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What requirements do I have to meet for SSI Disability eligibility?

By   /  March 3, 2016  /  166 Comments

Acquaint yourself with the various SSI Disability eligibility requirements you must meet to qualify for SSI benefits.

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Factors That Govern SSI Disability Eligibility

In addition to either being age sixty-five or meeting the SSI Disability eligibility text, which is discussed in “What Medical Conditions Are Required to Meet SSI Disability Qualifications and to Get an SSI Approval?” you have to meet several non-medical and non-age requirements to get SSI.

Citizenship and Alien Status

You must be either a U.S. citizen or national or a qualified noncitizen. A qualified noncitizen is a person who is in an immigration status that allows payment of SSI and who meets other noncitizen requirements. For more information about SSI eligibility requirements for noncitizens, see our article “How Can a Noncitizen Go about Qualifying for SSI Disability?

U.S. Residency Required

With few exceptions, you must also be a resident of—that is live in—one of the fifty U.S. states or the North Mariana Islands. You will continue to be eligible for SSI if you are temporarily out of the United States and North Mariana Islands for less than less than thirty consecutive days. If you are gone for thirty days or more, you will not be considered in the U.S. for the residency test until you have been back in the U.S. for thirty consecutive days.

A child who is living with a parent who is a member of the U.S. Armed Forces assigned to permanent shore duty outside the U.S. is an exception to the residency requirement. If you have an SSI-eligible child and receive orders to move overseas, contact your local Social Security office or call Social Security at 800-772-1213 before leaving the U.S. If you are already overseas and your think your child may be eligible for SSI, contact the U.S. Embassy or Consular Office or write to the Social Security Administration, Attn: SSI Military Children Overseas Coordinator, 1 Frederick Street, Suite 100, Cumberland Maryland 21502.

You have the same reporting responsibilities for your disabled child as for a child living in the U.S. Additionally, you must report if you leave the U.S. Armed Forces and remain abroad. A list of events to report can be found at “What Do I Have to Report to the Social Security Administration Once I Start to Get SSI Benefits?

Application Requirements

You must file an application; apply for other cash benefits to which you may be eligible, such as Social Security or Veteran’s Compensation; and give the Social Security Administration permission to verify financial factors of eligibility, including contacting financial institutions to obtain your financial records.

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  • Published: 4 months ago on March 3, 2016
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  • Last Modified: March 4, 2016 @ 4:27 pm
  • Filed Under: SSI

166 Comments

  1. vanessa says:

    my daughter is almost 5 months old and she was diagnosed with seizures will be quality for ssi benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Vanessa,

      The severity of your daughter’s condition and the amount of your family income and assets will determine her eligibility. You can view an income chart to see if your income falls within the limits. On the chart “ineligible” means non-disabled minor children in the household. Number of parents means parents or step-parents of the disabled child. http://www.socialsecurity.gov/ssi/text-child-ussi.htm.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  2. Marie says:

    I’m a 25 yr old female i was diagnosed with Hyperthyroid disease seven years ago recently this year I was put in the hospital for a thyroid storm I stayed in the hospital a total of 3 days. I was denied benefitd backs in 2014 so I reapplied April of this year I work part at a nursing home. I received a letter saying I was denied for SSDI because I haven’t worked long enough and i was diagnosed with anxiety, depression, but also I’ve had trouble with my vision, my heart, etc alot of things going on with my body i’ve talked to all kinds of lawyers no one will take my case. I’m on about 5 different types of medicines which make me feel all different types of ways, and i don’t know how much longer I can work at my job I need some advice please.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marie,

      You do not say how much you are earning in your job, but if you are earning less than $1,130 gross and your total family income and assets are limited you may be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Usually screening for SSI is done at the same time as you apply for Social Security, so you may already have an SSI claim waiting for a medical decision. I suggest you call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 to find out. If you do not have an SSI claim, your can file an application.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  3. Jorge Najera ceja says:

    Hello my name is George I am 26 years old and in 2009 I had a serious car accident with the cops from alameda. They accepted their fault but in that car accident I broke my fimer and the bone from my left leg so they had to do an operation on me and they left me with a pice of metal in my left leg to replace my bone. This doesn’t allow me to be standing up for more then 20 min cause then I start to get a serious pain in my leg that makes me feel like am going to pass out from the pain. The pain pills they give me help but the pain comes back within 10 min. I was wondering if I could culified for Disability.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jorge,

      If you are able to work in a job sitting down, you will not qualify for benefits. Whether or not there are such jobs you can do depends on your education and work experience. I suggest that you file a claim and at the same time you contact your state’s Department of Vocational Rehabilitation to see if you qualify for services to identify and possibly provide education or training for work that you can do seated. You might also talk to career counselors at your local community college.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  4. Diana says:

    Hi, I am turning 62 years old this month and have been on disability for almost 2 years. I get $2,095 from social security because of my disability (heart condition, diabetes, etc). I will start receiving Medicare benefits this July. I was married to my husband for over 30 years but separated last May. We still live together, although he still lives in the basement in a house we currently own together. Divorce is out of the question for religious reasons. Each pays half of the mortgage and utilities. He retired at 62, he just turned 65 this month and he was getting a modest social security check of $675 and now with Medicare being deducted from his paycheck he only gets $553 per month. We filed taxes together last year since we were both enrolled in the Marketplace as husband and wife. He now wants to file for SSI since his income is so low. Will he be eligible to apply for SSI since we live in the same house and my income exceeds the minimum? Under Georgia law, we can be separated living in the same house and still be considered separated, I believe. He tried to apply for QMB from Medicaid but he was denied because he was told he was eligible for SSI. It is very confusing since when you call SSA they won’t tell you much information and they treat you like you owe them something. Unfortunately, he was planning to retire and continue working, but he suffers from emphysema among other things, which doesn’t allow him to work (he never applied for disability though, only SS at 62). Will he be allowed to receive SSI while living with me, or does he have to move out? I really prefer him to stay in the basement, since I need help with dressing and bathing and he still helps me with that. He does get help with the Snap card ($160 or so, I think per month in food stamps). He has a friend who doesn’t make much money in social security and they help him with medicare fees, deductible, etc. Right now, he can’t even go to the doctor because he can’t afford the deductible. Thank you for any information that you can provide me.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Diana,

      It is very likely that your income will count in determining your husband’s eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). I suggest that he check with the local social services office to see if your state has a program that pays a relative for providing home care to a disabled person. If so, he could receive a small stipend or wage that might make him ineligible for SSI and, thus, eligible for Medicaid under another criteria. Also, if he has not applied for spouse’s benefits on your earnings record, he might do so to see if it is more than his own retirement benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay
      Your husband should be eligible for a spouse’s benefit on your earnings record, which might increase his income a little.

  5. marlene says:

    Hi mi dad had a hart attack and have to haf six bypass like a year ago, after having sergery and recovering like for 4 month he apply for social segurity disable and was denied, so due to his need he when back to work without even healing properly bcz he need it money in other to sustain himself, then after that he haf like 2 more failler having to go back to the hospital recovering againg and returning back to work now after 8 month i. Job he recently had a stroke and currently in the hospital without speach and hole leftsidw inmobile. Now he live in st thomas virgi. Island and i live in houston, i want to bring him with me to houston as sion he get a litter better and doctor aprrove that he could flight but i want to know what should i do to get benefit for him bcz defenetly he cant work again only job he know how to do is construcción that what he been doing for more than 20 years. I need to find the help for him bcz me myself dont have the income to help him whit what he need. Plsss help, his age is 60 years old, what should i do?
    Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Marlene,

      File a new claim for your father. Give his medical history that led up to the stoke. Explain you are filing the claim because he is unable to speak and he is partially paralyzed.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  6. Thomas says:

    My wife is disabled but she did volunteer work for the 10 years before she became disabled. Is there any way to get her declared disabled by SSA even though she does not qualify for SSD due to not meeting income requirements? We could get a break on property taxes and there are a couple of other helps available outside of SSD she could use if she is officially disabled. She cannot work and has to have a cane to walk and it’s very obvious from seeing her she is disabled but without the federal government declaration our local government won’t recognize her hemiparesis as a disability.
    Thanks for any help you can offer. I never realized that that homemakers and full-time volunteers are not valuable enough to our society for us to help them if they become disabled.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Thomas,

      If your family income and assets are within the limits for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), which is administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA), your wife could be eligible for SSI disability benefits. Otherwise, she can apply for dependent benefits on your earnings record when you start to receive Social Security. You can learn more about the SSI financial requirements by reading the articles under the SSI tab on the navigation bar at the top of this web page.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  7. Jessica says:

