much. Do I have to report it and will I lose my disability. I know they are trying to be kind to me but I am afraid hat in the end it would hurt me not help me. Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear S.P.,

      Being named in a will does not affect Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility. When the person dies and you actually get the money, in that month, the inheritance would count as income and you would need to repay your SSI for that month.

      If you still had more than $2,000 on the first of the following month, you would not be eligible in that month because you would be over the resource limit. Of course, you could use the money to pay debts, purchase needed clothing, dental work, and medical care. If you don’t have a vehicle, you could buy a car and insurance for it. Overall, even if you were ineligible for two or three months while you used the money for things you needed, you would come out money ahead for SSI. (If you receive other benefits such as food stamps or a housing subsidy, you might want to find out what the impact of receiving an inheritance would be on those benefits.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  56. S P Fell says:

    One more question. What if you loaned someone money in the amount of $10,000.00 2 years before you became disabled and 3 years after you were on Disability, would that money be taken from you, as well?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear S. P.

      I do not understand your question for sure. Are you saying that you have received or expect to receive repayment of the $10,000 loan while you are receiving SSI benefits? If so, the repayment of the loan probably would not count as income, but any amount of it that you still had on the first of the following month would be a resource. Your SSI would be stopped for any month you were over the limit because you would not need SSI to meet your shelter and food costs, which SSI is intended to cover. If your assets dropped below $2,000 again in less than twelve months from the first month you were ineligible, you would not have to file a new claim to get benefits started again. You would need to show how you spent the $10,000 that you were repaid, so you would want to keep receipts.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  57. Teresa says:

    I presently receive S.S.I. monthly benefits (as I have for years now). I previously dealt (something similar to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder mostly because of a really bad marriage that I should have gotten out of sooner, but was not able to do for numerous reasons at the time). I recently have been feeling enormously better and have usually continued taking college courses. In addition to the above-mentioned, certain negative obstacles have been recently removed from my daily “path” and I’m feeling confidant to try traditional employment. Previously, I was an incredibly dedicated traditional home-maker who successfully raised 4 children. (In addition to his being controlling and abusive, my former husband was a gambler who ultimately abandoned me when I was still raising our youngest child as well as supervising one adult child who had a specific medical condition then, however is doing well now). NOW : MY QUESTION : Can the SSA Administration try to “force” me to apply about 9 months EARLIER than I INTEND to do IN ORDER to INSURE my receiving my FULL AMOUNT in monthly benefits for my future RETIREMENT BENEFITS, of which I SORELY will need to FULL AMOUNT ? In will TURN age 66 in February of 2015, IN WHICH I WILL be eligible to THEN apply for my COMPLETE and FULL monthly benefits “on my former husband’s record” as it was a lengthy enough marriage AND we had a divorce settlement through my previous attorney and a pension was “split 50/50″. And, as the pension (which only $300.00 for me, because my former husband had not done some technical thing in order to make it twice that amount) IS PRIVATE PROPERTY BECAUSE it is “part of the divorce settlement”. I already KNOW that it CANNOT be “deducted” from my FUTURE SSA Retirement Benefits. HOWEVER, it would be DETRIMENTAL to me for me to APPLY EARLY for my future retirement benefits – even about 9 months early as the an alleged local “employee” of the SSA Administration is all-of-a sudden attempting to “pressure” me to do ! And, I have been PREVIOUSLY told -when contacting OTHER SSA representatives at the National : 800-772-1213 number that it is MY CHOICE WHEN I WANT TO start receiving my future SSA retirement benefits ! I’m really appreciative for ANY help and guidance in this present matter. Thank you !

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Teresa,

      The general rule is that SSI recipients are required to apply for all other benefits for which they are eligible, including Social Security retirement benefits. However, there may be an exemption that does not require you to apply for reduced retirement. I suggest that you ask the representative to research if that is indeed an exception. If she says it is not, then ask to see a copy of the regulations that state that you have to apply for early reduced retirement.

      Best regards,

      Kay

  58. Terry says:

    Hello,

    My question is both my mom and brother have moved in with me and both have SSI. I work and so does my husband so 4 total in the house.

    We have totaled all the expense rent, electricity, water. And have split it 4 ways. Equal in share and provided them with receipts to show proof they are paying at the address.

    The food is separate they buy their own food and have separate shelves.

    I don’t contribute any money to them to help pay for anything (would like to but me and my husband have our own set of bills)

    Do I need to to provide them with anything written like a rental agreement or something.

    What would they need from me when they call to update address status and let them know they are living with me. They are in the time frame to call to make changes.

    Will mine and my husband income effect their benefit, I hope not as I can not help with anything for them.

    Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Terry,

      Your income and your husband’s income will not affect your mother’s and your brother’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. They will need a letter from you that states there are four people in your household and that your mother and brother each pay is one-quarter each of the rent and utilities and that they each buy their own food and prepare their food separately. You may also be asked to provide a copy of your rental agreement or receipt and of your recent utility bills.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  59. cory says:

    My daughter recieves ssi..if i am eligible for it too will itbdetermain how much we recieve since we live in the same house?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Cory,

      If only you two live in the household and you both receive SSI, Social Security will assume that neither of you is supporting the other and that neither is receiving in-kind support and maintenance. You would each receive the maximum based on any other income you had with no reduction related to subsidized housing or food.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  60. Becky G. says:

    If a child is approved for SSI does the amount they receive as a child affect their retirement amounts later in life?

    Let me try to clarify. A child with ADHD receives SSI benefits as a child then as they grow older they are able to gain employment and work full-time. They then are no longer eligible for SSI benefits. When it comes time for them to retire will the benefits they received as a child negatively affect their SS retirement benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Becky,

      Receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) childhood disability benefits has no effect on how Social Security retirement benefits are calculated later in life.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  61. Joanna P says:

    Dear Kay–
    I know that once you are out of the country for more than 30 days, your benefits stop and will only start again after being back for thirty days. Can I ask what would happen with payments if travel was from July 3rd until August 25? Would I receive payments for July, then have to wait until Sept 25 and receive a payment for September? Will the October payment come at the beginning of the month? Thank you!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Joanna,

      I am assuming that you are inquiring about Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and that you are a U.S. citizen. My response is based on that assumption.

      If you go out of the United States for thirty days in a row or for a full calendar month, you must be back in the United States for thirty consecutive days before benefits start again. Additionally, SSI is not paid for partial months. In your example, if you were to leave the U.S. on July 3 and return on August 25, you would be eligible for the July payment, but not August or September. Your SSI checks would resume for the month of October. It’s worth noting that even if you decide to leave the U.S. for less than thirty days and less than a full calendar month, you do need to report to Social Security before you go, giving them the dates that you will be outside the country.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  62. Flora Hart says:

    Hi Kay,

    My son is a 17 year old junior in high school and gets partial SSI benefits because of my income. When he turns 18, will he be able to receive the full payment since he doesn’t have a job?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Flora,

      Three months before your son turns eighteen, he should apply for continuation of his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits because at that time he has to qualify as an disabled adult, which is somewhat different than a disabled child. If he is approved and pays his share of the household’s shelter and food expenses or moves to live on his own, he could qualify for the maximum SSI payment.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  63. Concerned Mother says:

    My adult daughter, who lives in California, is coming to visit us in Utah. How long is she allowed to visit in Utah without changing everything regarding her address etc ? We don’t want her to do anything that will create a problem for her receiving her SSI or her medical coverage.

    Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Concerned Mother,

      If your daughter continues to maintain a residence in California (pays ren, leaves her belongs there, and will be returning to the same residence after her visit), her visit to you is just that, a visit not a change of residence, so being away from home should not affect her Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If you provide her with free food while she stays with you, the free food is infrequent and irregular in-kind support and maintenance. It is countable income to reduce her SSI if the value is more than $60 in a single calendar quarter; therefore, it could be to her benefit to chip in for food while she is with you if she is staying long.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  64. karen says:

    I am the rep payee for my now 23 year old son who recently moved into an adult group home setting. I provided the change of address to Social Security via phone but didn’t realize when I was sending in the forms they send that the change of address didn’t go through. He now gets limited income from his job in the day-hab program and I am reporting that as required. The problem is that I just found out (when I questioned why the paperwork stated his food and shelter is valued at 240./month) -he pays 420./month and SS is stating they never got a change of address. They also told me I have to come in to discuss this but I cannot take time off my job. His payments from SS have gone down due to his income and I am barely able to pay his rent.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Karen,

      I recommend that you ask your employer for enough time to have a telephone interview, such as an extended lunch hour, (which would be less than taking time off work) and then ask Social Security for a telephone appointment, explaining that you can’t take time off work. You can also get a statement from the adult group home as to the date that your son moved in, the amount of rent he is paying and whether it covers food also or he is getting food stamps.This should be enough to straighten things out.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  65. suzanne says:

    Hello,
    I receive SSI..for the past year ,due to my husbands income , I have been
    Receiving only a part of my benefit and medicaid. My husband is moving out,
    So I will be reporting the change , my son is 21 and he wants to move in to help me out physically, he works part time..he will pay for his own food but that’s is all he can afford. Will his income count like my husbands did? Will I receive my full benifits? Will there be any proofs required for these changes?
    Thank you
    Suzanne

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Suzanne,

      Your son’s income will not affect your Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Additionally, your son’s paying for his own food will not affect your benefit, which will likely go up after your husband leave’s the household. I suggest getting statements from your husband and son. Your husband’s statement should include the date he moved out, his new resident address, and whether or not he will be providing you with any support from outside the household. The statement from your son should say that he will be buying his own food and will not be contributing toward shelter expenses.

      Best regards,

      Kay

  66. Marie says:

    I now have joint power of attorney over a little girl I have been raising since birth. The other woman that I’m sharing custody with is the payee on her ssi check. I ha her half of the time and she has informed that she will be keeping all of the check. Is there anthing I can do about that?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marie,

      I suggest that you discuss the situation with the Social Security Administration and ask them for their advice. The payee does have to spend all the benefits for the child’s basic needs so it would be appropriate for her to at least be giving you some of the money to cover her food when the child is with you.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  67. Andra says:

    Hello Kay,

    I just recently filled out an application to be my son’s payee and it is still pending. I believe they are waiting on me to send in copies of my custody papers that I am still waiting to receive in the mail. How long can they keep his case pending and do they continue to suspend the payments to the current payee, which is his father, while it is pending? I showed them a copy of my minute order saying that I have full/sole physical and legal custody of my children plus copies of his school records and denial for welfare benefits.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Andra,

      I would expect that the Social Security Administration would suspend your son’s payments once you presented proof that he was in your physical and legal custody. I suggest that you contact Social Security to find out whether benefits have been suspended and also to double check that they are waiting for the full custody papers and not for something else. Tell them that you are still waiting for the full custody papers and that you will submit them as soon as they are received. Also ask if there is anything else you need to do. As long as they know that you are trying to provide requested information, your application to be payee should be held open.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  68. Bea says:

    I am receiving SSI benefits and want them to stop. My fiance was paying our rent, and that is already coming out of the SSI. We had a discussion and he decided that he will pay all of my expenses from now on- food, utilities, medicine, etc. Can I report this conversation as a change? Will I need some kind of proof? Will I have to wait until we get married? Thanks for your time.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Bea,

      You can simply submit a statement to Social Security saying that you want your SSI to stop effective with a certain date, such as June 1 and then return the June 1 check. Before finalizing this decision, you might consider the value of Medicaid insurance if your Medicaid eligibility is tied to your SSI. If you can get health insurance elsewhere, it might be very expensive. (If your fiance has health insurance through his employer, you may be eligible on his plan once you are married.)

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  69. Andrea says:

    My boyfriend has a son who received SSI and medical due to severe Autism. I am not the child’s biological parent. If the father and I marry, how would that affect the son’s benefits?

  70. Stephen says:

    I have a “friend” who receives SSI but his mother is the payee. He is 19 and is moving to go to college in August. She is moving to another state in about 30 days. He wants to become his own payee but is having trouble getting a note from a physician noting his physical and mental state to be his own payee. Does he need a note to change his payee?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Stephen,

      If your friend is having trouble getting a capability statement from his physician it may be because he is not capable of managing his benefits. That said, he can apply to be his own payee explaining that he and his current payee will be in different states. They will either make him his own payee or discuss other options with him.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  71. Mary says:

    I have a question.. I have a cancer and receive 721 SSI. I have one dependent child 10 y.o. My mother sent money from Russia on my name for my son. How it can be considered as a gift to my son or to me??? If she sent more than 4,000 per year do I need to claim it as an income or as a gift to my son? can this affect my SSI payment?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mary,

      If your mother is sending money for your son–not for you–and you don’t want the money to affect your SSI, she should send it in your son’s name only. You can open a bank account in his name for the money to be deposited. It would be even better if she could transfer the money electronically to the account in your son’s name. With regard to the money that she has already sent, you need to report that to Social Security. Explain that it is for your son; however, your mother’s intent may not keep the money from counting against your SSI payment because it came in your name.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  72. Brittany says:

    I receive SSI and I didnt receive my check yesterday but everybody else I know that receives SSI got theirs yesterday.. and I never received a letter saying that im getting cut off of it… what should I do??

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Brittany,

      I assume that the “check” you refer to is actually a deposit to a bank account or DirectExpress card. If you do not have the money in your account or on your card by now, check with your bank to see if it was received but not credited. If that doesn’t provide answers, contact the Social Security Administration to report non-receipt.

