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Why do I have to give information about my family’s income and assets when I apply for SSI benefits?

By   /  March 3, 2016  /  82 Comments

Learn why Social Security asks about your family’s income when you apply for SSI benefits & see how family income and resources affect SSI eligibility.

apply-for-ssi-benefitsThe Reason Why

When you apply for SSI benefits, the Social Security Administration requests information about your family’s and certain other people’s income and assets. They do this because part of their income and resources may be considered available to you and may factor in determining whether you meet the financial qualifications for SSI Disability payments.

Deemed Income

Deemed income is the portion of an ineligible spouse’s, an ineligible parent’s or an ineligible step-parent’s, a sponsor’s, or an essential person’s income that is considered or “deemed” to be available to an SSI-eligible spouse, SSI-eligible child, SSI-eligible sponsored non-citizen, or SSI-eligible individual who is receiving a payment increment for an Essential Person. Deemed income is included in calculating whether an individual meets the SSI income requirements.

Deemed Resources

Deemed resources is the portion of an ineligible spouse’s, an ineligible parent’s, an ineligible step-parent’s, a sponsor’s, or an essential person’s assets that are deemed available to the SSI-eligible individual. Deemed resources are included in calculating whether an individual’s resources are below the SSI resource limit.

The Idea Behind Deemed Income and Resources

SSI law presumes that members of a family unit are financially responsible for one another when they live in the same household. Accordingly, they consider or “deem” that a portion of certain family members’ income and assets are available to the SSI recipient. Similarly, they consider the sponsor of non-citizen immigrant to be responsible for the financial welfare of the person sponsored and deem the sponsor’s income and assets to the sponsored alien applicant. For these reasons, when you apply for SSI benefits, you must provide proofs of your family’s and/or, sponsor’s income and resources.

How Deemed Income Is Calculated

To learn how SSA determines the amount of income and resources that will be deemed to you from your spouse, visit our article “What are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect SSI Payment Amount and Qualifying for SSI Disability?” To see how SSA calculates income and resources deemed from a parent to an SSI-eligible child, visit our article “What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect an SSI Application for Children?” Find out about deeming to sponsored noncitizens in our article “How Can a Noncitizen Go About Qualifying for SSI Disability?” Deeming from an Essential Person is discussed in “What Do I Need to Know About Qualifying for SSI Disability with an Essential Person?

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  • Published: 11 months ago on March 3, 2016
  • By:
  • Last Modified: December 5, 2016 @ 7:41 pm
  • Filed Under: SSI
  • Dear E. J.,

    Because you are separated from your husband, his income and assets should not count in determining your eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If he is giving you money, the money would count as income in determining your payment amount.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • You are welcome, Mickey.

  • Dear Tori,

    Your boyfriend’s income should not be deemed to your son because you are not married. (Some states recognize common law marriages where no ceremony takes place; however, these require that you consider yourselves married and tell the public that you are married.)

    If you live in the same household with your boyfriend and do not contribute both your share and your son’s share of the shelter expenses and food (apparently you share food with your boyfriend), then your son will be charged with countable income for receiving in-kind (non-cash) support and maintenance. Each of your shares–yours and your son’s–is the total expenses divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

    If you have not gotten a formal decision, try submitting a statement signed by you and your boyfriend that you are not married and do not tell anyone that you are and that he is not the father or your child and, therefore, his income should not be considered in determining your son’s eligibility.

    Add to the statement that you are paying part of the shelter and food costs for yourself and your son. Include in the statement the total amount you pay for your son’s and your shelter and food and how much the total food and shelter expenses are for everyone. If you are paying enough to be both your and your son’s shares, include in the statement that your son is not receiving in-kind income from your boyfriend. If a denial has already been finalized, appeal and submit the same statement together with copies of the rental agreement or lease and the utility bills.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Tori

    My son was recently diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy I work full time but will be cutting back 10 hours a week to get him to physical therapy and occupational therapy appointments. I was told based on his diagnoses he would be approved for SSI but due to the fact they have to include my boyfriends income they would deny it. I was wondering if this was correct? I pay $600 towards rent, buy the groceries, and the household necessities. My son is not my boyfriends child and I take care of him financially.

  • shelby hill

    I recently had a hearing the end of sept. My health is in very bad condition and I can barely walk…I am owed back pay for 2 1/2 years…Me and my husband currently do not live together he lives with his mom….I rent from his mother who charges me 350.00 to be paid back if I get back pay. She helps me with everything…paying in hopes to be payed back. My meds are getting pretty expensive and I cant afford some. Also getting so bad I having trouble driving to Drs out of town.. I do not no my husbands work situation….I am in a very bad way and my mother in law is not gonna continue to pay my bills….do you know how all this works and if they will even aprove me????So very worried

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Shelby,

      If you and your husband are living under the same roof (both with your mother-in-law), it is likely that you will be determined to be living together even though you consider yourselves to be separated and occupy different bedrooms. In that circumstance, your husband’s income and assets will be considered in determining your eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If you are living in a different dwelling from where your husband lives, his income and assets will not be considered.