    Hi, I have been receiving disability since I was 20 years old, I am now 32 years old and my husband that is 29 years old got injured and his doctor told him to apply for disability. My question is, if my husband gets disability will that effect my disability payments? My second question is that since my husband has been out of work now for over a year, he is now behind on his child support. We live halfway across the country and he has tried calling the courthouse to ask how he can either lower or put his child support on hold and he has had no luck. Right now we just live off of my disability and that is $816.00 a month. If he does get on disability will they take all his money for back owed child support? Thank you, Jessica

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jessica,

      If you and your husband receive Social Security Disability (SSDI), your benefits will not affect each other. If one of you is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), the income of the other does affect the SSI payment amount.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  8. Tamika says:

    I have a 9 year old daughter. She has been diagnosed with ADHD, ODD. I have been taking her to therapy for the last 4 years and she has been medication for about 8 months. I struggle a times to provide better being that I am disabled. I applied for SSI for her. When I told the teacher that I need her to fill out a questionnaire for Social Security she told me that she could get labeled in school and not get into a good school. I’m not sure what to do if we need help. I don’t want to hinder her future. Her behavior in school isn’t that bad and has been getting better. Not sure what to do?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tamika,

      I can not advise you on what decision to make. I can mention a couple things to consider. Social Security will not release information to a third party without your written authorization for your child or your child’s once she is eighteen. If your daughter is already on a behavior program or specialized education program at school, then that is already in her record. If she is not, a copy of the report the teacher made for Social Security might go into her school records. Whether that would follow her through to her senior year when she is applying to colleges, I don’t know. You might talk more with the teacher to find out more about what she means.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  9. Raymond says:

    This site makes me sad , to see so many others with the same struggles as Me . I thought I was alone.. I’ve been on disabled only 5 yrs. and its so hard to make it work .. Stay strong everyone .

  10. Raymond says:

    I’m on SSDI and I am going to be homeless soon . How will ss disability keep in touch with me ? Will they call me ? What happens if I lose touch for a while ? Will my benefits be safe ? its all I have . My case was just reviewed and its been six months , I think I am good for at least a couple of years . What do you think ? I am so nervous .. Any advice ?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Raymond,

      I suggest that you either get a bank account or request a DirectExpress card so that you can access your benefits every month. You do also need a mailing address in case Social Security tries to reach you. If possible have a reliable friend or relative accept mail for you from Social Security so that you can check with them every two weeks to see if you have Social Security mail. Or, if you have the money, rent a post office box.

      If you receive SSDI (Social Security Disability) and not Supplemental Security Income (you posted under a Supplemental Security Income article), where you live will not affect your benefits. If you receive SSI, where you live can affect the amount of your benefits so you need to report if you become homeless.

      Also before you are homeless, consider whether there is any possibility of renting a room in a private home rather than being without shelter.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Raymond says:

        I do have Direct Express . I Just worry about the contact part . I have few people left in my life . Thanks for your thoughts . Sorry for posting in wrong place .

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Raymond,

          You might check with local social service agencies, especially for the homeless, to see if any can serve as a secure mailing address for you.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  11. Rob Smith says:

    Hi, I am a adult on the autistic spectrum and diagnosed with PDD-NOS. I want to move out from my parents place and look for my own. I want to apply for SSI. Do I need a lawyer for that? or should I apply on my own. I can’t seem to hold a job.
    thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rob,

      You can apply while living with your parents. You will find informational articles about filing a disability claim under the “Apply for SSD” tab on the navigation bar at the top of this web page. Much of the information applies to SSI also. Be as specific as you can about why each job ended especially if you think that the job ended due to your mental health conditions. (If you are unmarried and you became disabled prior to age twenty-two and either of your parents is receiving Social Security or is deceased, you can also file a Childhood Disability Benefits [CDB] claim on your parents earnings record.)

      You can use a lawyer for the initial application, but often attorneys only want to represent you if you have been denied because they collect fees from back pay. When you hire a Social Security attorney, you do not have to pay any legal fees up front and you will pay attorney fees only if you are approved for benefits. Social Security law sets the amount your attorney can charge, and the Social Security Administration pays the attorney directly from your retroactive award before they send your back pay to you.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  12. Mary says:

    How does someone survive on SSDI but is over qualified for SSI? I have so many health issues and my amount from SSDI isn’t enough to live on. I get help paying for my Medicare/Medicaid but I need to know how I can get more SSDI.
    Can anyone help me?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mary,

      Your Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefit amount is based on your earnings record and, therefore, will not increase unless there is a general cost-of-living adjustment. If you have not applied for SNAP (formerly called food stamps), you might file an application to see if you are eligible.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  13. wanda says:

    I am currently receiving $935 on SS disability and have medical QMB that pays for my yearly deductible, monthly premium and I get extra help for prescriptions. I have been disabled since 2001. This QMB is based on the rent and utilities that I pay to live to with my parents. That’s$500. (That’s what I told I would I have pay in order to get the extra estate help.) The rest I use for my food ,phone, car insurance,etc.I just got told that they are moving in with my niece. They aren’t selling the house yet but I cannot afford to live to here by myself. It is a big house. The electric bill here alone is very high. I am out of the city limits,away from everything. I will be homeless. I don’t know what to do. They are moving in a few months. I need help. Please. What can I do? I am scared to death.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Wanda,

      I suggest that you contact whatever social services exist within the city you refer to to find out whether there are any government-subsidized rental units available in your area. You might also look into renting a room or a studio apartment from someone in town. If your housing expenses go up, you may qualify for food stamps. Lastly, perhaps there are family members, such as your niece, who would help you with the logistics of this transition to new housing.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  14. michelle says:

    I have a question I just got approve for ssi..But because I am married they are asking for my husband income …He got state disability in 2014 and he also had to pay child support..they deducted it from his check .. he only got it for a year ..and now he has no income ..he was getting arould $600 a month .. will this affect my ssi since it was a long time ago .. please let me know …thanks Michelle ..

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Michelle,

      Your husband’s income in the months that you are entitled to Supplemental Security Income benefits will affect the amount of your payment in those months in 2014. The calculation will take into account the child-support payments he was making up to $360 a month per child.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Michelle says:

        Sorry I am not undersanding what you are saying sorry ..I also have a learning Disability… Does this mean I won’t get my Benefits or back pay ??? thanks Michelle …

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Michelle,

          I cannot find your question to explain my answer better. Can you either have someone explain my answer to you or post your question again?

          Thank you,
          Kay

          • michelle says:

            what I’m trying to say is ..my husband got state disability in 2014 and now I got approved for SSI.. would I still be approved for Social Security…and because we’re married how does that change everything.. right now my husband only gets $300 and Welfare …I hope you can explain it to me because I’m lost right now ..thanks Michelle ..

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Michelle,

            I do not reply via email, only on this site. I removed your email address to protect your privacy.

            Your husband’s income will be considered in determining your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility, although welfare payments are not countable income. His SDI payments will be countable in the months he received them.

            Social Security Disability eligible is based on whether or not you have enough work credits. If you do, you will be eligible regardless of your husband’s income and his income will not affect your payment amount.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  15. anna says:

    I know a person who is a resident alien in this country. Worked and paid taxes for 10+ years. She is 56 y/o. Her diagnosis is Cancer lung and colon. She wants to know of she can get SSI. She is currently only getting $131.00 foods stamps and she receives a care waiver( someone gets paid to takecare of her at home. She can not work due to chemotherapies. Any suggestion I’d really appreciated. Thank you!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Anna,

      The person you are inquiring about may have enough work to qualify for Social Security Disability based on her earnings record. Some legal aliens can also be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). I suggest that she apply for both benefits through her local Social Security office. She should take her immigration documents with her to the interview.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  16. Patti says:

    Question: my daughter has been on SS Disability since she was 24 years old. She will be 40 in a couple of months. Since she was so young when she became disabled, she did not have a lot of income in her history for the monthly payment consideration. She only receives $873 a month which is so far below the poverty level it is insane. Even though she does have Medicare, she has supplemental insurance to pay for and a lot of medications/prescriptions to pay for. Her monthly income is not enough to live on, with any hope of independence. Is there any way to apply for an increase, or is she eligible for SSI? Is there any hope for her to be able to provide for herself? Any help you can offer would be appreciated. Oh, one more thing, we did have to get a lawyer in the beginning and appeal twice in order to get her approved for her disability payments/income. Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Patti,

      Your daughter’s Social Security is just a little too high for eligibility for SSI. She might look into programs that assist with the cost of Medicare premiums. More information is available at http://www.medicare.gov. Another possibility is that her income might be low enough that she could be eligible for Medicaid. Eligibility requirement vary from state to state.