      Sincerely,

      kay

  73. Charles says:

    Hi. Can i reinstate my ssi over the phone if i cant find my ID?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Charles,

      I need more information to respond. Why did your SSI stop and how long has it been stopped? Also, what type of ID you are referring to?

      Thanks,

      Kay

      • Charles says:

        Ok i currently still havr ssi. But i left the state for a few months so when i came back they said they coulsbt issue payments because there wasnt a valid address. I was told to give them one and they can re instate me in a week.

        Do i need my state id or can i do it over the phone

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Charles,

          You can start the process by telephone, but you may be asked to present your passport to prove the dates you left and returned to the U.S. and proof of your U.S. residence such as a rental receipt or utility bill in your name.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  74. Jackie says:

    My brother receives SSI. His car is on it’s last leg. If he sells or trades this car in on another vehicle, will this affect his monthly benefit?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jackie,

      Changing vehicles will not affect his SSI assuming that he is not given money to do so.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  75. Wesley says:

    Hi, If I currently receive SSI supplements in the form of Medicare/Medicaid and I am a U.S. Citizen, would I have to reapply for Medicare/Medicaid if I were to leave the country for over 30 days? I understand that I will not receive these supplemental health benefits while out of the country but I was wondering if I could put the status on hold to be reactivated upon my 30 consecutive day return or if I’d have to completely re-do the application process.

    Thanks!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Wesley,

      If you are out of the U.S. for more than thirty days or for a full calendar month, you have to be back in the U.S. for thirty days before your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid would be reinstated. For example, if you left the U.S. in June and returned the middle of August, your SSI would start again in October. If your benefits are suspended for twelve months, your eligibility will be terminated and you will have to file a new application. You must report your absence to the Social Security Administration before you leave.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  76. Shannon says:

    If I use 70.00 of my own money to open the account for my son’s ssi check to be deposited into do I have to report that as income to ssi? Also should I reimburse myself for that 70.00? I am his representative payee and had to have a new account set up with the correct title. To open the new account, you have to put a certain amount of money in it.

    Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Shannon,

      If your son is a minor in your care, you do not have to report the deposit to his account as income because your income is already being considered in determining your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment. If he is an adult, you could treat the deposit as a formal loan and repay yourself the $70 after his SSI is starts. That way it would not impact his SSI.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  77. elisha cruz says:

    I HAVE TO RE CERTIFY FOR MY SONS SSI WHO IS 11 AND RECEIVES SSI DUE TO HIS MANY SURGERIES DUE TO A BIRTH DEFECT. I RECENTLY MOVED AND MY RENT WENT FROM 1000 TO 1650. I MAKE BETWEEN 2500 TO 4700 MONTH GROSS I HAVE 3 ADDITIONAL CHILDREN I CARE FOR. I HAVE TO PAY FOR CHILD CARE WHICH IS 200 WEEKLY. WILL MY INCOME INTERFERE WITH MY SONS SSI CHECK, WILL MY OTHER EXPENSES WILL WITH THE DETERMINATION OF HIS CHECKS

    THANK YOU

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Elisha,

      Your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) check is based on your income and the income of his father, if his father lives in the same household. Your household expenses do not determine the amount of the SSI payment. It sounds as if your income varies. It is important to report your earnings every month to avoid or at least minimize overpayments.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  78. J says:

    If a person receiving ssi wins the lottery, what happens to their benefits? Specifically a dollar amount that is equivelant to 2 years of what they are currently getting, but not nearly enough to live off of long-term. If they are no longer eligible, how likely are they to qualify again after the money is spent? Is someone with a well managed mental illness still considered disabled? By well managed I mean that the person still has “episodes” 2-3 times per year. Would they have to be experiencing one of these episodes to qualify when they reapply?
    I would also like to know if this person could receive a cash gift of $2000 if their current resources are $0 and remain eligible?
    Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear J.,

      If a person won the lottery in the amount of two years worth of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, the person could purchase a irrevocable life insurance policy (which doesn’t count toward the resource), a car (one vehicle is not countable) with the money and be ineligible for benefits only in the month in which the lottery payment was made and the following months until the money in excess of the resource limit was spent. If the period is less than a year a new application is not required to have benefits restarted. A cash give of $2,000 would count as income in the month received and would necessitate refunding SSI received for the month.

      Whether a person with a “well-managed mental illness” who has “episodesonly 2-3 times a year is still disabled depends on the severity of the episodes. If the episodes keep the individual off work so many days that an employer would not hold his job for him, then he might still be considered disabled.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  79. Wendy Rae says:

    Hello, i am on SSDI, so my question is more geared towards my Son’s SSI (for Autism).
    My Grandparents left me some money, i am going to put it into
    buying a House, ALL of if, now having an Inheritance wont effect me, but anything over 3000 ( combined income ) will jeopardize my Sons benefits.
    So my question is, when i get the inheritance, i plan to turn around and put it immediately into a home, it will be in my personal account for one day (or one week, it doesn’t matter) so i asked the SSA administration would he lose his SSI indefinitely? and they said only for the month (s) that i am over, and he wouldn’t have to re-apply as long as it was under one year since he got off.

    Now, it is not that i dont trust the SSA office, but my experience is, do not believe everything you are told the first time, so i am trying to reach out and see if this is correct.
    Once i buy the Home, i will be poor again, and since a house is not considered income (unless you are renting it out) i think my Son should continue receiving benefits.
    The Medical that come with it, and the Special Ed. it Vital.

    My Realtor said that the Executor of my Grandparents Estate could just wire the money straight to the tittle Company and it would never enter my personal account, but i dont like the way that feels,
    it feels weird and illegal.
    Anyway, we would only lose one month (i believe) of my Sons benefits, and i could live with that.

    Any thoughts?
    I do not wish to do something bad.

    Wendy.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Wendy,

      You got correct information from the Social Security Administration. Whether you receive the money directly or it is paid directly to the seller on your behalf, the inheritance will count as income in the month that it is received. And, yes, your son will not be eligible that month. If the inheritance comes through at the end of one month and the purchase of the house is completed (through escrow) in the same month, then your son will be eligible again the following month. If the house doesn’t close in the same month as you receive the inheritance, he could be ineligible the following month as well.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  80. Ann says:

    My daughter is collecting SSDI for herself and her 2 children. 1 of those children came to live with me last year. Shouldn’t he be getting his benefit from her? If so, how do I go about making sure he starts receiving it?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Candy,

      Yes, the grandchild who is living with you should receive his benefits. You can apply to the Social Security Administration to be his payee.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  81. Candy says:

    My daughter is collecting SSDI for herself and her 2 children. 1 of those children came to live with me last year. Shouldn’t he be getting his benefit from her? If so, how do I go about making sure he starts receiving it?

    Thanks!

  82. jessica pacunas says:

    hello my children receive ssi and the duplex that we were living in that we owned we now rent out for income for ourselves, and my husband purchased a house with his taxes that was big enough for all of us and we now live in the house he purchased, will there ssi be cut because we rent out that home for income or should I sell it?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jessica,

      The duplex in which you no longer live might be excluded from resources for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) because it is income-producing property. You need to report the move and the rental income immediately to get a ruling on the duplex and to get a recalculation for your child’s SSI now that you have rental income.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  83. Michelle says:

    I just receive a letter form ssi asking for my paystubs , bank statement and retirement fund . I’m a payee representive for my daughter that is 20 years old. MY income is 3059 a month and I borrowed money from my 401k which was 6000 would that affect my daughter ssi. I also want to know will my 401k have a affect on my daughter ssi benefit

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Nichole,

      A mistake may have been made in requesting your financial information. Your daughter is over age eighteen so your income and assets should not affect her Supplemental Security Income (SSI). However, if she has been newly approved for SSI and her claim goes back more than two years to when she was under age eighteen, you might need to submit financial information for the period she was a minor.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  84. Nicole says:

    I just receive a letter form ssi asking for my paystubs , bank statement and retirement fund . I’m a payee representive for my daughter that is 20 years old. MY income is 3059 a month and I borrowed money from my 401k which was 6000 would that affect my daughter ssi. I also want to know will my 401k have a affect on my daughter ssi benefit

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Nichole,

      A mistake may have been made in requesting your financial information. Your daughter is over age eighteen so your income and assets should not affect her Supplemental Security Income (SSI). However, if she has been newly approved for SSI and her claim goes back more than two years to when she was under age eighteen, you might need to submit financial information for the period she was a minor.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  85. Bae says:

    My son receives SSI benefits, I have applied for benefits based on a few conditions that have become debilitating now to me. I am awaiting a decision and I am scared that I or he will have an adverse decision. My question is, if I am approved for SSI because my credits ran out while taking care of my son, will he potentially lose his? He only receives $124 in SSI and because his father was determined to be disabled from the VA a year ago, he receives money based on his record. If I was to get approved, would this take his SSI money away? I don’t want to lose his benefit because his insurance is provided as long as he is still disabled and I can’t afford his medicines nor appointments otherwise.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Bae,

      If you are approved for Supplemental Security Income, your husband’s income will considered in determining both your and your son’s SSI payment amount. Whatever amount that is deemed (consdered) available for your and your son’s support will be split equally between the two of you in determining your SSI payment amounts; that is, you and your son will receive the same amount of SSI if your husband’s income is not too high.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  86. dawn says:

    My son recieves ssi, his primary address is with me and I am his payee. But during the school week he stays with my mom in another state because the schools here wont take him. He is here for weekends, school breaks and the summer and I have sole legal custody and primary placement. My mother has grandparents power of attorney for the school year. My question is for insurance, can she add him to her insurance for dr appoitments for when he is out of state?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dawn,

      Your question seems to refer to your mother, but you may mean your child’s mother. The child’s mother probably can add your son to her insurance and your mother probably cannot. Either way, whichever “she” you are referring to needs to check with her health insurance company to find out whether she can add your son to her health insurance.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  87. Teresa says:

    Dear Kay
    I have been separated from my husband since 2005, we are still legally married, but don’t not live in the same household. We have a 10 year old daughter that lives with me. I have been receiving SSI since 2006. Our Federal and State taxes are done through a tax preparer and they file a Joint return on us. The refund goes into my checking account and when I had a review this year, Social Security told me that even though I do not live with my husband he can not claim me on his taxes and receive money back on his taxes because I receive SSI which is on income need. I can’t find anything stating this, I find where it says they don’t count income tax refunds. IRS says that he can claim me even if we don’t live together, because we are still legally married. They have taken away my SSI benefits. Can you help me with this.
    Thanks Teresa

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Teresa,

      You should appeal the decision to terminate your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. Your husband’s income and assets do not affect your eligibility for SSI because he does not live with you. I am not an tax expert but I believe it is correct that he can file a joint return because you are still married; tax law has nothing to do with SSI law.

      The problem comes in when you had the tax refund deposited to your checking account. Because your husband’s income is not deemed to you for purposes of calculating your SSI benefit amount, the tax refund is income to you. It is not your income tax payment being refunded; it is his, so the tax refund exclusion may not apply. (Your SSI is non-taxable.)

      Depending on the amount of the refund you were either ineligible in the month that the tax refund was deposited into the account or eligible for less than you were paid. You do not say what you did with the money. If you gave the money to him (gave away a countable resource), you may not be eligible for SSI for the number of months you could have used the money to support yourself.

      All that said, if you received the money only as a convenience for him, you might be able, with a statement from your husband and proof the money went back to him, get an exception to its counting as income in the month received and a resource in months after that.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  88. frank says:

    I have 2 kids ages 3 and 5 who receive ssi payments. They both live with their mother. We are currently seperated and I moved to a different state. The local ss office lowered the amount that my kids receive because they say that I am still living in the same home as my kids, even though I have sent them proof that I am no longer there. My ex wife has gone numerous times and taken the proof, but for some reason the paperwork always gets lost.. I try and help with what I can, but I am just coming off of a work related injury, amd am trying to play catch up with all my bills. My ex wife is going to school full time while my kids are in school. She cannot work because our kids take up all of her time. Is there anything we can do to get the social security office to believe us?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Frank,

      I suggest that your wife go to a Social Security office with yet another statement from you about the date you separated and a copy of your rent receipt or other proof of residence and that she stay there until she sees a supervisor. She should be calm and polite and state the number of times the proofs have been submitted and the need to have the record corrected and payment started.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  89. J says:

    My son is ASD and receives SSI because I don’t make enough for a family of 5. Our house has been on the market for 3 years and I have a settlement next week. I am planning to call his case worker about the sale this week. How does it affect his disability benefits? I am using proceeds to purchase another house in a better school district. I am freaking out.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear J,

      Your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for the month that you get the money from the sale of house is not affected by the sale. If you purchase the new house in the same month, there will be no impact on your son’s benefits. However, if you do not, he will be ineligible for the following month and each month thereafter until the money is reinvested in the house. (This response is based on the assumption that you are getting more than $5,000 out of the sale of your house.)

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  90. Malika says:

    Hi I am payee for my 14 yrold old son my rent went up do I need to report that to social security

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Malika,

      If no one other than your children and your spouse, if you have one, live with you, you do not need to report the increase in rent to the Social Security Administration. If someone helps you pay the increased rent, you need to report that. If you are getting food stamps, report the increase to the food stamp office.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  91. Kris says:

    My son receives an SSI payment and I would like for him to go to North Carolina (we live in AZ) for the school year (only one) with his grandmother. (He is becoming a difficult child and beating on his sister and I think seperating them may help him some and my daughter). My mom asks me to pay rent and food for him if he is coming there on a monthly basis. How will this work since he will probably lose his SSI because their income exceeds the limit? He would leave the end of Aug and return in May. He is 13 yrs old. Help is greatly appreciated.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kris,

      You do need to report the move to the Social Security Administration, but your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is not affected by his grandparents’ income and resources. He does need to pay market rate for room and board or his share of food and shelter (rent or mortgage and utilities, excluding phone) while he is there in order to receive the maximum SSI. His share is one-half if there are two in the household; one third if there are three, etc. You should also be purchasing his clothing and paying for his other needs while away. It is okay to do this through his grandmother. You should get a receipt for the rent and board payments each month and also ask his grandmother to keep receipts for any clothing or personal supplies that are purchased with the SSI money so that you will have them when you have to account each year.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  92. Sandy says:

    I currently purchased a new home and I want to rent out my old one, but I’m receiving SSI benefits. Would rental income affect my benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sandy,

      You need to report immediately that you have purchased a new home. The home you used to live in is now a countable resource and probably makes you ineligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as long as it is not rented out. If you rent it out, the house may be considered income-producing property and not count as a resource. In that case, the rental income from it would count as income for SSI. Check with Social Security to see whether the countable income will be the gross rent payment or the rent payment reduced by taxes, insurance, mortgage,and repairs.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  93. Chris says:

    hello, my wife has a nephew who is 9 and is receiving ssi . his father passed and his mother is also on ssi and she cant take care of him and her self, so she wants my wife and I and our children to take him in as a guardian. will he lose all or any of his ssi ? nobody in my household is on ssi but my children are all minors.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Chris,

      Your family’s income and assets will not affect your nephew’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment. His mother should report the child’s move and you should go into Social Security to apply to be payee and to give information about your nephew’s new living arrangement. You do not say how many people are in your household, but if you use your nephew’s SSI to pay his share of food and shelter (rent, mortgage, and utilities, excluding phone), he will not have a reduction in benefits. His share is the total cost of shelter and food divided by the number of people in the household.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  94. Ashley says:

    I have question. My daughter is 3 and got approved for ssi. She was diagnosed with level2 autism. She was approved last Wednesday. I haven’t received any letters or anything from ssa . I called to check her status and they told me she was approved for ssi benefits. When will she start receiving payments? Is it a lengthy process to get your first payment? I applied for her May 6, 2014. So it only took them a little over a month to make the disability determination. Some say they make you wait 6 months after approved others say no. I’m lost!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ashley,

      Processing times vary greatly. If the claim is very clear cut and all the medical evidence is available, a quick decision is possible. You may need to give a financial update and provide bank information to get payment started. You can contact Social Security and request an appointment to do that.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  95. Ray price says:

    I apply for disability 10/3/2013. and I received $975 by March. and I received $808 may 1 and another $808 may 30..but I didn’t receive nothing for the month of june..I want to know why? and when am I going start getting regular payments? Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ray,

      I think that your May 30 payment was for June because June 1, the usual payment day, fell on a weekend.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  96. tiffany says:

    My daughter receives survivors benefits will it effect her benefits if I get married or if I change her last name?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tiffany,

      Your daughter’s survivor benefits will not be affected by your marriage. Changing the child’s last name probably would not affect eligibility, but I would discuss the matter with Social Security before proceeding.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  97. Judy Hunt says:

    My husband has disability from SSI. My son took co-op his senior year where he worked half a day and got credit for it at school. Of course he made a small income as well. We just got a thing in the mail asking him to pay money back in since he turned 18. But they seem to be going on the whole year and not just the months after he turned 18. Is this correct? Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Judy,

      I assume that your husband is receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI) and that your son was receiving Social Security dependents benefits. My response is based on that assumption. There is an earnings limit to receive dependents benefits and a reduction of one dollar for every two earned over that limit. He may have exceeded that limit. Ask a Social Security representative to show you a calculation of the overpayment.

      There is one other thing to consider. If you son was still in high school student after he turned eighteen and was taking enough hours including the work credit, he was eligible for benefits until he graduated. If you have not presented proof of school attendance after age eighteen and do so, the overpayment might be reduced.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  98. Joan says:

    My 26 yr old dtr is on SSI. She works part-time. There is a very good chance that she will marry a non SSI/SSDI person. She rents the condo that she lives in and has a car payment.

    He has a very old car and if they get married would rent out his house worth approximately 70k as his only income as he will be going to school full time. How does this affect dtrs SSI…will she loose because of house or will they just add his income of approx. 850.00 rental to hers?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Joan,

      If your daughter marries, her financial eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will be reevaluated considering both her and her husband’s income and assets. There is a $3,000 countable asset limitation. If they live in the house, the house will not be a countable asset. If they rent it out, it might be excluded as an income-producing resource. The income that will be counted will be the gross rent reduced by mortgage, taxes, property insurance, repairs, etc. A certain amount of the rental income will be excluded for her husband’s support. Any excess will be added to the countable portion of your daughter’s earned income. With regard to resources, note that the second car will count toward the $3,000 limit.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  99. Renee says:

    My 13 year old daughter (who currently lives with her grandmother in Ohio) receives SSI as well as her grandmother, she has come to visit me and has informed me she only get’s 20 a month out of her check for cloth’s and personal needs. The rest is used with her grandmothers for rent and so on! Her Aunt and her boyfriend live there as well her Aunt gets payed to take care of her grandmother! Can they use all her check except 20 to pay the bills with the others there or should I report this? I know social security allowed a car to be bought from her dedicated account years back (do to her heath) for doctors appointments it was in a wreck and she informed me they received 2000 for the car wouldn’t that be my daughters 2000 if they were informed the car would be hers when she was old enough… I greatly appreciate your help! They have told her I cant do nothing but I still have my parental rights, at the time I allowed her to stay with her grandmother because my daughter wanted to but if my daughters money isn’t being used for her I’m not happy about it and will handle that in court if I have to take custody back to make sure she has what she need but don’t know if what they are doing is against SS policy! I know that you can use it for shelter but her whole check shouldn’t the 2 other adults pay not just her grandmom and then all her check for all bills in the home?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Renee,

      It would be appropriate for your daughter’s grandmother to use your daughter benefits to pay one-quarter of the rent, utilities (excluding phone), and food. Perhaps you could talk with your daughter’s grandmother to see what percentage she is contributing. You might also talk with your daughter and find out whether her grandmother is also purchasing her cell phone service, a bus pass, paying medical co-pays, haircuts, etc. that your daughter is not thinking about to help determine whether money is being misused. If you think it is, you can talk with Social Security about it.

      It may be that the cash from the sale of the car that was purchased with money from your daughter’s dedicated account has to be spent for a replacement car or redeposited to the dedicated account. I suggest checking with Social Security regarding the rules on this.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Renee says:

        TY for responding my daughter is here with me for summer vacation and we have talked I have been told she gets 20 and thats it the rest her grandmother told me goes on bills and they did not get a new bar my daughter doesn’t know were the money from the care went… she doesn’t have cell phone or anything else. I believe that they are using her check to pay everything for all of them her and her grandmom’s check.her aunt get5s paid to take care of her grandmother but pays her car payment and stuff for her but not the bills and her old man is not working. And from what my daughter says her aunt forges the paper when her mom wont sign who would I report that to? I find it is un fair my daughter has not had a hair cut in 2 years and only gets 20 out of her money for personal stuff and cloths so from what you have told me already I believe I should report this would you agree I should she only has about 20 out fits last time she got new cloths was Christmas. And the 2000 was not deposited they used it my daughter is not sure on what but it wasn’t a new car
        TY again for your time and responses! You are a big help Kay!

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Renee,

          You are welcome and, yes, it sounds as if you should report the situation to Social Security.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  100. Dominique says:

    Hi I have two kids who receives SSI benfits of 721 a month each. We stay in the state of Florida we are a family of 5 and we are relocating to another county. Will,the SSI PAYMENTS DROP DUE TO THE MOVE. I was told by a friend it would do to cost of living

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dominique,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is payable only to residents of the fifty U.S. states and the North Mariana Islands. The last month payable will be the last month your children are in the United States. You must report your move before you leave the U.S.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Dominique says:

        I’m sorry I was trying to say we stay in the state of Florida. We are moving to another county within the same state. I was told that my ssi benefit would change due to the cost of living. Is that true thx

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Dominique,

          My apologies, I misread “county” as “country.” SSI payment amounts do not change from county to county within the same states.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  101. Holly says:

    My 12yr old son receives SSI and I am his payee. I currently live with my father rent free and am unemployed. If my son and I move in with my boyfriend will his income effect my sons SSI?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Holly,

      As long as your son pays his share of housing (rent or mortgage and utilities, excluding phone) and his share of food, his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits will not be affected by the move. His share is the total cost for housing and food divided by the number of people in the household. Your boyfriend’s income will not affect your son’s SSI benefits as long as you are not married.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  102. Vanesa Corral says:

    My daughter receives Ssi, I am her mother & the payee. This is her first year receiving benefits. They sent a questionere reporting for her 1st year. One question is how much I have saved for her, will they stop her benefits if no money has been saved?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Vanessa,

      Your daughter’s benefits will not stop because you have not saved any of the benefits. The benefits are to be used for her current needs first, before saving.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  103. Vanesa Corral says:

    Thank you!!

  104. Karen says:

    My 29 year old disabled son recieves benefits and lives in a facility. All his earnings are reported as required. We were recently advised that a monetary gift, ie: $40 for his birthday must also be reported, is this true?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Karen,

      All income is supposed to be reported to Social Security so that they can make a determination of whether it is countable income that affects Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment. However, a $40 one-time gift should be excluded (not count) if it meets the following guidelines as published on the Social Security website (www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/ssir/SSI10/Glossary.html)

      “Infrequent or Irregular Income
      “Income that is received either infrequently or irregularly that can be excluded from the determination of an individual’s income. “Infrequent” means that it is not received more than once in a calendar quarter from a single source and is not also received in the month immediately preceding or the month immediately following the month of receipt, regardless of whether or not these payments occur in different calendar quarters. “Irregular” means that an individual could not reasonably expect to receive the income. In any given quarter up to $30 of earned and $60 of unearned infrequent or irregular income is excluded.”

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  105. Jesse says:

    i plan on haveing my name changed to Rebecca Michelle i was born a male but plan on going threw srs do i have to report a name change and will me being transgender hurt my disability or ssi?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jesse,

      You are required to report your name change to the Social Security Administration with a copy of the court order for the name change. You may not have to give the reason. If asked, you can start out with “for personal reasons.” If in the future your claim is reviewed to see if you are still disabled, the gender change might become apparent in the review; however, being transgender should now affect your eligibility for benefits.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  106. Worried Mother says:

    Hello Kay- My son receives SSI and I allowed my ex husband to claim him as a dependent.He pays for child support for him and his siblings.I’m a full time student and did not work last year.Now SSI wants to know why my ex husband claimed him. I thought he was able to do so because he provides half of his support.Was this wrong?? Will they stop his benefits? I’m soo worried.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Worried Mother,

      The Social Security Administration (SSA) is checking to see if your son is getting more support from his father than the amount of his child support. If you have not already reported the child support to SSA, you need to do so promptly.

      There are specific tax laws regarding who can claim a child as a dependent on a tax return. You and your ex-husband need to check with the IRS to see whether your ex-husband can legally claim him.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  107. Karen Sanders says:

    My 11 year old son receives $721 a month in SSI benefits due to his autism. I usually get a large tax refund in February after filing taxes and am wondering what I will need to do as far as reporting this or if it needs to be reported. Also, do I need to inform my SNAP office of the recent approval off SSI for my son and will this affect my ability to get SNAP benefits any longer?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Karen,

      You do not have to report your tax refund to Social Security. You are required to report your son’s SSI award to the SNAP (food stamp) office. SSI benefits are considered in determining SNAP eligibility, so the SNAP grant may go down.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  108. hello123 says:

    i am representative payee for my son who gets ssi. i recently got called in for redetermination appointment because of irs. now they want to see my taxes for past three years. Which i claimed married filing jointly with my boyfriend who does not live with me.(we are not married) will this affect my sons ssi?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Hello 123,

      I am not a tax expert, but I believe you have broken the law (tax fraud) by filing a joint return when you were not married. With regard to your son’s Supplemental Security Income, you need to prove to Social Security that your boyfriend is not your child’s father or, if he is, that he has not lived with your son while your son has been getting SSI. If your boyfriend has lived with his son, you will need to provide proof of his income and assets so your son’s SSI benefits can be recalculated.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  109. Laurel says:

    My 21yo dgtr is receiving SSI. Can I pay for her to have a monthly cellphone without it affecting her benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Laurel,

      If you pay for the phone directly to the cell phone company, your gift of a phone will not affect your daughter’s SSI payments because a phone provides neither shelter or food.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  110. Thankful says:

    Hi Kay,
    Before I get to my question I want to say I think it is wonderful the service you provide here answering all these questions. Thank you!

    I know that as an SSI recipient I am not allowed to live outside of the US for more than 30 days but what if I am also a citizen of the country I am residing in? I have dual citizenship? Same rules?