      She could apply to get on a waiting list for government subsidized housing. If she purchases food separately from the rest of the household (assuming she lives with you), she might be eligible for SNAP (food stamps).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Bradley collins says:

      My mother is waiting for her approval to qualify for benefits. She lives with boyfriend and they split the bills but they are adding up and I believe it’s an unhealthy situation. Most likely you would to if you saw for yourself. That being said she has a host of medical problems and can no longer work and needs better care than what she is getting where she is living. Her FMLA has run out and she will most likely quit or be let go. My question is this: can she live with her sister and uncle who are both on disability while she gets better and figures out if she can possibly go back to work or if she will be disabled for the rest of her life, without disrupting my aunt and uncles disability or my mothers chance at being approved? I love my mother deeply and im trying to do what is best for her to live the rest of her life in full, but she just has excuse such as this living arrangement question. She cannot have bills of any kind if she finds out she can’t continue to work. Family is willing to help the best they can but constantly throwing money at the problem is not helping for the simple fact that it’s always recurring. This has been a long fight for all with mental and physical health. So I ask if there is any suggestions I’m all ears. Thank you
      Bradley C

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Bradley,

        Your mother living with her uncle and sister will not affect any Social Security benefits they receive. If they receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) their benefits will not be affected as long as she pays no more than her share of the expenses (one third with three in the household). If she is going to buy her food separately, she could apply for SNAP (food stamps). Living with those relative will not hurt her chances of being approved for disability benefits.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  17. April says:

    Hello. I need some advice. I am a newlywed with two children. I have an eight year old son from a previous relationship. He is currently receiving SSI in the amount of $733/mo. My husband makes around $2200/mo before taxes. It may seem like a lot, but once rental, medical, dental, vision, and life insurance comes out it really puts a damper on things financially. I am a smoker so our policy increased. He now pays $220 every two weeks. This does not include rent (850), water, power, energy, car insurance, and/ or groceries. Apparently, we make too much income to receive any kind of assistance. I would like to know if my husband’s income will affect my son’s SSI? Are we at our $2000 limit to receive SSI?… I am not sure how this works. I was a single mom raising a three year old child back in 2010. I was working at a college back then cleaning tables… I guess I’m just trying to figure out how social security view married couples. I want to make sure I don’t make any mistakes as far as reporting our income… please help.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear April,

      Income is money or free housing or food received in a month. Resources are cash and other things you own that you carry over from month to month.

      You and your husband can have $3,000 in resources. (one vehicle and some other things are not counted toward the limit.) Any excess above $3,000 counts toward your disabled child’s $2,000 resource limit.

      Your husband’s wages are earned income (not a resource). The only part of his wages that would be a resource would be the amount left at the end of the month and carried over to the next month. If the family has no other income with two parents and one ineligible child in the household, your disabled child’s SSI should not go down. You must, however, report your marriage right away and report your husband’s gross earnings monthly.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  18. Annette Contreras says:

    Yes I’ve been on SSI for 20 years and just recently about two weeks ago I changed my direct deposit so I was supposed to get my checks mailed I called my bank wells Fargo BTW and asked them if they could tell if my check went in and assuming they would send it back to the SSI office well today is the 4th and nothing has come in the mail..called SSi and they claim yes it was sent to my bank and NO they have not received anything back so as far as SSI is concerned they sent it Now my question is what can I do could I go into my local office and see if they can give me an emergency check if that even exist..MY rent was due on the 1st..I have to small children so please
    Any advise would be appreciated
    Thank you
    Annette Contreras

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Annette,

      You will not be able to get a replacement check until the money is returned. Keep checking with the bank and with Social Security about the whereabouts of the money. You might also check with local non-profits or churches to see if you can get a short-term loan to cover rent until the money is tracked down. Also, keep communicating with the landlord letting him know that the money is in limbo between SSA and the bank and it should be straightened out soon.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  19. Kiara says:

    Hello
    My name is Kiara and I was wondering about SSI
    for LD.
    I was diagnose with LD when i was 7 years old, I was placed on Special Ed and had resources classes throughout high school. Now, I am 24 years old still struggling and reasonally started college … My question is since my mom never applied for ssi when i was a child , and me now 24 could i apply even though i had an income that was around 36 hundred /year for 2years.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kiara,

      You can apply for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If you are unable to work, you will be eligible. Even if your income of $300 a month were continuing, it would be be low enough for you to receive benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  20. Barry says:

    My son in law has a disability and is on SSI,He is receiving benefits to his account in the bank, He just found out his father has been taking his SSI money from his account without permission what can be done to stop this?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Barry,

      Please provide some additional information so I can respond. Is your son-in-law’s father representative payee for your son-in-law’s benefits or is your son-in-law his own payee? Is his father’s name on the account in some manner such as a joint account?

      Thank you,
      Kay

  21. Pam says:

    My son is 49, has had a psychological assessment and is starting therapy for problems with ADD. He was evaluated when he was 6 and the diagnosis was ADHD but this is the first time, as an adult, that he has been willing to seek treatment, finally. He has had so many problems throughout his life and has never been able to hold a job. (He has walked off because of constant harassment or has been fired because of mistakes).

    He has never been able to maintain a relationship, has no money, no skills, no education, (barely graduated from High School), lives alone and has had serious problems with alcohol. He is probably agoraphobic and is on medicine for anxiety. His IQ is 80.

    I think he is mentally disabled, but we will find out more from the follow up from his assessment is complete. Is someone like my son eligible for disability and SS benefits. Thank you for your time.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Pam,

      Your son may be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. I suggest that he apply for SSI. He can either apply now or wait till the assessment has been completed so that a copy of the report can be submitted with the claim. The disadvantage of waiting is that SSI is not retroactive to months before application. The disadvantage of applying now (if the assessment won’t be completed for a couple months), is that he might be denied before the assessment has been completed. One approach could be for him to call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 to request an appointment to apply. The date of the call will be the application date, and it will likely be a few weeks or a month before the appointment, allowing time for the assessment.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  22. Jay says:

    Hello, My son is 24. He has never really worked. He was diagnosed with Schizophrenia in September. He has been in the hospital 3 times. Will he be able to receive SSI? If so, How do I get started? What do I need to get started? And should I let his case worker get it started for him?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jay,

      You can assist your son to file for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Start by calling Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 and requesting an appointment.If you are going to be assisting your son in the long run, it might be best for you to apply and ask the social worker for assistance if needed; though the decision is yours. Call this month to avoid possible loss of benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  23. Regina says:

    Hi, my question is more for applying for Social Security Disability. I have been diagnosed with Lymphedema, bilateral legs, lipodedma, factor 5, herniated lumbar disc, spinal stenosis, despression and severe anxiety disorder, sleeping disorder. Has anyone ever had these issues and applied for SSD. Any luck in getting approved. I retired earlier this year from my job on a Ordinary disabilty and have heard that the SSD process is more stringent in approving. Any comments would be appreciated. The waiting to hear is stressful. Thanks!

  24. samantha b says:

    Im 25, last time i worked was last year around this time November 2014.i was employed at that job for 2 and a half years. Ive basically been out of work for a year now. Seen a doctor finally. Doctor said i can start my disability claim and gave me paperwork. He diagnosed me with carpal tunnel. I did not file a workers comp claim cause it was barely occuring up before i wasn’t working anymore. Am i eligible to receive some sort of benefits? Doctor also advised me to not work cause i can damage my hands more..thoughts? Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Samantha,

      You may or may not be considered disabled under Social Security’s definition of disability, which also applies to Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. It will depend on whether your condition can be documented to have lasted twelve months or is expected to last twelve months. Is so, it will depend in part on your work history and whether you can perform any type of job you have done in the past, not just your last job, or a new jobs you could perform within the limitations on the use of your hands. For example, could you work as a ticket seller at a movie theater, where the use of hands is not labor intensive? I suggest you talk with your doctor and ask him or her to provide the limitations you have for use of your hands and an estimate of how long you will be limited. If any work is questionable, then file a claim.