    Thanks again!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Thankful,

      Yes, regardless of citizenship, the same rules apply to absence from the U.S. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is not payable to individuals living outside of fifty U.S. states or U.S. North Mariana Islands for more than thirty days or a full calendar month.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  111. dorothy says:

    Hi I have a few questions. I wanted to ask for when I call social security about my changes. For number and address and my rent in housing of 75 a month and about 115-200 for electric and water 45. I get 721. Will it go down ? Is there I way I could receive more to help more with my 2 year old no way she could get it if I get ssi? If I try I wont lose my ssi right?.. my ssi goes to rent and bills and her needs and food. Dont get much in stamps

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dorothy,

      You are receiving the maximum Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If will not go down as long as you are paying all your own shelter and food costs. The SSI program does not pay dependent benefits. If your child is eligible for assistance from the state you live in, it will not affect the amount of your SSI.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  112. Dalit says:

    My mother in law is getting ssi. She has
    Own house in India. She is USA citizen .can she still eligible for sis in California?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dalit,

      Your mother must report ownership of the house in India. The value of the house will be considered in determining whether her resources (assets) are within the resource limit for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  113. takeisha hayes says:

    Hi,
    My brother is a father and he has been approved for his benefits. What I would like to know is if they will send a letter to his child’s mother notifying her of his approval status? He has a delicate situation going on and we would like to know if she would be notified.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Takeisha,

      If your brother listed his child on his Social Security application, they will ask him who has custody and will contact the mother if they have the information to do so. If you think this did not occur and want to make sure that the child receives benefits, your brother can give the child’s mother his Social Security claim number so she can initiate the application for the child. Payment of dependent benefits will not reduce your brother’s benefit.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  114. Pamela Smith says:

    Good Evening,

    I have a son that is autistic and was approved for SSI a year ago. The time during the application I was the only working in the household, my spouse was not. We separated last year. I didnt think about notifying SSI about his leaving because he wasn’t working and I totally forgot that I placed his name on the original application. Just this January 2014, I received a letter stating that my sons SSI was being stopped due to increase in household income. When I read the letter it had my separated husbands name and mine attached with income that he is receiving from VA disability. I never received any of that income nor it was ever spent on the household. I did appeal with the proper forms but they continued to say denied. I am new at this whole SSI process. My question is what do I need to do to prove to them that I have never received any of my ex disability income? He filed that in his own. I am more frustrated because I do not know what to do. I would greatly be appreciative with any feedback or instructions given.

    Thank you in Advance,

    Pam

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Pamela,

      You need to appeal again after you have gathered documents that prove the date you and your husband separated and that show the VA benefits did not begin until after the separation. The former could be separate rent receipts and/or utility bills for two different addresses. The latter would be the VA award letter. Be sure to appeal within the required sixty days. If your husband is also eligible for Social Security Disability, you need to apply for dependent benefits for your son on his father’s record.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  115. Shell says:

    Hi,
    My son has Down Syndrome and he gets SSI income because I don’t make enough money. He is 17 and we just had a review and this was done over the phone. Couple days later my son and I revived paper called the privacy act statement collection and use of personal information (SSA-8510). The worker wrote that they are conducting a survey and we need this form for you & son to sign. My question is do I have to sign it if it’s for a survey? And my son can not read and write there for he is in capable to sign it. I have never recived one of these papers before and why would I get one now? And what survey are they doing? I didn’t get any other papers asking questions or explaining what it was about.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Shell,

      If the consent is for a survey and not to determine eligibility, you are not obliged to sign it or participate in the survey.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  116. thomas thurman says:

    My friend has ssi and a church gave her a check of $100.00 will it effect her benefits or not?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Thomas,

      Your friend needs to report the gift. It will cause her Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to be reduced for one month. Irregular or infrequent income that exceeds $60 in a single calendar quarter is not excluded income.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  117. fransisca says:

    My husband receives ssi and his father is his payee we lie together and pay bills together. My question is my husband decided to move out and break his responsibility of his portion of the rent/bills can ssi force him to use his ssi to help with bills?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Fransisca,

      Your husband’s disability benefits are for his support wherever he lives, so, no, the Social Security Administration (SSA) cannot force him to pay someone else’s bills. If he is receiving benefits as payee for a child that remains with you, you can apply to SSA to have the child’s benefits come to you so you can use the money to support that child.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  118. Christine says:

    My boyfriend receives $480 a month in SSI benefits. We live together and have two children together. They are aware of our living arrangement and I am his payee. A few months ago he gained custody of his son from a previous marriage. The reason his benefits are so low is because I pay for most of the bills. My question is, since he is solely responsible for his son, should he be receiving more in SSI benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Christine,

      The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program does not provide benefits for dependents.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  119. Shannon says:

    I am my sons representative payee and trustee and conservator.
    He draws ssi based on his disability and he also has a special needs trust. I am confused as to what I am allowed to spend the ssi money on? Does it have to be only food and shelter since he has a special needs trust? Am I not allowed to pay copays, haircuts and things of that nature with the ssi money since he has a special needs trust?

    Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Shannon,

      Please clarify “special needs trust.” Are you referring to a trust set up for your son that is unrelated to Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or are you referring to a Dedicated Account that SSI law requires for SSI back pay paid to a minor?

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Shannon says:

        It is not a dedicated account. He is 21. It was set up when he turned 18 because he started receiving annuity payments that had been put in a trust for him since he was five. When he got injured at age five the man that hit him, his insurance company paid us a settlement and we put it in a trust fund til he turned 18. Then he was to start drawing so much a month for 4 years at that point it would all be drew out. We had our lawyer draw up a supplemental/special needs trust for these monthly payments to be directly deposited into so he would still qualify for ssi. It is a Medicaid payback trust. It is title The {my sons name} special needs trust.

        • Shannon says:

          It is a trust that you the payments are put into because it is more than 2000.00 and it would knock him out of ssi benefits. Going into this trust, ssi can not count it as an asset or income.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Shannon,

          Trusts are complicated and can be written in many ways, so I will not comment on the use of the funds from the trusts any more than to say that they must be reported to the Social Security Administration (SSA)so that SSA can confirm that the trusts do not count as resources. (Usually, payments (disbursements) from trusts that aren’t countable are countable income. If you have not reported the payments, you need to now.) If your son had a “dedicated account” funded by SSI back pa,y those funds can be used only for very limited purposes such as medical needs and vocational rehabilitation. Your son’s monthly SSI payments can be used for any of his needs. Food, shelter, medical care, clothing, personal care, education, entertainment, etc.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

          • Shannon says:

            He does not have a dedicated account. He just started drawing ssi in February of this year. They know about the trust and it has already been excluded as a resource. This trust it to be used as a “supplemental” trust for thing to make his life as normal and to do things he would not other wise get to do. What I am worried about is spending the ssi money on entertainment, personal care, vacation, etc. if there is any left over after all basic needs are taken care of instead of spending the money in the trust. This is a Medicaid payback trust. Like if he wanted to get internet service or dish network, is it ok to pay for them with ssi money rather than using the trust money since the internet and dish network are not basic needs?

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Shannon,

            As long as his basic needs are met, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) law allows the use of SSI funds for entertainment and other non-essentials. I cannot advise you about the trust account. I suggest that you get legal advice to find out whether the trust is affected by using other money to pay for things that the trust is supposed to cover.

            Sincerely,

            Kay

  120. Shannon says:

    Part 2 of my above post…I guess what I am confused about is can ssi money be used to pay for things that can be paid for by the special needs trust? Does SSI expect me to pay for those items such as gas, entertainment etc out the special needs trust even if I have ssi money left over after his basic needs are met?

  121. Gabe says:

    Hello, I receiving $750 for SSI, I have a 4 year old and my Fiancé is expecting my 2nd child. She works at Burger King as a manager makes $850-to-$1000 depending on month. We would like to get married sometime this year. We have talked about the risk of Me losing my SSI. Would her income be deemed as my income if we have 2 kids? Would it not go towards the children? Will they take my SSI away if we get married?? Thank you for your time,
    Gabe

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Gabe,

      If you get married, some of your wife’s income will be allocated for the support of the two children and for her own support before any is deemed as countable income for you. At the rate she is currently earning, her earnings would have little or no affect on your Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Gabe says:

        Thank you Kay for the quick response, I’m also wondering if she starts recieving $1400 a month (due to her becoming a manager) will the raise be affecting my SSI income?.. What is the max we can both make before it affects my SSI with our 2 children living with Us if we get married?.. We both are just seeing our options. Thank you for your time.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Gabe,

          You can calculate your benefit considering your future wife’s potential salary of $1,400 by following the calculation example for income deemed from a spouse posted on this website, Disability Advisor. Go to http://www.disabilityadvisor.com/qualifying-for-ssi-disability/ to find the article and sample calculation. Alternatively, you can ask Social Security to calculate an amount for you.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  122. Lilliana says:

    My son receives 480$ of ssi disability they send a letter letting me know that he was gonna start receiving 721$ a month. the problem is that my son wasnt receiving child support ut the prolem that we had with child support is fixed and they are sending me the checks that they owe. I reported it but now i don’t know what’s gonna happend, are they gonna stop sending my son ssi or what?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lilliana,

      Your son’s child support will reduce his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment. If the child support is over $741 monthly, SSI will stop completely. If it varies from month to month, you must report the changes.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  123. sonya says:

    I have two.children who receives ssi.. I had an overpayment…for the amount
    Of $500.. Why does ssa make me pay back $500 out of both.checks for a toal of $1000 rather.than $250 out of each check for the total.overpayment of $500.. So basically they are getting paid back $500.more than they should..is that legal???

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sonya,

      Your children were probably overpaid the same amount each. You should have gotten two separate overpayment letters that state the amount each child was overpaid. If you have the letters, check them to see if the letters both say $500. If they do, then each child was overpaid $500. If the letters each ay $250, then take a copy of the letters to the Social Security Administration to get the collection corrected.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  124. Karen says:

    I went over resources by being on my grown childrens and separated husbands bank acts. I am representative payee for my child. I filed a waiver and it has been 6 months and still no decision. I called they say sometimes it takes forever but that they are monitoring me? What does that even mean? Not sure what to do. They already stopped her benefits so we are not continuing to get them.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Karen,

      If your child is not receiving benefits because family resources are still too high, then maybe your don’t need to worry about how long your request for waiver of repayment is taking because they are not collecting the overpayment right now. If, on the other hand, the child is eligible but benefits are being withheld to collect the overpayment, you can request only partial withholding while the request for waiver is pending.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Karen says:

        I took my names off the accounts. I am just curious why it is taking so long? They asked me to send in copies of her IEP, my tax forms, and my property tax bills for the last 2 years. When I called the toll free number one representative said they were monitoring something etc.? I called back because I got disconnected and the next representative had no idea what she was talking about. I mean how long does it take for them to decide a waiver? I tried to request a partial withholding and they told me I had to of done that within 10 days and I did not. I just don’t like the fact of this over my head I would like it resolved and don’t know what is taking so long and I get no answers. Why would they want all that information anyways again? Thanks for your reply:)

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Karen,

          I am not sure you are getting correct information. To stop withholding during an appeal of the fact of an overpayment, you must request continuation of benefits within ten days. I am not sure that that time frame when you agree with the overpayment but have requested a waiver. Also, if you submitted everything once before, you shouldn’t have to submit the same things again unless they have been lost. I suggest that you go to your local office and ask to speak to an SSI claims representative (not a service representative) to make a written request for partial withholding and to request that the local office send a follow-up inquiry to the office that decides whether the waiver will be granted. To be eligible for waiver you must both be unable to repay (financial hardship) and not be at fault in causing the overpayment (reported everything on time).

          Sincerely,

          Kay

          • Karen says:

            The local office is over an hour away so that isn’t going to happen. They told me I could not make a request now because it should have been done within 10 days of the notice and it wasn’t. I am sure they will not grant it as I was on many acts with my grown children and did not realize that it would be considered my resource. Any idea though why it takes so long for a waiver answer? And again what did the rep mean by monitoring me? I have submitted things both by fax and mail. Its very frustrating!

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Karen,

            The representative may have meant that the local office is checking on your request for waiver from time to time. I would say that a decision has not yet been made because they have not yet gotten around to looking at the request. There are backlogs in pretty much every Social Security department.

            Sincerely,

            Kay

          • Karen says:

            Is it typical they would ask for my childs school records and property tax forms etc? For a waiver? It almost sounds like their trying to make a decision on the waiver and re-qualify her?

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Karen,

            You are right that the requests do seem to be addressing both medical eligibility and financial issues.

            Sincerely,

            Kay

          • Karen says:

            So what would you suggest…just wait it out? I live too far away to go in and who actually makes the decision on an overpayment of $20,000? Is it the local office? I send letters periodically and get nothing back and I call the 1-800 number and they say they send them correspondence to let me know the status but that hasn’t happened either. Just want it resolved thats all! What do you suggest or make of any of it? Thanks so much..

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Karen,

            The local office does not make waiver decisions. They are made in the central payment center. All the local office can do is send inquiry letters to the payment center. They really can’t speed anything up.

            Sincerely,

            Kay

  125. sybil says:

    Hi,

    I am a rep payee for my child which is 11months old. We dont have a car here in chicago, we always take the cab and its very expensive. I was planning to use her money to get a car cause she has a lot of doctors appoinment every month. My question is can I be able to make a downpayment using her money and pay for the installment everymonth?..

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sybil,

      Given that the car is primarily to provide transportation for your child’s medical care, the use of her benefits for the car seems reasonable. You could put the car in both your and the child’s names to make it clear that you are not misusing her funds.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • sybil says:

        Thank you for clearing my mind about using the part of her money for a car. It’s very helpful. If you mind can i ask you another question?..my child receive her first check this month which is $1754.thats for 4months coz she was enrolled last april and my husband told me that since we pay for her previous needs such as hospital transportion and therapies for month of april, may and june that we can use the money that is suppose to be for her during that previous months. And we are not liable to reason or justify the expenses that are already made last april may and june. I am afraid to get it coz i know i will be the one to justify the expenses made. My question is…is my husband have a point or can we use the money that is suppose to be use by my child during the last 3months or I still have to use it for her benefits and document it?..or can I reimburse the money we used for her past transpo and needs the previous 3months but i dont have the receipt anymore..(hope your not confuse). Thank you so much kay!

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Sybil,

          It seems reasonable to get a printout from the medical providers who provided services during those three months and reimburse yourselves for those expenses. The rest could be saved for future medical expenses which could come up for your daughter, which might exceed what could be covered with her monthly checks.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  126. Adrian says:

    My sister has been receiving SSI benefits for she and my niece since her husband dies about 10 years ago. She moved back in with my parents and has been living there for 10 years. My mother passed away recently and I discovered that she was supposed to be helping them out with $500/month for rent and utilities but rarely paid it. I suspect she still claimed that on the monthly report. She never paid for rent, utilities, food, or any other essentials. She has bought a TON of video games and DVDs though!

    Now she has moved to Florida but can’t afford a two bedroom. When I told her to get a 1-bedroom apt, she said that SSI requires her to have a separate bedroom for her daughter.

    a. Has she committed fraud for claiming $500 for rent and utilities when she in fact rarely paid that.
    b. Must she rent a two bedroom?

    Thanks!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Adrian,

      If your sister and niece have been getting Supplemental Security Income (SSI) because both are disabled, then it would be fraudulent to report paying rent when not doing so. On the other hand, if she and your niece have been receiving survivor benefits on your brother-in-law’s Social Security earnings record, their benefits are not related to whether or not they pay rent.

      Neither Social Security or Supplemental Security Income law requires a two bedroom apartment. Perhaps she is getting assistance from another source that has that requirement.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  127. Ritta V says:

    Hello kay,
    Im 22 and get ssi $721 n have a 3 year old. single. but i plan to get married soon will that affect me in anyway?
    Another question:
    The men im gonna be marrying is currently paying child suporrt for his other 3 kids he has will that affect me reciveing my mnth payment since im not working but will start classes in August.
    Help please!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ritta,

      When you get married, your husband’s income will be considered in determining your eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). In deciding how much if any of his income will affect your earnings, Social Security will first allot month for your husband’s support and the support of your child and the children for whom he is paying child support. Depending on how much he is earning, his earnings may not affect your benefit. You can take the actual figures (gross earnings and child support payments) to Social Security and ask them to give you an estimate.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  128. Linda Bucheit says:

    I take care of my 30 year old daughter wjho gets SSI I am her payee we will be moving to Texas soon and renting a room paying part of all the expenses and all her own food there is 1 other person in the house will it effect her SSI by sharing with this person

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Linda,

      As long as she is paying at least half of the shelter expenses, her SSI will not be affected. You do need to report the change in her living arrangements to the Social Security Administration.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  129. Linda Bucheit says:

    I have a 30 year old daughter on SSI i am her payee I have always been her payee I will be moving to texas with her and renting a room and paying rent and sharing the utility bills and paying for our own food will this effect her SSI and there is one checking account I have a very small pension that goes into checking

  130. radost says:

    i’m 66 years old. married. we have no income. i recive 744 per month SSI because of my age. we have no other pension, SSD etc.
    I have recently recived a check from my last employer (my employment was termonated over a year ago). the check is for 4886 from a profit sharing plan. accrding to the employer the deducted 20% tax and the 4886 is after tax. how will this affect my ssi payment? do i need to report it to SSI and then file taxes? thank you very much!!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Radost,

      You must report the profit sharing check to Social Security. You will not be eligible for SSI in the month you received it. You will have to repay the money you got for that month. You will also be ineligible for any month thereafter that your assets are $2,000 or more. You may use the money to repay the overpayment for things that you need. Once you have spent down to below $2,000, your SSI can start again.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • radost says:

        Thank you very much Kay! I really appreciate it. I owe my son $3700 that i borrowed after i lost my job but before i turned 65 and stated receiving SSI by age. I promised my son to return the loan when i receive this check from the profit sharing plan. Can I use that money to repay the loan and if so will it affect my SSI payments and how would i report it to SSI?
        if i can repay him with that money, should i deposit in my account and write him a check or can i just give him the check and he will give me cash for the difference?
        Thank you so very much for your kind assistance!!!

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Radost,

          Valid use of some of the profit-sharing funds should include repaying a debt. You and your son will have to submit statements to the Social Security Administration about the amount of money he lent you and that the money you received was definitely a loan and that at the time of the loan there was an agreement of how you were going to repay (from the profit sharing when it was paid out.) I recommend depositing the check and writing a check to your son because it creates a clear record of the transactions. Also, some banks don’t accept third-party checks.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

      • radost says:

        Thank you very Kay! I really appreciate the advice. To follow-up, I was planning to return a loan for money I owe to my son. He gave me $3700 after I lost my job and was waiting to turn 65 and for SSI to start. I knew I will receive the money from the profit sharing plan and wanted to use it to repay the loan.
        1) Can I use it to repay the loan?
        2) If yes, should I deposit the check on my account and write my son a check for 3700?
        3) Maybe I can just give him the original check for 4886 and he gives me the change cash?
        4) How do I report that to SSI? Thank you so much!! You are the best!

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Radost,

          Please see my response of a few minutes ago, which answers questions one through three. To answer question four, make a photocopy of the check before you cash it. Take the following to your local Social Security office: the check copy and any correspondence you have about the profit sharing payment and the statements by you and your son that I reference in my previous response. Say that you need to report a change in income and disposition of resources and would like to see a claims representative to make the report.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  131. Stanley says:

    I receive disability and I take care of my daughter. She doesn’t have a disability. Can I receive more money to take care of my daughter and I? If so what do I need to do?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Stanley,

      You do not say whether you are receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security disability (SSDI). SSI does not pay dependents benefits. SSDI benefits can be accompanied by dependent benefits depending on the disabled person’s family maximum benefit. If you are receiving SSDI, an application should have been taken for your daughter at the time you were approved. If you get SSDI, I suggest that you contact Social Security to find out whether your family maximum is more than you are getting for yourself. If it is, you can file an application for your daughter.

      If your daughter is eligible for Social Security dependent benefits, contact your state’s health and human services department to see whether you might be eligible for some assistance to help support her.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  132. lisa says:

    Hi,
    My son is 22 and I am just applying for SSI because of major mental health issues for him. I met with the county today to discuss and they got me working on things. My question is this: If my son does receive benefit, we will be collecting rent from him each month. Does that rental money collected from my son require me to include it as income on my tax return? (i.e, is that considered income to me and therefore I must file taxes on it? or is it considered “difficulty of care payments” and is exempt from my needing to claim as income?
    Thank you in advance.
    Lisa

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lisa,

      Your question is a tax question. I suggest that you contact the IRS or a tax accountant for guidance.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  133. Susan says:

    Hi! My question is this, when does social security no longer count the parents income for a child with a disability? Right now we are not eligible because we make too much money. My child is definitely eligible..has been in the past and received benefits but we are now over income. When do they stop counting our income?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Susan,

      Your income will no longer be considered in determining your child’s eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) when he or she turns eighteen. About four months before his or her eighteenth birthday, you can file an application for a medical decision based on the disability criteria for an adult. That will allow some time for processing. Benefits will begin the month after the child’s eighteenth birthday unless the birthday is the first of the month, in which case benefits will start with the birthday month.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  134. Kelly says:

    We have a child who was getting ssi benefits. Recently found out we were way over resources so they stopped her benefits. I just recently got paper work saying she was over paid by $18,900! Is it worth asking a waiver for if we were definitely over resources? What else can they do if we can’t pay it back? Thanks for your time
    Kelly

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kelly,

      To be eligible for a waiver, you have to be without fault in causing the overpayment and also be unable to pay it. That said, it can’t hurt for apply for the waiver. One alternative would be to pay back enough to put you below the resource limit again and then ask for a waiver for the remainder and suspension of collection until the waiver decision is made. At the same time, ask for collection of the remainder as partial withholding of SSI benefits if the waiver is denied. Keep a copy of all the requests submitted. And, to get suspension of collection, you need to make the request within ten days of receiving the overpayment notice.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Kelly says:

        If they deny the waiver and we don’t pay it back what will they do? The money that caused us to be over resource is not even ours, we were holding it for our son! Who does not live here and is over 25…just curious. They have suspended benefits now for over 6 months, waiting for a decision on a waiver actually. They must be backed up or something?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Kelly,

          Social Security overpayments never go off the books unless collection is waived. A Social Security overpayment can be collected from retirement benefits years later. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is not paid from the Social Security trust fund, so collection laws are different. I do not know whether tax refunds could be withheld or other collection actions taken. I suggest that if the waiver is denied, you discuss this with the Social Security Administration.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  135. Fred says:

    I am disabled and receive SSI money. I have moved and a friend has moved in with me. I am not married. My friend is not working and receives no income at all. I am paying all living expenses. Do I need to report her moving in with me?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Fred,

      You do need to report your friend’s moving in with you even though she is not paying any of the expenses. If she starts to contribute to rent, utilities or food at a later time, you should report that also.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  136. crystal branton-espada says:

    Hi im having trouble understanding how social security counts my husbands income and we have been separated almost 2 years now hes military and he is not the biligolical of my children who are receiving ssi can he lives in hawaii can u tell me what I need to do

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Crystal,

      If your husband is not living in the same household with the children, his income should not count to reduce your children’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI). You need to submit a statement from your husband giving the date that he moved out. You also need to gather as much proof as you can of when he moved out, such as rent receipts or mortgage records for all the addresses he has lived at since he moved out. Once you have proved the date he moved out, your children’s SSI can be recalculated to determine whether they were eligible for more than they received since their stepfather moved out.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  137. Mica says:

    Hello! I have a question. I got married a couple days ago and am trying to report the current change to my local ssi office but they’ve been overloaded. My question is..will my ssi amount change if my husband is unemployed, a student, and a disabled veteran? I am not getting the full amount of ssi. Thanks so much!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mica,

      If your husband has income, his income may affect the amount your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  138. Lauren Savina says:

    I have received SSI benefits since 18 y/o due to a mental illness that prevented me from working. If I get a job in another state am I authorized to move? If so, what steps do I need to take to update my information if I move before I have the available information about the job? (i.e.- income, hours, info they only give upon signing a contract, sometimes)

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lauren,

      You are free to move from state to state. As soon as you move, contact the Social Security Administration to provide information about your new living arrangement and as much information as you have at the time about your new job. Then as soon as you have information about your pay rate and hours, report that promptly. Be aware that, depending on how much you are earning, you may have to repay part or all of the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for months in which you receive work earnings.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  139. Justin says:

    I have 2 questions,and My Brother(43) and I(39) are both on SSDI,SSI AND WI-SSI. 1. Well my brother just passed away(on Monday 7/21),and I was told my payments may change not sure if it goes down or up. So will they payments change??? And 2. My Brother has a Death Insurance(I think that’s what it called) for his funeral exspenses. In his will he has me and my sister as the beneficiaries for what ever moneys left over. But also,now my sister(44 w/passed) died before my brother,and he didn’t change it yet,before he passed. Any info is appreciated……….

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Justin,

      It sounds as if you and your brother were receiving disabled adult child Social Security benefits on a parent’s earnings record. If that is true then your Social Security could go up because your brother’s benefits have stopped.

      Your inheritance will count as income for your federal and state Supplemental Security Income (SSI) in the month it is received. If on the first of the following month you have countable assets over $2,000, you will not be eligible again until your assets drop below the $2,000 limit. As far as the insurance beneficiaries go, you can check the provisions of the policy or with the insurance company to see if your sister’s share goes to you or to her heirs.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • justin says:

        Hi again Kay, Well I am getting all disabled adult child Social Security benefits on my Dads earning record. With that I am not longer getting federal and state Supplemental Security Income(SSI). So my questions now are A. will I beable to keep Medicaid and Medicare(primary)??? and B, I am about to get a inheritance from my brother of about 10k, what do I need to do to keep(or spend it) the money, yet will beable I keep getting my disabled adult child Social Security benefits on my dads earnings record???