      If you don’t have medical insurance for corrective surgery, you might apply for insurance under the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). The annual open enrollment period is in progress now through January 31. You can get more information at http://www.healthcare.gov.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  25. margo says:

    I was diagnosed with depression 2 years ago and was recently diagnosed with bipolar and anxiety what are my chances of getting approved for ssi or ssdi

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Margo,

      If you are unable to work because of the conditions you list and have been or are expected to be disabled for twelve months, you might be disabled according to Social Security Disability (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) law. For Social Security Disability you also have to have worked and earned enough quarters of coverage (work credits) in Social Security-taxed employment. For SSI, your (and your spouse’s) income and assets must be within the SSI limits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  26. MaryAnn says:

    Could you please help me with a question. I have not been able to work for years because I take care of my disabled daughter. Yet I have been diagnosed with a disabling disease. What are my chances of receiving benefits if I don’t qualify for social security?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear MaryAnn,

      If your income and assets are below the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) limits you may qualify for SSI disability benefits, which do not require a work history for U.S. citizens and some aliens.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  27. Daniel says:

    Thx for the information. Could you withdrawl an application online?

  28. Nom-Nom says:

    I was diagnosed with APS (antiphospholipid syndrome) in 2009 after 2 miscarriages and was told that my levels (IgG and IgM) were extremely high. The number was high enough that I was told that I would be on baby aspirins for the rest of my life. In 2010, I applied for disability and was denied, because SSA physicians were not familiar with my disease :(. However, I did not appeal their decision…at that time I did not want the “fight” and there is no way that I would have qualified for SSI. Then in 2012, I was told that I had beta thalassemia trait, which is deemed minor, after my daughter was diagnosed with the actual disease (beta thalassemia major is on the CAL list). And finally I was diagnosed with a heart murmur in 2014.

    During the year of 2014, I saw quite a few physicians (hematologist, cardiologist, general surgeon, internal medicine specialists and general physician), because my APS was taking a huge toll on my daily activities. It was so bad that my husband was placed on FMLA to care for me and our kids. Plus, my cardiologists had placed me on a heart monitor for 30 days. The FMLA ended in 02/2015, but could have been re-certified, but he left that job. So, I decided to reapply for disability, but was denied because I did not have enough work credits. Plus, the letter stated that they did not even take my medical issues into consideration because of the lack of credits. The SSA rep then scheduled a phone interview for SSI, which I had on 09/03/15. My rep was extremely nice and stated that we fit within the income guidelines.

    She saw that I was very detailed about every physician that I had seen and what I was experiencing. She then asked if I had any medical documents that showed that I had this issue prior to 2009, because if I did that I would then qualify for SSDI and they would have to go back that far for retroactive pay. I told her no and that the only thing I had was PCOS, which I was diagnosed with in 1999. At least she was trying and I was very appreciative. I also explained to her that my OB wants me to go in and have my levels checked and also have a host of tests to check my thyroid and hormone levels.

    My father suggested that “IF” approved that they would OWE me back pay for the initial application from 2010, but 09/03/15 was the first time I ever applied for SSI. Although, I explained to him that I did not believe that to be true…he insists that I am wrong. Should I be prepared to speak with an attorney or what do you think my odds are being approved for SSI (I also filed for my 3 year old who has HCBT)? Mind you…I reside in a state, MS, that is known to only approve a very low number of claims.

    • Nom-Nom says:

      I also meant to add that I had hernia surgery in November of last year and the doctor was very careful to make sure that he treated me with kid gloves due to the APS. <—Not sure that makes a difference at all!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Nom-Nom,

      I have insufficient information to know whether you are eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability. Your condition has apparently worsened since our first application, so you may have a better chance. Be sure to make a statement about the dates your husband was on FMLA to care for you and your child. If you are approved, benefits will be paid on your current application. (See my response to your prior post about your child’s application.)

      If you are denied, request a copy of your claim file and get an attorney involved and file a careful and thorough first appeal (reconsideration) hopefully to avoid having to appeal again. When you hire a Social Security attorney, you do not have to pay any legal fees up front and you will pay attorney fees only if you are approved for benefits. Social Security law sets the amount your attorney can charge and the Social Security Administration pays the attorney directly from the retroactive award before sending your back pay to you.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  29. sherry says:

    we live in VA how long do you have to be out of work to apply for disablity? My husband has a 12% rating through a 3rd party source of Workmans comp and we have settled back in May. He cannot return to his old job due to restrictions on his leg and per doctor and rating from the 3rd party source… He has been out of work for over 1 year. applied to over 300 places but will not hire him do to his leg restrictions…

    If he could find a job and he has been trying and gets hired will that disqualify him for future benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sherry,

      If your husband has the ability to work in some occupation with his leg restrictions, he will not be approved for disability benefits. Sometimes that is hard to determine. I suggest that he both try to get services from your state’s department of vocational rehabilitation to see whether there are occupations he can perform or can train to perform and simultaneously apply for Social Security Disability (SSD) to get their determination. SSD requires being disabled for twelve months.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  30. Daniel says:

    I have a question Kay. In October of 2014 I was ruled persitently or acutely disabled. Before that I applied for ssdi for a broken jaw which was denied. I filed an appeal. My question is could I cancel the appeal and then apply for ssi with my new diagnosis? I tried once and the office worker said my appeal included ssi. I really don’t want to wait a year until this appeal is answered to apply again.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Daniel,

      I don’t think you can file a second SSI claim when you have one pending and appeal without withdrawing your appeal, which could cause you to lose Social Security benefits. You should submit the new medical information you have to be considered as part of your appeal.

      You might also consult with a Social Security/SSI attorney about this. When you hire a Social Security attorney, you do not have to pay any legal fees up front and you will pay attorney fees only if you are approved for benefits. Social Security law sets the amount your attorney can charge and the Social Security Administration pays the attorney directly from the retroactive award before sending your back pay to you.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Daniel says:

        Thank you, I’ll look into getting an attorney. I’m not receiving benefits right now, so I’ll withdrawl. You did mean if I’m already receiving benefits correct?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Daniel,

          Yes, I meant if you are not receiving benefits; however, don’t withdraw an appeal without getting legal advice that satisfies you that doing so is most advantageous to you.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Daniel says:

            Yeah, I am not receiving benifets right now. I am going to withdrawl. I am pretty confident I could SSI after getting diagnosed acutely disabled. My first request, I wasn’t diagnosed. Hopefully it won’t take longer than 4 months :). Thank you so much for your advice.

          • Kay Derochie says:

            You are welcome, Daniel. Again, I suggest having a Social Security attorney look at the facts of your claim, your last insured date, etc. before you withdraw your appeal, just to be sure that you don’t disadvantage yourself in some way.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  31. justin says:

    Hi my father is legally blind he started receiving disability in 2004 I was 17 at the time and I had already dropped out of school but I had to get back in school to get my check from his disability so I did and I was approved and was supposed to get a lump sum for 4yrs but I ended up in jail for 8 yrs and I was wondering if there was anyway to at least get the lump sum that I was approved for

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Justin,

      If you were under age eighteen at the time the lump sum was processed for payment, the amount would have been paid to your father or mother. I suggest that you check with them first. If they did not receive the benefits, you might be able to claim the benefits that were payable for months before you were incarcerated. When you contact Social Security, explain that you are not filing a new claim, just following up on payment of dependent benefits that were due you before your were in prison.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  32. Michelle says:

    I qualify for ssdi now and will apply next month. I’m currently engaged and my fiance (not disabled, not a US citizen) is currently unemployed. If he finds a job how much can he earn before I become ineligible for ssdi?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Michelle,

      If you are eligible for SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance), your fiance’s (or husband’s if you marry) income will not affect your benefits. If you are eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), your fiance’s income should not affect your benefits; but if you are married, his income will be considered in determining your payment amount.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  33. JANICE SCHOENROCK says:

    My son is 29 we have a hearing coming up for him to get ssd we have medical records and doctors letter abut his disability. My question is if he
    represents himself what are his chances of getting approved for ssd?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Janice,

      Generally, it is better to have an experienced Social Security attorney involved in a hearings level appeal. Whether or not your son can successfully represent himself depends on several factors, among them how complicated his medical history is, how severely disabled he is, how articulate his is, how well he can analyze and respond on the spot, and how much he knows about Social Security law. If he decides to retain an attorney, he does not have to pay any legal fees up front and he will pay attorney fees only if he is approved for benefits. Social Security law sets the amount his attorney can charge and the Social Security Administration pays the attorney directly from the retroactive award before they send his back pay to him.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  34. aadkins says:

    I usually receive ssdi on the 3rd monthly & it is usually in my account when 1st. Is lands on sat/sun but it is not there! What /where happened/us it?
    #biskit911
    READ between the STARS & Ask yourself where is yours tonight?