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Justin,

          You will keep your Medicaid entitlement. You may have to reapply for Medicaid to see if your income is low enough to qualify for the Medicaid program. Your inheritance will not affect your Disabled Adult Child benefits and does not have to be reported to Social Security. If you remain eligible for Medicaid, you must report the income to the Medicaid office.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  140. Jessica says:

    Hello,

    I am my minor sons payee for SSI, i have the DirectExpress Card and get the full 721 on it every month. If my son goes and lives with his father for a year and then comes back home here. Will i still be able to be his payee while he is living with his father?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jessica,

      You must report your son’s move and the parent with custody will be made the payee. Also, if your son lives with his father, his father’s income and assets will be considered in determining whether he continues to be eligible for SSI while living with him. If he is ineligible and the child returns to you before being ineligible for twelve months, you will not have to file a new claim to get benefits started again.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  141. Randy maxwell says:

    My fiancee is Filipino and I am on SSI which is not considered a guaranteed income so I cannot get a visa for her to enter the United States so we can get married without a cosponsor and I have none. So I have decided to move there I have a friend that can help me there get a internet business going two make a livin my question is the Social Security owe’s me ten thousand in back pay on my SSI benefits if I’m leaving the country will I still get it? and it is due to be paid in January as they now split the back pay in 3rd’s .can I get it early seeing as how I am leaving my country?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Randy,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is not payable to individuals who are out of the U.S. for more than thirty days and SSI checks are not deliverable to foreign countries. It is possible that if you leave the U.S. before your back pay is paid out it will not be payable. One of the few exceptions to installment payment of back SSI, is if a person will not longer be eligible. Perhaps if you can present proof of your intent to leave the country permanently, thus becoming ineligible, they will be able to pay the full amount of back benefits.I suggest that you make an appointment with a claims representative to discuss your situation.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  142. melonie says:

    Question my husband wants to know as he is just getting ready to start gettin soical security disability and his question is if he was to take part of his back payment and start a savings account that he does not want to touch for so many years and intrest builds up on it will that affect his disability amount each month and how much can he save before it affects his amount each month I hope that makes since he just wants a nest egg for us both just in case something happens

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Melonie,

      If your husband will be getting Social Security Disability (SSDI) and not Supplemental Security Income (SSI), he can save any amount he wants. What a person owns does not affect Social Security benefits.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  143. PATRICIA says:

    hello I have question I’m a the payee for my daughter that is 17 yrs old I get SSI for her currently, but she recently runaway, can she apply for snap since she is staying with a friend?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Patricia,

      I suggest that you check with the SNAP office about your daughter’s SNAP eligibility. You need to contact Social Security about your daughter’s new living arrangements right away and either resign as her payee or get advice on how to handle being her payee when she is not in your household. (You cannot use any of her money for your household expenses while she is she is not living in your household.)

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  144. Janice Mateo says:

    My husband and I have been separated since October of 2013. His daughter is filing a Social Security Disability Insurance form for him. She is requesting my Social Security Number, Birth Certificate and our marriage certificate for filing purposes. I am very uneasy about this. Can you direct me. I definitely will not give my Social Security Number or Birth Certificate.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Janice,

      If your husband is approved for benefits, you might be eligible for dependent benefits on his earnings records now or in the future or survivor benefits if he were to die. His application asks for the spouse’s name, social security number (SSN), and date of birth. The birth certificate can be submitted in the future if he is approved and you are potentially eligible for benefits. I suggest that you ask your husband’s daughter to list your name and date of birth on the application and, if in the future, Social Security needs your SSN or birth certificate, you will submit it to them.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  145. Jessica says:

    Hello, i have a question in regards to termination of payments for disability. If benefits were terminated due to address change, what must i do to get benefits back, and how long does it take

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jessica,

      Contact the Social Security Administration with your new address. If you were receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI), benefits should be reinstated within a week or two. If you receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you need to have an interview with Social Security so they can determine your payment amount in your new location. This could take longer.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  146. tym says:

    My daughter receives ado benefits. She is 6. My question we have failed to report a change in employment status. Is there a big penalty for doing so? I also am wondering what is the difference between ‘resources’ and earned “income” ? Final question is what is the payment scale versus earning scale? How does they counter eachother? And/or how they affect the other? Thank you
    Tym

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tym,

      The following information applies to the Supplemental Security Income program. I do not know what “ado benefits” are. Resources are what you own; income is money and free shelter or free food received within a month. Earned income is income received from working; unearned income is all other income such as Social Security, investment income, and gifts. You can read about how SSI payments are calculated in the articles under the “SSI” tab on the website http://www.disabilityadvisor.com.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  147. CEB says:

    In January 2014, my grandmother went overseas to visit her children. She called/reported this to SSI before she left to stop her SSI payments. Just recently she told my parents that she thinks she likes it there and may not come back. In the meantime, we received a letter stating that there’s an overpayment of almost $12K because they believe my grandmother has been out of the country since 2012! She hasn’t traveled outside the US except for her husband’s funeral in 2007. What can we do about this? I’ve been to the local SS office and given them copies of her doctor appts and Rx receipts but they say I’m not an official representative. -Thanks in advance.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear CEB,

      Your grandmother can write up a document making you her official representative to conduct SSI business with the Social Security Administration. She should have the document notarized. She can also go to the U.S. embassy in her country and ask them to copy the pages of her passport and certify the copies as genuine.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  148. Linda says:

    My son recieves ssi and i have failed to report me getting married on time because thats when my mom and dad got sick and we was taking care of them and ended up putting my dad in hospice at a veterns hospital and its been almost two years. I always report stuff on time but just got caught up in taking care of them. I just dont wamt to get into amy trouble.and i have a review set in august.Any advice would be appericiated.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Linda,

      Report your marriage during the review and explain why you didn’t report it. Take your marriage certificate all your spouse’s (and your) financial records–W-2 forms, bank accounts, etc. to the appointment. There is a good possibility that your son is overpaid. If so, when you get the overpayment notice, if you cannot pay it all back at once, request a repayment plan within ten days of the overpayment letter. You may be able to lessen the amount you “are in trouble” by cooperating fully now

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  149. Mary says:

    My sister-in-law receives SSI and lives in a Section 8 senior apartment. My mother-in-law would like to send her a gift of $100 per month for her to use as she wants. Will this effect her SSI? Is there a special way that we need to do this?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mary,
      sister-in-law’s SSI will go down by either $80 or $100, depending on whether or not she has other countable income. If your mother-in-law wants to help her daughter, she can buy things for her daughter as long as she doesn’t pay for rent, house utilities, or food. For example, she could pay the phone bill or a dental bill directly to the phone company or the doctor’s office or buy her movie tickets.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  150. kendr a dunlap says:

    I get ssi for my 3 year old son and i kust got a text saing his monthly amount of $721 is oending and will be abvailbe August 1st but we are supposed to be getting his last installment payment this month and that hasbt pasted will it pist seperatly or some ething we already paid oyr application fees and have been accepted to a duplex we have to move out of the apartment we are at now the live on site manager/ownder is a sever drug and alcohol addict they go in our apartments and do tons of stuff that is illegal to do bit i ned to know about my sons payment abd ssi is closedfor theday and im freaking out i know we are recieving the payment this month but i just thought it would post with his monthly amount. Please help me with some answers. Thank you. Hope to hear from youasap.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kendra,

      The back pay installment will be paid separately. I suggest that you contact the local Social Security immediately (go there if possible) and explain that you and your son are in a dangerous situation and you have arranged to move elsewhere and were counting on the back pay to pay the deposits, etc. Ask if they can take the action to authorize release of the installment today.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  151. Marian says:

    Hi
    I have a friend that will be living with me. She is currently on SSI for a disability. Can she get any further assistance to help with household expenses? Also what is the limit she can have in the bank for a savings? Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marian,

      Your friend could apply for SNAP (foodstamps). Supplemental Security Income (SSI) allows $2,000 in countable resources. How much your friend can have in the bank depends on her other countable resources. Some resources don’t count such as a car of normal value (not a luxury car).

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  152. Ton says:

    We have been receiving SSI. My husband got terminated and had to transfer 401k funds into bank IRA. According to our SSI contact person after apt our SSI and Medicaid will stop because this is considered a resource. I don’t understand because we can’t touch
    the account until retirement without hefty consequences and even then only a portion can be withdrawn periodically. What options do we have if assistance stops financially and medically because we still need this assistance?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ton,

      It is correct that the IRA is a countable resource because the money can be accessed. Even though your husband would have to pay a tax penalty for taking the money out early, he can access it for your support; and, therefore, it is a countable resource. The resource limit for a couple is $3,000. If your and your husban’s countable assets drop below $3,000 within a year of your becoming ineligible, you will not have to file a new claim to get benefits started again.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  153. Gina says:

    Hello Kay,

    If a person who is a family friend moves into my household and I provide food, shelter and clothing for them will that increase the amount of SSI my children receive? Both of my children get SSI and since I work the amount they receive is based on what I make.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Gina,

      Your supporting a friend will have no impact on your children’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  154. Christopher Williams says:

    I have a question about my disability. I am on ssdi, and I receive 940 something a month, and each of my two boys receives 239? I am supposed to receive 370 a month from court ordered child support, when my ex pays it. Anyhow..these are ballpark figures. I recently got married and my spouse is on ssi disability. She receives 721 a month. My question is this:
    Will my ssdi income affect her ssi disability amt? We live on a very limited budget already, and we have not been to our appointment yet with ssi.
    Any advice or info will help.
    Thanks
    CHRIS

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Christopher,

      Your spouse should hold onto her SSI payments that she has received since you got married and not spend all the money because based on the information that you are providing, her benefit will be reduced to about $400. To see how this is calculated, read “What are deemed income and resources and how do they affect SSI payment amounts and qualifying for SSI Disability?” under the SSI tab on this website, http://www.disabilityadvisor.com.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  155. Christopher Williams says:

    i also wanted to add that my spouse is also paying out 300 a month child support. So that leaves her already with a whopping 421 dollars a month.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Christopher,

      Your wife may not be responsible for the amount of child support she is paying given her low income. She can find out by asking the court to review the support order to see if it is appropriate under the current circumstances.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  156. misty says:

    Hi Kay…. My question is my son is on SSI for his his disability. He receives $721.00 a month. I went back to work almost a year now and I have tried to get a hold of someone at the SS office and it was busy and or I kept getting hung up on. Will I get in trouble?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Misty,

      You are responsible for being sure that you report changes in your income. It is possible that your son is overpaid and you will have to repay the overpayment. I suggest that you write a letter to your local Social Security office in which you provide the date you returned to work and a a copy of all your pay stubs since then. In the letter say how many times your tried to call the office to report this and the approximate dates of when you made the attempts.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  157. Amber says:

    3 of my kids receive SSI. I have to report wages monthly. I have been and went to do so today and the automated system said I couldn’t. I’m confused. I’ve never had a problem. Is something wrong?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Amber,

      Perhaps there is a temporary problem with the automated system. I suggest that you try it on another day. If you continue to have a problem, call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 to report your earnings and the problem with the automated system.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  158. Marcus says:

    Dear Kaye, I’m 64 on SS of $717 and SSI of $24, next year @ 65 years, I’ll get a vested pension of $230, all known to SSA. A homeowner, with few (apx $1000) in assets, largely a car valued @ $800, now less with a shot transmission, and a motorcycle I’ve had since I was 22, as my primary transportation,(exempt)Medicaid pays my Rx costs monthly of $450-550. Last year I won one hundred bucks, reported it in 4 days, there was no change in SSI, some papers came but no change, it went on my 1040 tax form too..Questions, I want to sell about $200-300 of some old parts (not needed)from my motorcycle is that OK ? Also at 65 yrs with my pension, what will happen to my MEDICAID?, and will I still have to report, tho’ I’ll not get SSI $ , or what? TY for all your service.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marcus,

      You can sell the motorcycle parts. You are converting a resource to a different form so it is not income. Just watch that you do not go over the $2,000 on the first of any month. Your SSI should have been reduced by $100 two months after your won the money. Unless you are in a state that pays a substantial state SSI supplement, when you get your pension, your SSI will terminate, as will automatic Medicaid eligibility based on getting SSI. However, your income may still be low enough to qualify for Medicaid. I suggest that you try to get advance information on this. If you will not be eligible for Medicaid, you may want to enroll in and pay the premium for Part D Medicare when you turn age sixty-five. Medicare Part D provides some prescription coverage.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  159. Cici says:

    My grandmother was admitted to a nursing facility three months ago and we just decided that this may be a permanent living arrangement. Will the facility report this change to Social Security or do I need to do this on her behalf? I have been using the SSI payments to pay all her rent and utilities but now that she is going to be permanent resident at the facility will I get in trouble for using her payments?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Cici,

      During the time that you thought your grandmother would return to her home, it was okay to use her Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to keep the home you thought she would return to. However, there is a catch: If more than half of the nursing home bill is being paid by Medicaid, she may have been eligible for only $35 a month SSI beginning with the first full month she was in the nursing home. Report to Social Security right away that you just learned she will not be coming home. They will tell you what documentation you need to provide and will determine whether your grandmother is overpaid.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  160. samantha says:

    Hello. I get ssi for 2 of my 3 children each get 721 a month. I got a letter asking me to provide pay stubs, bank statement and unemployment records. So I have a couple of questions. 1. I lost my job and now receive unemployment but I didn’t tell social security. I didn’t think I had to as long as I called every month to report my income. Will the kids ssi get cut off because of that? 2. If my Aunt just bought me my first car and it’s in my name do I need to report that to ss? 3. I don’t divide the bills in the house either. Everything goes into a big pot and gets paid at the same time. I use the card ss mailed me to pay rent or cable or even credit card bills but it says food and shelter. Can I get in trouble for that? I use credit cards to buy food and I use my money to pay rent. Should I start to break everything down by who pays what? It just seems like extra work and added at fees to do that.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Samantha,

      You are responsible for reporting all changes in your income and assets whether or not you think the change will affect your children’s check. Earned income (wages) is treated differently from unemployment (unearned income). You do need to report receiving the gift of the car. Depending on the value of the car, your children may not be eligible in the month you receive the car because its value is income to you. After that the car will not affect their eligibility.

      If only you and your children live in your household you do not have to do an even division of everything and you are providing food and shelter for your children, so you probably not misusing their benefits. The problem lies in the possible appearance that you are. I suggest that you use their card only to pay for their food, shelter, clothing, medical care, school supplies and other needs and that you pay for the cable and credit card bills with your own money. I suggest keeping a simple log of what the money is used for. Another option would be to open a bank account for each of them and have the money go to the bank account. (The account title would be “Child’s name by your name, representative payee.”) That would eliminate the card use fees and you would have cancelled checks to show the use. Checks could be written to you with annotation “rent” or other use or could be sent directly to the provider of the service or goods.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  161. Missy says:

    Hi. I am researching information on moving my 60 year old mother from MS to AL. She is currently a recipient of Medicaid and Disability and Food Stamps. I am not sure if she receives SSI? We are looking at moving her into her own residence on our property. I have no idea how benefits would change or how to begin this process. Any direction on how to start this process would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Missy,

      Your mother may have letters that say what type of benefits she is getting or her bank statement should show it. If not, she can call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 and ask. If she is receiving only Social Security, she just needs to report a change of address to Social Security and new bank information if she is changing banks. If she changes banks, she shouldn’t close the existing bank account until the first payment is deposited to the new account.

      If she is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), given she is receiving Medicaid she may be getting SSI, the amount of her SSI benefit will have to be redetermined. You should take her to the local Social Security office in Alabama to report the move. Be prepared to provide information about how much rent she will be paying for the residence on your property. If she does not pay market value for the rent and utilities, her SSI will be reduced.

      She also needs to report her move to her current food stamp office and Medicaid office and reapply for food stamps and Medicaid in Alabama. The Mississippi office may be able to provide the contact information for the office in Alabama.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  162. laura says:

    Hi, my daughter is 18 with a disability. She was getting $721.00 a month and I revived letter stating that they were dropping it to $486.00. We get food stamps, and I was wondering since she gets food from an outside source, could that be the reason They reduced it by 1/3. Confused

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Laura,

      Receipt of food stamps does not affect the amount of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payable. Assuming the reduction is correct, the reduction is due to her not paying her share of shelter costs as a member of the household or not paying market rate for her room. If you think an error has been made, your daughter can appeal the decision and present the facts regarding what she is paying.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  163. Brit says:

    Hi Kay,

    If a 22 year old who is living with his mother recently started receiving SSI benefits, will the amount the mother charges him for rent be considered income for the mother and thus, be subject to income taxes?

    Brit

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Brit,

      I am not qualified to answer tax questions. I suggest that the mother talk with the IRS or a tax accountant. Part of what she could ask is which expenses she can claim to calculate the profit from the rental income.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  164. MARTHA says:

    I have 3 kids. 1 with my husband of 10 years and 2 younger from after we separated. The 2 kids bio dad is not in the picture at all. He does not pay any support. They each receive 540 per month. Bio dad is on their birth certificate and my soon to be ex has been written off paternity. We have the 1 child together. I am on social security disability. Therefore I receive side amount and each of the 3 kids also receive an amount of 200. When I am divorced my ex will be required to pay it appears the worksheets for child support for the 1 joint child as 494. What does this affect and who does it affect and to what amount. He has given 2 checks so far for that child’s clothes and I know I need to report to but since child support is for the one not On ssi and it is not income what happens to my other kids ssi I and to my side and their side payments. I am confused and prefer to know a bit before I panic as we are just making it and everyone says I should be happy we will get child support for 1 kid but I not happy i am so Stressed out.
    Signed : rather live on no child support

    • MARTHA says:

      Clarifying the 2 not of the marriage kids are getting ssi of 540 and 200 from my ssdi each. The kids are both disabled. My 1 joint child who would receive child support is not Disabled and gets 200 my ssdi.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Martha,

      I am assuming that by “side amount” you mean Supplemental Security Income (SSI). My responses are based on that assumption.

      It is important that you report the checks for the child’s clothes right away and the support as soon as it starts. Your SSI and your child’s SSI may not be affected by the changes, but Social Security has to receive the report to make a determination. The sooner you report, the sooner you will know what your situation is.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Martha says:

        Kay

        I meant social security disability amount.
        Breaks down to this:
        Child a joint child to begin receivimg child support from her dad. She lives with me full time. She receives soc sec disability as my child because I am on social security disability note this is not ssi.
        I receive soc sec disability.
        I have two children from a different father who is not in the picture and do not receive support for. They are both disabled. They receive ssi for their disability each of 540 and the 200 from my son sec disability as my minor child each.

        My quest is to know if their children b n c’s ssi or my ssdi will be affected by my child A receiving child support. I will report though I am probably 2 months late on that now from the first surprise check for her to receive. Thank you for the replies part of the disability is severe ptsd

        • Martha says:

          200 each From my ssdi not my son. Ugh I hate spell check

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Martha,

          Your Social Security Disability benefits and children’s Social Security dependent benefits will not be affected by a child receiving child support payments. Depending on the amount of Social Security you are receiving, child support for the SSI-ineligible child could cause a reduction in the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) of the other two children. Again, you need to report this right away. If your children have an SSI overpayment, you can request that the overpayment collection be spread over several months.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  165. Lisa says:

    Hi I’m 22 and on SSI. I just had an engagement party and got checks (some of them have my name only on them, some my fiancé and others are written out to cash).

    We aren’t married so I don’t have to report what isn’t in my name, but is there anything I could/should do for the ones in my name so that I don’t lose that money from SSI?
    I’m trying to save to move out so I don’t want to have anything deducted.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lisa,

      In order not to commit fraud, you need to report the cash gifts that were specifically given to you in your name. The gifts will affect your eligibility for SSI in the month they were received if they were either more than $20 from one person or a more than $60 total from all givers. (If they are under those amounts in a single calendar quarter, the gifrts will be excluded as irregular and infrequent income.) After that the month of receipt the money you save will count toward your resource limit of $2,000. Don’t put your money together with your fiance’s until you are married or his money will count as yours.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  166. CeCe says:

    I am at my wits end. Please help me, please.
    Such a long story but I will try to shorten it as best I can.
    My son was considered absent from the household and attending school paid for by the Board of Ed. I was also back and forth between NY and Florida. Primary address and benefit was from NY.
    I went into the Fl. office on March 10th to tell them that I was bringing my son home for a few months, took in my lease explaining he would pay his share of bills. Asked about the snap (suncap) program and was told to apply later (since I was waiting for an opening in NY-no longer sure about the opening 1. he has no benefits and 2. personal reasons too).
    He was missing payments due to miscalculations regarding the sheltered income from a workshop at school once he turned 22 yrs.
    They made an incorrect update for $334 and sent me that.
    They continued to send me only $400-$457 for April, May and June.
    End of May, I was contacted by a lady from SSA via a handwritten letter (she crossed everything in the letter out) She wrote “You must call me once, leave a phone number so I can call you back. We need to update your claim and we do that every once in a while”.
    I did as she instructed but she never called me. My son is severely autistic and was just reviewed the year before.
    A few days later I get a letter stating that my son’s benefits were “stopped” not suspended.

    Within days I faxed over my reconsideration forms.
    One for the benefit amount and one for the stopped payments. She never responded to me.

    (In fact, the same lady who sent the letter had argued with me when I wanted to give her the CDR paperwork the previous year until I spoke to her supervisor who cleared everything up for me. She hated me since then and she has been making me pay for it since. I don’t like to cry for money but I have to cry over this treatment.)

    I emailed another lady in the office and the first lady who sent the letter sending attachments with my current lease, my reconsideration forms, bank statements, my written explanation. The lady who sent the letter sent me an email saying she would call me but she never did.
    Then we argued back and forth because she said she had a record of every call and that I never called. I told her I have record of my calls and faxes as well. I explained that I still have the CDR info. I sent her before (even though a lady in NY completed it for me instead so she didn’t have to do it after all but she was still upset because her supervisor told her to do it).
    She changed the status after I told her that and his benefits were no longer stopped but “suspended”. It said because we needed to update his address or direct deposit information.
    I contacted the first lady and explained everything to her.
    Then she said that she needed me to bring my son into the office for proof that he was there because they see a NY address for him in the system.
    Which should be impossible since he is with me, non-verbal, can’t read or write due to severe autism. I reminded her of the place in NY that I was waiting to open up and he is on the list. I sent her all the information from that organization and she contacted them.
    *Let me also add that when I picked him up from school she wanted proof. I gave it to her and she called the manager of the school and confirmed that I had picked him up.
    *I also sent her my outgoing airline ticket as proof.
    She confirmed all the information and had proof my son was with me but then she said she needs me to bring him in.
    ***I took him in the very next day.****
    (I also sent her our airline tickets for when we flew to Florida in March.
    I explained that my son is on a lot of meds and his school psychiatrist sent them to me for 3 months. They refused to send meds and it’s not the kind you can just stop. I begged the lady because a psychiatrist is so expensive w/o Medicaid and even working it’s a burden.)
    Once we were at the SSA office, the security guard went to the back to call her and after a few minutes he came back with a change of heart. No longer nice to me as he was before he went to the back.
    He told me the lady was called out because of her husband and to come back tomorrow.
    I explained I could not come back the next day due to work. I asked for the first lady who sent the letter. She told the guard that she didn’t want to speak to me because I was rude to her on the phone.
    **We never spoke on the phone, ever!**
    I asked for a supervisor and he told me he was going to kick me out and then he refused to speak to me. He would only speak to my husband. I am the payee rep and not my husband.
    Later that day, I emailed the lady because once I calmed down, I realized I should care about her husband first and foremost.
    I emailed her and asked if all was okay and she said yes. She said she even went back to work that day.
    She didn’t ask me anything else and that was the last contact I had with her.
    Bills are mounting and a lot of problems like dominoes.
    I went to another office in Fl to simply update his record to get him in pay status. The lady there ignored my Reconsideration forms and started asking me why I went to that office.
    She wanted even more things after seeing our IDs, she said he should be listed on the lease. Because what if he flies out somewhere else tomorrow.
    Then she says she will call the same lady, even though I asked her to at least call the other one who left for her husband.
    She said she has to speak to the same lady who sent the original letter. She called her and the original lady said “she was on her way out the door” at 3pm.
    I was told the record would be updated after the same lady who started all of this gives the greenlight.
    I really doubt it because it’s once again up to the same lady that started all of this and refused to even see me.
    They continuously ask me for things they didn’t ask me for before.
    I am stuck and I really need his pay status on right away.
    There is so much more I can tell you but that is it.
    I said I would get a lawyer, contact the news, write people, complain and this lady just won’t budge. She ignored my reconsideration forms.
    It’s as if I never filed. They still have the NY address on record as if I never went to the office in March or emailed my lease in June.
    All the payments missing are over $3000 now. I added in the 2.5 years that they failed the pay his state supplement in my reconsideration but other than that it’s the miscalculated payments because of overestimating his pay and not raising his pay after I told them he’d pay his share and took in my lease as I was previously instructed to do. Also no pay since June. Normally 2 months wouldn’t break me but with so many things going on I am at my wits end.
    I am so upset. I did everything they asked and still they won’t budge.
    Sorry I typed a lot but I just want you to have all the information and was not sure about what to leave out.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear CeCe,

      I rarely suggest this, but I think it may be time to contact the Florida Congressperson for the district you are living in with all the information you gave me, except give him or her the names of the offices and employees involved and ask him or her to inquire what can be done to start your son’s benefits again and assure that your appeals regarding the calculations are addressed.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  167. Gabriel says:

    My question is my daughter is 15 yrs old & receiving ssdi benefits and my girlfriend has a pending case of Ssi & ssdi and her and I want to live together. If my girlfriend is approved and she moves in with my daughter and I , who’s bennifits would be affected and if affected what percentage would it affect. My daughter recieves $721.00 a month .

    • Kay Derochie says:

      As long as you and your girlfriend are not married, her income will not affect your daughter’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits (I don’t think your daughter is getting Social Security Disability [SSDI].) As long as your girlfriend pays her share of shelter and food expenses, but not more than her share, no one’s SSI will be affected. If your girlfriend is approved for SSDI, it will not be affected by where she lives or with whom.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  168. CeCe says:

    Sorry again for the long note. I believe you would have answered me.
    God heard me! God helped me! God is a Present Help!
    They put it through and are now only wrong for paying me the wrong amount.

  169. sherica says:

    I receive 321.47 per month in ssi for my son , I have one other child and I am pregnant with my third . I no longer work and have started paying 350.00 per month for rent at my grandparents home. My question is with me paying some rent will my sons benefits increase or stay the same?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sherica,

      Your son’s SSI might increase if you are using his SSI to pay rent and your income has stopped. You need to report these changes to the Social Security Administration and have them determine whether an increase is payable. Provide a letter from your grandparents that confirms your son is paying rent and take proof of when you stopped working. If you are getting unemployment, that needs to be reported also.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  170. Dan says:

    What a great resource, thank you Kay! I have two questions:

    1. I have an 8 year old son receiving SSI. His mother (also disabled) is the representative payee, and we are divorcing. We have joint legal and physical custody. The final divorce judgement stipulates that his SSI be divided between the parents. There is no child support ordered in the final judgement.