    Paying Monthly BenefitsSSI (Supplemental Security Income) Benefits

    ☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆
    SSI benefits are paid of the 1st of the month. Unless the 1st falls on the weekend then the payments will be issued the Friday before the 1st.
    ☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆

    #biskit911

    RSDI (Retirement, Survivors and Disability) also referred to as SSA Benefits

    Since June 1997 SSA delivers recurring RSDI benefits on four days throughout the month on the 3rd of the month and on the second, third and fourth Wednesdays of the month. If the Wednesday regularly scheduled for payment delivery falls on a Federal legal holiday, benefits will be paid on the first preceding day that is not a Federal legal holiday. Beneficiaries entitled to benefits prior to May 1997 received recurring RSDI benefits on the 3rd of the month and continue to be paid on the 3rd of the month. With limited exclusions, RSDI beneficiaries who filed claims on or after May 1, 1997, are assigned one of the three new payment dates based on their day of birth. All beneficiaries on a record will have the same payment day (the day of the birth of the person the Social Security number belongs to will decide the payment day) as follows.

    Payment DaysDay of BirthAssigned Payment Day1st – 10thSecond Wednesday of the month11th – 20thThird Wednesday of the month21st – 31stFourth Wednesday of the month

     

    View the Schedule of Social Security Benefit Payments for 2011 and 2012.

     

    FOIA Glossary Privacy Report Fraud, Waste or Abuse Site Map Website Policies

    http://www.socialsecurity.gov/kc/rp_paybenefits.htm

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Adkins,

      My response is based on the assumption that you have not recently changed bank account numbers. If you do not receive payment by Tuesday morning, I suggest that you contact your bank to see if there is a crediting problem. If not, then I suggest that you call Social Security to report non-receipt.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  35. Teresa says:

    Hi, I am currently receiving a a small check which was $866. Then a hundred and something was taken out for Medicare benefits for major depression and back pain. I had more issues going on but my last doctor refuse to listen to me.she said it was all in my head. After receiving my check. I explained everything to the new doctor did test and found out my pain was not in my head, I have 2 bulging disk and arthritis in my lower back, rhumatoid arthritis in my hands, osteoarthritis in my my hips. A hiatal hernia in my stomach /chest about to have surgery . Possible Pneuropathy in my feet. I have had 5 eye surgeries. My check is being cut a hundred and something for Medicare benefits. I pay bills and have to make partial payments on some. Need more test done but don’t have the money to give up front for the test. Do I qualify for more benefits.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Teresa,

      Tell me what state you live in and I will let you know whether you might be eligible for a small amount of SSI that might qualify you for Medicaid, which could have lower or no co-pays for medical services. Also, I suggest that you try applying for Medicaid directly at your state’s social services office. With your low income, you might qualify. If you do, in addition to having prescription coverage and likely lower co-pays, Medicaid typically pays your Medicare premium for you.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Brittany says:

        Hey I work full time. I have 7 year old twins. My son is disabled but my daughter isn’t. He just got approved for ssi at 733. I live in Georgia. I just got a letter. I think they have my old wages from when he got ssi before. Cause I make way more than I did. I use to make 600 a month. Now I make 1853 a month with two kids. I want to know also will this effect my sons benefits or what??

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Brittany,

          Your son should still be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), but perhaps not for the full $733. I suggest that you hold off on using any of the money you received for him and take to Social Security all your pay stubs for all pay days beginning with the month you filed the application. Explain that the benefits were calculated on incorrect wages.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  36. Kaddi says:

    I am receiving a small disability check $866.00 per month for Vascular EDS. I was born with this genetic disease and pushed to work despite times I was bedridden with small strokes, aneurysms, and other health issues related to the EDS. I didn’t work enough to get more credits. I am married and my husband still works to help with my medical expenses and once he retires it is going to be even more difficult. I am currently working about 10 to 12 hours a week earning an additional $600 a month. I am losing my eyesight. Totally blind in the left eye and double vision in my right eye. I can not drive any more and it is becoming more and more difficult to do my job without the double vision becoming more distorted. There are tears in the eye tissue adding black spider webs in the vision with lightning bolts…and I am not a candidate for surgery. I am having to depend on others to help me. My question is….can I earn more disability benefits for being legally blind?
    Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kaddi,

      Your disability benefits will not go up if you become legally blind. The amount you can earn and still be considered disabled increase from $1,090 gross wages to $1,820; however, you must apply for and get a formal Social Security determination of legal blindness to qualify for the higher benchmark.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  37. Pam says:

    Hi, right now I have to work to make ends meet, but there are days which is every other day I can’t even walk from my car to my house and need help. I don’t want to stop working until I know I will get the income from SSID to help me and I will stop working but for now its hard for me to do so. Can I still qualify for it?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Pam,

      If you are earning $1,090 or more gross wages in a month, you are not considered disabled under Social Security law. It takes two to five months for new claims to be processed and the first five full calendar months of disability are not paid. I suggest that you check with your employer to find out whether you are covered by a company short-term disability policy that will benefits while your Social Security claims is being processed.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  38. muna says:

    Hi i have a chronic back pain and have nt been working for 4yrs, am i eligible for ssi. The only income i have is welfare cash of 350 and 194 in food stamps

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Muna,

      You appear to be financially eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If you were working steadily for the five or six years before you stopped work, you might also be insured for Social Security Disability (SSDI).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Debbie says:

      I recieve $1,400. per month for child support arrears owed to me dating back from 1998 till Oct. 2014. My estranged spouse agreed to go to notary and we both signed notarized agreement for this amount to be paid to me for the next 2 1/2 yrs. even though our two sons are now 18 & 21. My ex stated that he would only pay me this much of the thousands he owes me in back support if I (mom) #1 waived all rights to current and future alimony and any marital assets; #2 the amount of 1400. will only be paid to me for 2 1/2 yrs..
      With this said, and desperately running away from a very abusive, retaliating spouse who’d even been arrested for shooting a fire arm and threatening my children and mine lives when I left him years ago (he always said he’d have us taken care of if we left him, but I ran with our sons who were probably 3 & 6 at the time) and, well, I do not actually want to put up the fight to gain much more from him bcs I’m scared to, I’m scared to do anything to make this 1400. go away and my youngest (18 now) and myself depends on this voluntary notarized child support arrears agreement because without it our only alternative would be us on the streets and homeless. Our only other resource is the $127. per month we get in food stamps. We have to pay $1,000. per month for the rent. After all utilities, we haven’t even enough to buy shampoo, and the $31 per week (foodstamps) is NOT enough for me and my son to eat with. We live in a low-income area. I own nothing, not one thing of value, unless a sofa and bed or dining table is to be counted. We know what it’s like to have nothing but a floor and an air mattress (church donated when someone reported us in a home with nothing but the roof and walls to shelter us. Like I said, I just took off with our sons in the middle of the night in a car and we never looked back. It was either that or my ex was going to kill me, or worse my kids. So, each year I am DENIED because every time I apply for SSI I am told that the child-support arrears I currently recieve ($1,400. per month) is too be counted as my income even though it’s meant for the kids and is actually back pay for those years. I was told because of my medical diagnoses, that I would qualify for the medical side of SSI, however, that 1400. child-support arrears is to be counted as my unearned income and so now I cannot qualify. My 18 year old has been diagnosed for years with severe marfan’s syndrome and all the deformities and heart complications that come along with it, as well as but not limited to, pectin excavatum, gerds, severe chronic ulcers, esophageal and gastrointestinal polyps, gastrointestinal diseases, scoliosis, tinnitus, chronic skin infections, etc…., etc….. Still told that these arrears (unearned income) denies either of us getting any SSI. CAN THIS BE THE TRUTH? My diagnoses is not much better. I have LUPUS (no cure & autoimmune), auto peripheral neuropathy, fibromyalgia, severe chronic ulcers, gastrointestinal disease, gerds, have cancerous cells/cysts (currently benign), pericarditis, ventricular thrombosis, and much, much worse. AND I AM STILL TOLD THAT the 1400. child-support arrears still make me UNQUALIFY, even though this is the unearned, and only source of income my sick son and I have to live off of. We currently get medicaid, however, ours does not pay for everything, so I guess you have to recieve welfare to get the 100% medicaid. With this said, my son’s pain mngmt. Doctor has diagnosed and prescribed him needing Life-Long physical therapy, at which they do what they call a “manipulation of the bones”, which means they forcibly apply pressure to his body to force his bones to move where they should be, otherwise, and note that it’s pretty bad, but, his bone deformities look like trees braves branching outwards where ever they desire to go, so this causes his bones to crush his lungs, his heart, etc… His hips, legs randomly displace themselves, which my son just pops them b c k in place himself. He’s in alot of pain. Hell, we both are. We are still denied SSI and of course we cannot physically work. Our weekly routines are the same. We spend each week day at physical therapy, pain management, cardiologist, gastroenterologist, neurologist, rheumatologist, etc… all week, every week, all month and every year. My son looses his medicaid once he turns 19 in 3 months. Why and how can SSI deny us like this????

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Debbie,

        The child support cannot be counted as both your income and your adult child’s income. It has to be one or the other. It may be correct that it is being counted as yours because the children are now grown and it is being paid to you. Accordingly, your son should apply for SSI now that he is age eighteen and your income will not affect his financial eligibility. I believe that the most income that he could have is $264 in-kind (non-cash) support and maintenance from you in the form of free housing. If I am correct, he would be eligible for $489 a month SSI.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  39. Justin says:

    I am a disabled veteran. I am currently rated at the 70% for mental disorders through the VA, and collecting SSDI. My wife has been urged to leave her job and provide full time care for me. If she were to quit her job, would we qualify for SSI. We would not be able to survive on my VA and SSDI pensions alone. Also, what are the reportable incomes required for application.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Justin,

      If your VA compensation and SSDI combined exceed $732 a month, you will not be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Some states have an SSI state supplement. If you tell me the state you live in, I may be able to tell you whether your own income is too high for state supplement payment. You might check with your state social services to find out whether they have a program that compensates relative caretakers, and you could inquire whether or disability income would allow eligibility for food stamps.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  40. Judy Hall says:

    I started receiving SSD and SSI April 2013. I received a check in Jan 2013 from a life insurance policy of my mothers after she passed. I had just applied for disability in December 2012 so did not expect to get disability for quite some time if ever. But in April just before I started receiving disability and SSI and they asked me if I had any income. I didn’t think at the time to mention the Ins. check. Now 2 yrs later IRS told them I had income in 2013 which I understand and I was trying to figure what it was because I knew I had not worked. I had used the check from Ins to live on while waiting for Disability decision. SS is saying they paid me back to Dec. 2012 so the check I got will now have to be deducted from my SSI. I didn’t know I was gonna get SSI and I had to pay my bills while waiting what can I do to keep from them taking the $90 per month fornext 6 years? I only get $909 right now so I need every penny to live. Please Help! They want a list of everything I spent the money on and i do not remember. Also I have been getting free food from a non profit to help because I do not have enough for food and they want letter from nonprofit as to when I started receiving food and how much the worth of food was. Geezzz When you are on limited income you have to get food from other places like food banks etc. Can they do that? If that is the case then every person getting SSI should of claimed the food bank food or any other free food..

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Judy,

      The information you provide is a bit confusing. Your reference to a collection rate of $90 makes it sound as if the overpayment amount has been determined and is under collection, but the requests for proof of how you spent the inheritance and proof of the value of free food sounds as if the overpayment amount has not yet been determined or you are appealing the calculation. Also, I am unclear about whether you are now getting only Social Security or you live in a state that has an SSI state supplement. Please clarify these points. With more information, I might be able to provide some suggestions about the overpayment.

      Your Social Security benefit is not affected by the inheritance or free food. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is intended to supplement other sources of income and to provide shelter and food. If you have free shelter or free food, its value is countable income.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  41. Katina Grow says:

    Hi,I have a difficult question to asked.We live in Germany on military orders. My husband works as a DOD civilien on a base in Wiesbaden.We have a son who is mentally disabled and also has a seizure disorder.He will be 18 in the summer and my question is ,can he qualify for SSI.I know he would in the states.I know you are not eligible when you live overseas,but we are here on orders and you would think he would have the same rights like somebody who is living in the states.Thanks for your help Katina.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Katina,

      I believe that only minor children of military families living abroad can receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Once your child turns eighteen, he is an adult and must meet the eligibility requirements for an adult. You can read about SSI for individuals abroad at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/ssi/spotlights/spot-military-overseas.htm. You can also double check the information I am giving with the Social Security Administration.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  42. jesse says:

    My reasons for writing have been a confusing and ngoing battle…
    So first of all i was Approved for SSDI after 4 years…my backpay totalled to 36 grand and after winning my attorney received her chunk of money as fast as lightning…it took them months just to get 2600 dollars to me and a letter saying i woild get a check every six months for my backpay as if i was on SSI..but i should be getting paid in one lump sum…i am broke 1000 a month isnt enough to support 3 kids and pay rent buy food clothing bills and everything else…i need atleast half of my backpay to survive what do i do?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jesse,

      Now that your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim has been processed, your SSDI will move to being paid, including the back pay, which usually takes about two to three months. You could try to request expedited handling by the payment center based on financial hardship, but so many are in your situation that I don’t believe it has much impact. While you wait, you might check with your local social services office to see if your family qualifies for SNAP (food stamps) or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  43. Sandy says:

    Hi. I had applied for disability more than 120 days ago and have not heard a word. Now what??? Also would like to no if I can sell my home since I am unable to take the steps, and do all the upkeep in it. Thank you. It is nice to own a home but not if it has become a danger.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sandy,

      If you applied for Social Security Disability (SSDI), selling your home will have no impact on your eligibility for benefits. If you applied for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and do not reinvest the proceeds from the sale of your home into the purchase of another home within three months of the sale, all the proceeds from the sale will count toward the $2,000 asset limit beginning with the month after the month of the sale. If you move, be sure to notify Social Security and the Disability Determination Services (DDS) of your new address.

      As far as the status of your claim, you can call the claims examiner at DDS and inquire whether they need anything from you or your medical providers.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  44. Rachel says:

    Kay,

    My husband has been on short term disability for the past 11 months and is expected to be out for an additional 12 months or more. I am very stressed about what will happen when those payments end as we will most likely foreclose our home. We submitted the online social security disability application last week however I am concerned about the time frame before he becomes accepted. I am unclear about the income requirements as well as we are not a low income family however are truly struggling to make ends meet. My questions are:
    1.) does my income affect my husband’s social security long term disability (he has not worked in 11 months and only income is short term disability)
    2.) what is the average time to find out whether or not he is accepted?
    3.) if accepted, how long does he wait to get a check?
    4.) will the 5 month waiting period be “waived” as he began his disability 11 months ago?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rachel,

      1. You income does not affect your husband’s Social Security Disability (SSDI)claim. If he is not receiving workers compensation or certain disability retirement benefits from a public employer, his income does not affect SSDI benefits.
      2. It usually takes two to five months for an initial decision. Be sure to submit everything possible for this first claim. Get all his records and list the short-term disability insurance carrier as a source of information.
      3. It typically takes a month or more to have the monthly benefits start. Back pay can take another three months.
      4. The five-month unpaid waiting period starts with the month after he became disabled.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  45. sky says:

    if im not eliglble to draw ssd but was deened disable by them then will i be found disable for ssi

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sky,

      If you are found disabled but your Social Security is denied because you do not have enough work credits in the right period of time and your income and assets are below the SSI limits, you will be eligible for SSI because the disability requirements are the same as for Social Security.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • mary says:

      My son was recently denied ssd, his attorney suggested he file for ssi aren’t the qualifications the same? and also is Cirrhosis a qualifying medical condition?

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Mary,

        If your son was denied Social Security Disability (SSD) because it was determined that he is not disabled, then he is not medically eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and, if he disagrees, he can appeal. If he was denied because he was not insured (did not have enough work credits), then he might be eligible for SSI. Disability can arise from cirrhosis; it depends on how severe and limiting the condition is.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  46. Jacqueline Brown says:

    My letter from hearing Judge came I was awarded a approve letter my husband works full time an nothing is taken from check we file our taxes an it all comes out then will his working get me denied at SSI AN NOT GO WITH Judges favorable decision??