    My ex wife is insisting that I create a special needs trust to receive the court ordered share of his SSI, to protect his eligibility. I don’t believe there is any need for that. If anything a separate joint account in his name and mine for recording purposes seems adequate. What are your thoughts? She did create a (d)(4)(A) special needs trust for him, for the temporary child support I was previously paying to flow through, along with his benefits, with the goal of also protecting her benefits (not of concern to me).

    2. The divorce judgement now requires that we sell the martial home which she had been residing in, as she has been unable to refinance in sufficient time. When we do sell, she will have a cash balance of nearly $300k and I will have a cash balance of nearly $200k. Presumably, we will both reinvest in new homes at some point, though it may take some time given how badly the 4 year divorce has impacted our credit scores. Obviously, this puts us over the asset limit at least until we both purchase homes.

    Is there any way to preserve, put on hold, or restore our son’s eligibility for SSI, and more importantly, Medicaid?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Dan,

      If the custodial parent (the parent in the home Social Security determines is your son’s residence) buys a home and his or her assets drop below $4,000 (the parent can have $2,000 and the excess counts toward the child’s $2,000 limit) within less than a year of your son becoming ineligible due to the parent’s excess resources, his SSI can start again without a new application and new medical approval.

      As far as the trust account goes, that is between you and the child’s mother. One option is to set up a bank account with the title “you son’s name by your name,” which shows the money belongs to your son buy only you have access to it. Social Security requires the representative payee to account for the use of the child’s funds. You should be prepared to give your ex-wife a receipt or other proof of receiving the money each month and you also need to track how the money is spent for the child (housing, food, clothing, school supplies, medical care, recreation, etc. so that you can give her a copy once a year when she has to account for funds.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  171. virdie johnson says:

    my question is if a married couple with the husband recieving ssi f 721.00 and their rent is 525.oo monthly thats not including electri and water if the wife returs to part time work how many hours is she able to work without affecting his checl

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Der Virdie,

      The number of hours you can work before affecting your husband’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment amount depends on the rate of pay per hour. I believe that if you have no minor children in the household and neither of you has unearned income, you can earn about $807 per month before causing a reduction in your husband’s benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  172. Gloria says:

    Why is social security staying so low? Why does the federal government allocate 35-40grand per prisoner and disabled people who can barely work are forced to live on well below 10 grand a year? Do they plan on fixing this? Many people I know who are disable are loosing their children and apartments due to the inability to pay rent bills and purchase food. Will the department of social security do anything better for the American citizen? The defense department the border patrol and the war on drugs uses more collectively then poor disabled citizens. It’s so hard to finds place to live. Is there a group or a lawyer or a coalition that could hear our voices so they could see how hard it is to get to a food pantry or buy children clothes on this income. The threats of not having any assets are constant… Maybe rich families who use the system for their kids could be pushed off rather then nearly homeless poverty stricken disabled folks who are so many pharmaceuticals we keep them in business. I’m wanting a reform because I have a disability it looks like a seizure but it’s a mini stroke and employers have begged me to leave. I keep trying and I keep meeting discrimination. I feel I can’t afford to live on this income I am grateful for it but surely something can be done?

  173. CeCe says:

    You are seriously incredible Kay Derochie.
    I appreciate you so much.
    Thank you for the great advice!

  174. B. L. says:

    I am a medicaid service coordinator. I have a consumer who receives SSI benefits due to his disability. He is currently in the hospital and has been now for several months. His grandmother would like to know if she should notify the Social Security Administration about his extended hospital stay? Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear B.L.,

      Yes, your client’s grandmother should report the change right away. It is likely that her grandson is substantially overpaid.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  175. Mimi says:

    Hi, I have a question that I’m receiving ssi for 290 each month and I live in someone house for free but now, they can’t let me to live there for free anymore, and I have to move out. I want to rent an apartment for 650. The thing is I don’t have any income. What should I do? Will my ssi payment increase? . Can someone cosign me to rent an apartment? Do it affect my benefit? Thank you for understanding my questions.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mimi,

      If you are receiving $290 in Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you must have some income other than free food and/or housing because the maximum reduction for free food and/or housing results in a benefit of $481. Changes in countable income affect your SSI payment amount two months after the change occurs. For example, if you stop receiving free food or shelter in September, your SSI would not go up until November.

      You could move into an apartment and share it with other people. If you pay your share of rent and utilities (excluding phone and cable) and pay for food with food stamps, your SSI would go up in two months. At that point in time, you would have more income and could consider whether you have sufficient finances to live alone. (Your share is one-half if two people are sharing housing; one-third if three people are sharing, and so on.) If someone who is not living with you pays the rent, it will be income to you and result in a reduction in SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  176. Lola says:

    My child gets SSI and usually lives with me. If he goes and stays with his dad for over 50% of a month, do I have to claim this and will I loose the benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lola,

      The Social Security Administration (SSA) may consider your child’s primary residence to be with his father because he lives there more than half the time. If so, his father’s income, not yours, will be considered in determining your son’s SSI disability. You need to report the situation to SSA as soon as possible.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  177. Nia says:

    Hi, I get ssi through my mother because she is disabled and I am 17. Is it true that I will continue to receive benefits as long as I stay in school like go to trade school or college. Also will my benefits be affected if I get a part time job I receive $726

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Nia,

      Your dependent benefits will continue through the later of the date you turn eighteen or if you are still in high school age nineteen. No benefits are paid while you go to a trade school or college unless you are still under age eighteen. While receiving benefits, you can earn up to $15,480 a year before your benefits are affected.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  178. Keysa says:

    Hi Kay if you on ssdi will your benefit decrease if you get married and at what combined income level must we file a federal income tax.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Keysa,

      Your Social Security Disability (SSDI) will not decrease when you get married. Part of your Social Security will be taxable if your and your husband’s adjusted gross income is over $32,000. The IRS can provide a worksheet for you to calculate how much of your Social Security would be taxable.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  179. Michelle says:

    I have a question, my son is on SSI and his dad is on SSD but he is under his mom’s name she is his res. payee if he moves in with us will that affect my son’s SSI?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Michelle,

      I am understanding from your question that your son lives with you and you are asking about your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) if his father were to move in. My response is based on that understanding. Your son’s financial eligibility will be redetermined considering his father’s income and resources in addition to yours. Depending on the amount of his father’s Social Security, your son’s SSI could be reduced or stop. I suggest that you ask Social Security to give you an estimate calculatiion of your son’s SSI before his father moves in so that you will know the impact in advance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  180. John says:

    I am asking a question for a brother. Okay my brother married this lady who receives ssi from her deceased mum , he is currently not working and planning on moving in with her. is wife already lost part of the benefit since she is married.. He wants to know what would happened if he moves in with her but he is not working at this time.. would that cause his wife to loose all the benefit being the fact that he moved in with her, but he has no income at this point.

    thank you ..

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear John,

      Your brother’s wife has apparently been receiving Disabled Adult Child Social Security benefits, not Supplemental Security Income (SSI). She became ineligible when she got married and needs to report the marriage right away.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  181. Keysa says:

    Hi Kay
    if you get ssdi for your kids can someone claim them on their
    taxes ie. your Spouse or do you have to do taxes if you worked half a
    year be for being approved. In the Future can your Spouse claim them
    on their taxes?

  182. jamil says:

    Hey Kay, I’m about to turn 18 in a couple of weeks and my grandmother who is my guardian handles my ssi. But I have have recently moved in with my father at the beginning of June. I was wondering how I could get my check to come directly to me instead of my grandma before my birthday which is on the first of next month. Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jamil,

      You can apply to be your own payee now although, if the request is granted, the change may not take place until you are eighteen. Have you applied to have your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) continued as an adult? If you haven’t as yet, you and your grandmother should make that application as soon as possible.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  183. Yojharis says:

    Hhello., I’m The representative payee of my son! I call social security to ask question bout how his reconsideration process was going they say he will be recovery his benefits but I will No longer will be his regressive and they will send me a letter bout it? Any reason why they would do that I’m they custodial parent! Is anything else I Can do?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Yojharis,

      If your son is now eighteen and mentally competent, he will be his own payee. If he is under eighteen or not capable of handling his benefits, you can go to Social Security and ask to continue to be his payee because he lives with you. Social Security decides who will be payee and the decision cannot be appealed, but you can explain all the reasons why you should be payee.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Yojharis says:

        I dont know what to do im really confuse he is 13 !!any advice any paperwork i shoul take down to the office ? Im have custody if him and drive myself crazy thinkin why they want change me as his payee .. I was thinkin if they dont want me to be anymore can i tell them to ñame ny mother? And should i take ny son wit me when i go down there so they can i ask him question ??? Please help me any advice thanks so much

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Yojharis,

          The only way to find out why a change in payee is being planned is to go into Social Security to discuss it. You do not need to take your son, although you can if you wish. You could propose your mother as payee in your place. If you do, she should go with you.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  184. MrSexyBlueEyes says:

    I AM SO CONFUSE ABOUT ALL OF IT I STARTED GET SSI/SSA BACK IN 2012 And I still get it I have so much problems I just dunno wat to do u am visiting in TEXAS And I need to know if I hace to start over or if I decide to live there??? Can my payee (Mother) still ve my Payee???

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear MrSexyBlueEyes,

      If you are visiting and will not be in Texas an entire calendar month you do not need to report your visit to Social Security. If you are going to be there a full month, such as arriving in July and leaving in September, you must report the change. You don’t need to file a new claim, but the amount of your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit has to be reviewed based on your living arrangements in Texas. You mother can continue to be your payee if she is able to pay your bills and knows what your needs are and take care of them from where she is living. (Note that you would not have to report your visit if you were receiving only Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  185. MrSexyBlueEyes says:

    OH BTW HI EVERYONE

  186. Marie says:

    My 5 yr old son receive benefits and i started working 8/5/14. How long do u have to report change in income and could i report change over the phone or do i need to go to main office in my area. what is the most i could make a month and will they cut me off if i make to much. Its just me n my son.

    • Marie says:

      by the way i just received my first check as of today 8-25-14

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marie,

      You should report the change in income in the same month that it occurs (August). You can report the change by phone, but you will have to also submit proof of the date you started working and the amount of your earnings. Thereafter, you will have to report your earnings monthly. A reduction in Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits will begin to occur when your earnings reach about $1,500 gross per month and your son will become ineligible for SSI when your work earnings reach about $3,000.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  187. Marie says:

    so does that mean i cant work a full time and part time job… whats the most i can make without them cutting me completely off…

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marie,

      Federal SSI can be paid as long as your child is eligible for at least one dollar. As explained in my previous response, you can earn up to about $3,000 before your son is completely ineligible. Every two dollars you earn over about $1,500 will result in a one dollar reduction in his benefit. You can figure out your gross monthly earnings by multiplying your rate of pay times the number of hours you will be working each month.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  188. Marie says:

    WOW! THANK U SO MUCH THAT WAS SUCH A GREAT HELP.. THIS IS THE BEST INFORMATION N ALL I HAD TO DO WAS ASK AND U REPLY BACK FAST. AGAIN THANK U! THANK U! THANK U

  189. Joe says:

    Hi,

    I have 2 children diagnosed with autism who each receive $721 per month. I just got a job making $52,500 a year ( I was unemployed for a while before); our family is 5: myself, my wife, my eldest son (no disability) and the two children with autism. How do I figure out what my children’s SSI payments will be reduced to?

    Thanks,

    Joe

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Joe,

      You are now earning enough that your children’s benefits will definitely be reduced. You need to report your new job right away taking verification of your start date and wages. Social Security will recalculate the children’s benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  190. Virginia says:

    My brother is in a LTC facility in California. He receives SSDI but his share of cost is only $30.00 a month at the facility. The balance of his SSDI is building up in his bank account. I am his POA and I pay his bills. My question is: Does he have too much in his bank? What is his limit a year? Should I start spending it for his needs? Do I file taxes for him?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Virginia,

      If your brother is receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI) and not Supplemental Security Income (SSI), there is no limit to the amount of savings he can have. You should use some of the the money for his needs. I would also double check that his share of the costs is $30. Unless he has long-term care insurance, usually all a person’s income but $30 has to be used to pay for the care. With regard to taxes, I suggest that you discuss your brother’s income with a tax accountant to see what filing is necessary.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  191. heather says:

    hello I am about to receive suplemental security income . My babies father owns a house he inherited and its paid off . My babies father is also going to be my payee bc I cant manage money . Is it ok if I rent it from him to rent to me ? Is it ok if he and our son live in the house ? Do I need to live alone ? My babies father has no income bc he had cancer .. but he helps watch me and the baby .

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Heather,

      If you and your baby live in the house alone and pay market value for the rent and pay your utilities and food costs, you can rent the house without its affecting your Supplemental Security Income. If your baby’s father lives in the house with you and your child, to avoid a reduction in benefits, you have to pay at least one-third of the property taxes and utilities (excluding phone and cable) and either buy your food separately or pay for one-third of the food.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • heather says:

        So it ok if I rent the house from my babies daddy ? Even if he ownes it ? Even if he is my payee ? So should he writte a lease agreement for me ? Does my babies daady have to live with me to be my payee bc he has another kid and his own place . . Were friends and hes nice and always seeing our kid .. but we could use space …

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Heather,

          Your friend does not have to live with you to be your payee. There is no reason you can’t rent from him; however, it is a good idea to have a written rental agreement.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

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