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jacqueline,

      The judge’s decision is related only to whether you are disabled and when you became disabled. If you were approved for Social Security Disability (SSDI), your husband’s earnings do not affect your claim. If your approval was for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), to receive benefits your family’s assets and income have to be below a certain level. You will be asked to update your finances before SSI benefits can be started. Declare your husband’s income and provide the rest of the financial and living-arrangement information that is requested. Social Security will figure out whether you qualify financially.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  47. Kira says:

    My daughter is 3.5 and she gets SSI for several reason (cp, epilepsy, perventricular leukomacia, cerebral folate deficiency, asthma, g-tube, calcium deficiency). I do not work because its hard to find employment that will accommodate me taking off to take my daughter to 6 therapy appointments aweek in addition to doc appointments, so I was thinking about gettibg a roomate to offset rent but unsure how that will effect her ssi. Are there any additiobal resources, we currently get SNAP.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kira,

      If your roommate pays only a third of the rent and utilities, it will not affect your daughter’s SSI. The roommate could also buy non-shelter supplies for the household such as paper and soap products and it would not affect the SSI check. Some areas have non-profits that offer energy assistance to pay heating bills. You could apply to get on a waiting list for government-subsidized housing. You might also check to see if your state pays relatives to care for disabled family members.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  48. tyson says:

    And I applied for disability I worked also so will I get social security disability or ssi I have kids so will they get a check nd I pay child.support will they.deduct from my check?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tyson,

      Please see my reply to your previous inquiries. If your children get Social Security dependent benefits, you may be able to go to court and get your child support order reduced.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  49. tyson says:

    It’s been 60 days I still have not received my award letter I keep calling the social security office they say still pending how much longer you think it will be my lawyer said I won full benefits just waiting for my letter?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tyson,

      The guideline for the judge’s decision is sixty days but it often takes longer. You can call the hearing office to find out where the appeal is in the process–with the judge for a decision or in letter writing.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  50. Kathy Goedde says:

    Any responses that you had has been removed as well. Again, there is no way to sue anyone these days, so the hospitals are getting off Scott free. This heinous assault happened 9 years ago, so I still can’t get a job. Without a job I can’t get unemployment. I don’t qualify for ssdi, I don’t the have the money for more half witted doctors anyway, who are still trying to take my home for that assault. My teeth are almost gone and very painful and 9 discs were damaged because of the unnecessary and over medicated with Forsamax in the hospital.
    I’ve gone through governmental agency to agency and they take more money for no decent employment. I’m so very sorry for your website, now you know why the labeled disabled need someone who cares about decent employment not more fraud.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kathy,

      Your posts and my answers can be found under the articles where you posted each of your comments. (You have posted under three different articles.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  51. Kathy Goedde says:

    Sorry, I’ve been cut off again. Any advice?

  52. william faust says:

    hi there. I currently receive ssd. I get 905.00 a month, which after rent, utilities, and food, leaves nothing else. am I eligible for ssi? my son, 11 years old, receives a monthly check at 260.00 a month, his mother is the payee and uses it to pay for his aftercare. he has been diagnosed with adhd and mild autism, is he eligible for anything? we are divorced and he spends equal time with both of us.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear William,

      You might look into SNAP (food stamp) benefits for yourself. If you son is disabled, his mother can apply for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for him. She will have to explain the split living arrangement and the Social Security Administration (SSA) will determine which parent’s income is to be considered in determining financial eligibility for SSI, which has income and asset limits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  53. ryan ash says:

    Hi I’m Ryan ash I was wondering about . I’m 21 years old and my fiancee is 19 if we got married Wats happens if I tell social security??? And she get ssi and ssa and wat about we have a child does our income increase or what happens

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ryan,

      If you and your fiancee, who receives Social Security (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI), get married, your income will be considered in determining whether she continues to be eligible for SSI. If you and she has a child and her Social Security family maximum is higher than her Social Security benefit, dependents benefits will be payable for the child. Your financee can learn the amount of her family maximum by calling Social Security at 1-800-772-1213.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  54. tiffany maltsberger says:

    I have applied for ssi for.my six year old daughter she has been diagnosed with adhd and intellectual functioning and a sever learning disability. The school says she is two years behind emationaly and in.school. they have her in sse classes and is having totores in class. She is being treated for adhd and was diagnosed three mounths ago but she is two years behind.I was wandering if she can get up teo years back or from when I applied and was wandering if my case is strong. Her iq score is 73. She also has a speach disprder as well. Just wanting to know what my daughter may get back. Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tiffany,

      Your daughter may be approved for SSI If she is, her benefits will begin the month after you applied, unless you applied on the first of the month in which case benefits will begin with the month of application.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  55. sue kaeske says:

    Is there such a thing as a survivor benefit for the wife of a disabled person after his death, when she is 59 years old?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sue,

      Widow’s benefits based on age begin at age sixty. At that age benefits are reduced. Full widow’s benefits are available at full retirement age. Disabled widow’s benefits that are reduced more than those based on age and can potentially begin at age fifty. Lastly, if the widow has in her care a child of the disabled worker and the child is under age sixteen, mother’s benefits are payable.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  56. Robin says:

    I have applied for SSDI, as well as SSI. Do you know which one will be approved first?

    Thank you,

    Robin

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Robin,

      The medical decision will be made for both the SSDI and SSI claims at the same time. Usually SSI is paid first.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  57. Robert says:

    Hi Kay,

    I am a disable vet at 30% requesting additional compensation since it had gotten worse I am currently being treated/tests for my Hip/femur at the VA Hospital. I just filed SSD at 49 yrs old (worked my 31 yrs) they will accessed all my medical records which proves my chronic condition. What are my chances getting approved? They want to do a hip replacement which I am very frightened since I have been under the knife in the past. I remember I have 1500 appx on SS Statement online what will my two kids get ? $2250 150% ?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Robert,

      To learn the amount that your children will receive, you need to know the amount of your family maximum. The largest family maximum for high earners is 180% of the primary insurance amount. Your family maximum is likely to be 150% or less. If it is 150%, you will receive $1,500 and the total the children will receive for both (not each) is $750. You can request an earnings statement (not a benefit statement) online at http://www.ssa.gov or by calling 1-800-772-1213. It will give you an estimated amount of your family maximum.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Robert says:

        Morning Kay,

        I learned by last statement was at $1500 if I retired but since I applied for SSDI it does not show the amount at all. I already called I guess i will wait. But my other question since I am a disable Vet will that work in my favor in a expedited processing ? Thank you.

        By the way you have no idea how people feel appreciative of your responses with compassion and precise answers.

        Thank you, again. I read all your posts. :)

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Robert,

          I am glad that I can be of service.

          If the $1,500 retirement-benefit quote is the amount you will receive at full retirement age, then it is also the approximate amount you will receive if you are approved for Social Security Disability. Vets who are recently disabled and are returning from combat are eligible for expedited processing. I am not sure special processing is available for other vets. It is certainly worth checking with Social Security to see if your claim qualifies to be expedited.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  58. TJ says:

    I an 60. I had to quit work to be a fulltime caregiver for my spouse, a veteran, who became disabled due to lyme disease. His symptoms are much like agent orange disease, however we have not filed a claim with the va in fear of complicating his ssdi. He has been sick for about 20 years. I am having severe back problems and now fear I may need some financial help if my spouse passes away. He is 65.
    Who should I contact about possible disability for myself or should I look into caregiver income of some kind? I worked for 25yrs before having to quit, but do not have any pension. We’re in Oregon.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear TJ,

      If your husband is receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI), at age sixty-two, you can receive reduced wife’s benefits. If he passes away, you are now old enough to be eligible for reduced widow’s benefits. You do not say how long ago you stopped working. If you worked enough in the last ten years and believe that you would not be able to work even if you were not caring for your husband than it would be appropriate to apply for SSDI for yourself. You might not qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability if your husband’s SSDI is substantial.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

    • Cheryl says:

      apply with VA my father died from lung cancer agent orange and my mother was retroed back from time he applyed, and still receives check from VA as well as SS now

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Cheryl,

        It looks as if the first part of your post is missing. Please re-post your whole question.

        Thanks,
        Kay

  59. Mike says:

    I have a friend who is on SSI and receives a small retirement sum from a deceased husband . She is now 68 years old and received a letter from Social Security to determine if she is still eligible for SSI, I know that SSDI reverts to retirement benefits when a person hits full retirement age. Does SSI revert to retirement benefits too or does it change to something else when full retirement age is reached ? She has never worked due to a seizure disorder.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mike,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) does not change when an individual reaches full retirement age unless full retirement age results in the receipt of increased or new income.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  60. Charles says:

    I been on Supplemental Security Income for twenty years can I apply for Social Security Disability?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Charles,

      If you have not worked in the past twenty years, you are not insured for Social Security Disability. When you reach retirement age, you can apply for Social Security Retirement. If you have enough work credits from before becoming disabled you may be eligible.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  61. Michelle says:

    Hi
    My husband just exhausted his SDI benefits following two knee replacement surgeries, and a rotator cuff repair, all done within one year. Would he be eligible for SDI benefits again in the future if he had a different claim, and how long would he need to wait if so? If he returned to work part time would that hamper near future efforts to get SSI?
    Thanks

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Michelle,

      If your husband has been off work for a full twelve months, he can apply for a closed period of disability even if he goes back to work full time. If he receives Social Security Disability (SSDI) and returns to work part-time after being off work for a year, he might qualify for a trial work period during which SSDI disability benefits would continue. SSI (Supplemental Security Income) has some different rules about return to work in that there are income limits to receive SSI. I suggest that your husband contact California SDI office for specifics on how long he has to be back to work to be eligible for a new period of disability.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  62. Renee Villano says:

    Hi I have been on ssd since 2008 due to renal disease and I also get a check for my daughter under me but she is autistic and I guess when she turns 18 she will get her own now my husband has had 5 heart attacks and now just got diagnosed with lung cancer I don’t know what to do can he get emergency disablity but if he leaves his job he will lose his medical benefits and life insurance policy and if he quits doesn’t he have to wait to get approved and the wait 2 year’s for the Medicare so how can he keep working with all these horrible diagnoses

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Renee,

      Three months before your daughter turns eighteen, if she is unmarried, she can apply for disabled adult child benefits on your Social Security earnings record (and on her father’s if he is receiving disability benefits at that time.)

      As far as your husband’s situation goes, perhaps he can go on a medical leave of absence which would allow continuation of medical benefits and life insurance. When his benefits terminate, he will have the right to either continue his benefits under COBRA (if his employer is large enough to be subject to that law). He would have to pay the premiums which are quite high. Another option would be to apply for insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) also known as Obamacare. This must be done right after the other health insurance ends. The government will subsidize payment of premiums under the ACA if your income is low enough, which it might be when your husband stops working. Also, he should check to see if he is covered under a short-term or long-term disability policy through his employer that might cover some or all of the first five months he is off work during which Social Security is not payable.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sin

  63. Mercedes says:

    Hi,

    I need help. I was on disability for about 2 years on March 2010 I went back to work and have been working since but I had to leave my first job because it was to straining. I went through the trial work period and continued working. In 2012, I discovered a condition in my back that can only get better with surgery but it is not positive that I would. I also have lymphedema and am over weight which makes the back surgery harder and can cause complications I do not want. My condition is lymphedema and will never get better can just get treatment through therapy to learn to live with it. (that’s what got me on disability, extreme swelling of the legs.) Now the last year and a half I’ve been doing private duty care but my back is getting worse. There are days I do can not get out of bed because of the pain. I recently got a letter saying that since I’ve been working since 2010 I am no longer disabled by there terms. The thing is it is getting harder each day and will need to get on disability soon. How hard will it be for me to get approved and since I was on disability before can I receive a check rather rapidly or will I have to wait again? Is there a way to speed up the process and how should I go about it?

    Thanks,
    Mercedes

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mercedes,

      You exhausted all the work incentives under your prior claim and your claim has been closed, as the letter you received indicated. This means that you will have to file a new claim and have a new disability review. If your condition has not improved and if you are not performing substantial gainful activity, which in part means not earnings $1,070 gross wages or net self-employment income, your claim is likely to be approved. The processing will not be expedited and you will have a new five-month unpaid waiting period before benefits start.

      Best regards,

      Kay

  64. secnarf says:

    I get a check because my husband get disability . Well I also get back pay

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Secnarf,

      If you are eligible on your husband’s record, you will be eligible for benefits for the same months he is eligible including past months.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  65. Travis says:

    I receive SSI and I live with my father is on Disability… If he gets remarried will my SSI change?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Travis,

      If you are age eighteen or older, your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will not change because your father gets married. If you are under age eighteen, your new stepmother’s income and assets have to be considered in determining your eligibility and the marriage should be reported to Social Security.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  66. Gary says:

    Hi,I recently started receiving SSDI from a work related injury I received in Nov.of 2012.
    Because it was work related, my SSDI was cut from about 1350 a month to 850 per month,plus 456 weekly from workmanship Comp.
    My question is how much per month(if any) is my dependent daughter legible to receive? Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Gary,

      If your family maximum is high enough, your daughter’s unreduced benefit would be half of your unreduced benefit, that is, $675. However, usually workers comp offset is applied first to dependents Social Security benefits. Therefore, when her benefits start the $456 offset may be applied to her benefit in the future instead of yours.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  67. Danny says:

    Thanks Kay

  68. Randy says:

    Hi Kay,

    Is there any downside from applying to SSD? I have been on STD for 5 months now and benefits will end in one more month. I returned to work at partial time to rehabilitate myself, but it’s been a struggle to work. I wanted to avoid applying for LTD because I don’t know the long term consequences of being on LTD (future jobs, credit history, etc..) and whether taking SSD early on may affect future retirement benefits. Hopefully I will be able to go back to work full time within a year.

    Thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Randy,

      If you expect to be disabled or partially disabled for less than a year, you will not qualify for Social Security Disability (SSDI). However, if you were to be eligible for SSDI, it would not have a negative effect on your Social Security retirement benefit. Until you know how long you will be off, I encourage you to apply for long-term disability (LTD) if you qualify. There is no reason I can see that it would have a negative effect on credit history nor any reason why it would have any more negative effect on future employment than receiving short-term disability. Having said all that, I suggest that you talk with your human resource or benefits department to find out whether stopping work again will have any effect on your current employment status and medical insurance.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  69. Danny says:

    Thank you for this website!

    I haven’t filed tax returns for several years partly due to my income being under the required threshold and partly due to a great loss of memory.
    Question #1: Do I have to get caught up on these filings prior to applying for or receiving SSI/SSDI?

    I’m 62 years old, had a stroke, broken legs, fractured spine, can’t walk and I’m clinically blind. I live alone and have no family. I’ve been selling personal belongings to get by for the last 3 years but that’s quickly coming to an end.

    Last year I had an appointment at the local Social Security office where the lady asked several questions about my employment history, income, past doctors, every illness & medication and injury I’ve ever had – none of which I could answer. She handed me a packet to fill out and another packet came in the mail a few days later.
    That packet asked the very same questions but with more detail. I tried to answer those questions too, but with no luck. I can’t remember who I worked for let alone the dates.

    I’ve worked self employed in the construction industry most all my life and have had several dozen regular employers too. I got flustered with all the questions and I think I threw the paperwork away. Then a denial came in the mail and I maybe tossed that too.

    Q#2: Does the SSA have my work history already?
    Q#3: Will you please point me in the right direction? Maybe someone or agency who can help piece my history together?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Danny,

      You have a few options open to you, but it sounds as if you could use some help in taking advantage of them. Many communities have senior assistance agencies who could help you file the appropriate applications. Start by contacting a state or county department of health and human services or a senior center. If you are legally blind, the Commission for the Blind in your state can probably help you with your application.

      Because you are not working, it could be to your advantage to apply for reduced retirement benefits now that you are are sixty-two. Hopefully, you have had enough employment over your lifetime working for others or in years that you did file self-employment tax returns to have enough work for retirement benefits. The paperwork for a retirement claim is less complicated than for disability and takes less time to process.

      You might also apply for Social Security Disability (SSD) which is paid at a higher rate than reduced Social Security Retirement but requires sufficient work earnings and credits in the ten years before your disability began. Social Security has your work history in sufficient detail to determine whether or not you have enough work credits. It does not have a record of the kinds of jobs you held and what those jobs required. When you apply for retirement, let Social Security know the date when you became disabled and they can tell you whether or not you are insured for SSD. At the same time you can apply for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), which has no work history requirement.

      You could either engage an attorney to help you complete the disability paperwork or try to find a local senior agency to help you. You might also tell the Social Security claims representative that you are not able to complete the forms on your own and would like to have them help you complete them. Often, if a person sits down and talks about it, with a little prompting, he will remember more than he thinks he does. You might also talk with family or friends and get them to write down where you worked and what you did on the job. Lastly, you minimally need a list of the doctors and hospitals who are treating you know and, if possible, who treated since you became disabled.

      Best regards,

      Kay

    • pam says:

      Hi,
      Our son is 20 years old and living with us right now. Due to chronic lyme disease he has neurological and mental issues that will not allow him to work. This started in high school and he has not been able to hold down a job. He has agoriphobia and severe anxiety disorders. He has been treated for past year but prognosis looks dim right now. Would he qualify for benefits and if so how much could he get?

      Thanks,
      Pam

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Pam,

        Your son may be eligible for benefits. He can start an application by calling Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 and asking for an appointment to apply for SSI. He should take with him a list of all the doctors that have treated him back to when he was in high school and a list of any tests he’s had and where they were performed. If you are his father are receiving Social Security benefits or his father is deceased, you son should also apply for disability adult child benefits on the earnings record of his parent.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

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