      If you really have to repay your mother-in-law for the unpaid rent and any food or utilities she paid for you and any cash she has given you, you need to prove that you have received a bona fide (real) loan. Such a loan agreement would state when and how you would repay her and she would need to have kept a list of all the help she has given you each month.

      Sincerely.
      Kay

  • Hi I am a single mom and has a minor child with disability. I’d just like to know if my son’s SSI will automatically be cut off since my source of income is him on IHSS for $2600 gross each month and he started to receive child support from his father for $1300 a month. Right now we are receiving $308 for his monthly SSI benefits that causes me to work part time and grossing me monthly an extra $900 a month. Will SSI Stopped together with IHSS? we live in Los angeles, California and cost of living is too high including our apartment.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Cheh,

      Two-thirds of the child support, $866, counts as income and makes your child ineligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) even if you did not have the other income.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Hi Kay, my sister lives with me and my husband and 3 children and she receives $72 dollars in ssi and also receives $681 in social security. And my husband receives $2800 a month and a month my rent is $925 and my utilities are $400 also food is $750 and she pays me for rent and food also for utilities would that affect her ssi.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Mickey,

      As long as your sister pays at least her share of rent, shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and food, her Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will not be adversely affected by living with you. Her share is one sixth of those expenses. If the $400 utilities does not include phone or cable, her share is $346.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Andrea

    Hi, Im a single mother of a 9 year old daughter, who was recently diagnosed with ADHD-Combine type. since I work full-tome. there is no since of applying for help with coverage for my disabled daughter, my work paychecks are being stretched out then, due to all her medical expenses, that doesn’t give me good coverage through my employer, so her bills are tripling!

    can someone please help me, is it worth me applying and asking for help? if my income will be considered all my daughters income, even though I pay for our rent, and car payments to get back and fourth to work? do they considered my actual income it takes to provide a meal and roof for us?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Andrea,

      Part of your work earnings are excluded as a work incentive and $733 is allowed for your own support. If you want to give me your gross wages per pay period and how often you are paid, I’ll estimate whether or not your daughter might be financially eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • ManI Karr

    Hello,
    I applied for SSI and told them that my son has a life insurance policy in my name but he is the owner of that policy. SSI says my resources are over the limit because the cash value is around $5000.

    Can I appeal this decision based on fact that the policy owner is my son?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Manl,

      If your son owns the policy on your life and you cannot cash it in, it should not count toward your resource limit. Accordingly, an appeal seems to be in order.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Judy

    My mother in law just moved in with us and she receives disability and full medical for COPD. We are not charging her rent but she pays for her own cell phone. If I claim her as a dependent on our taxes will her disability benefits be affected?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Judy,

      If your mother-in-law is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), her free housing will cause her SSI benefits to be reduced whether or not you claim her on your taxes. If she receives Social Security Disability (SSDI), her living free in your home or claiming her on your taxes will not affect her SSDI benefits. I do suggest that you confer with a tax accountant to see whether your mother-in-law qualifies for you to claim her.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jose Ruiz

    My father receives SSI. If his daughters moves in with and she works, will his they reduced his SSI? He wants to put her on the lease which means her income from work is included when they figure out the new rents he has to pay.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jose,

      As long as your father’s daughter does not pay for more than half of the shelter costs and half of the food costs if they share food, her living with your father will not affect his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. He does, however, need to report to SSA that she has moved in. When he does, he needs to submit a statement from her as to her paying only half.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Kelly

    My single mother was just awarded her SSI. I go to college full time and I am about to start working. Will my income from work affect the amount of disability that she gets?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kelly,

      Your income will not affect your mother’s benefits. If you contribute to shelter and food costs, your contribution will not affect her benefits as long as you do not pay more than your share.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Diana

    Hi I’m a single mother of 2 one of my daughter’s was approved for ssi and was told she will be recieving $422 a month what I don’t understand is why she is not going to receive her full beniefts if I have no income I don’t work,because I take care of her yes her non custodial parent is court ordered to pay child support of $300 for both my daughter’s but he has not paid anything for a year now please some advise??

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Diana,

      This is in response to both your posts. The maximum Supplemental Security Income (SSI) of $733 is paid to individuals with income of $20 or less. Income may be cash payments such as child support or in-kind (non-cash) income in the form of free or subsidized shelter or food, which is called “support and maintenance.” (SNAP benefits and government housing subsidies are not counted as income). If you and your children are not paying fair market value for your rental or you live with other people and do not pay your share, that may be causing a reduction up to up to a $244.34.

      I suggest that you make an appointment for a review of the calculation of your child’s payment. If you have or can get any proof that you are not getting child support for the children, take that with you. Once you know how the benefit is being calculated, you can provide whatever documentation is needed to get the benefits corrected if an error is being made.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Diana

    Hi I’m a single mother of 2 one of my daughter’s was approved for ssi and was told she will be recieving $422 a month what I don’t understand is why she is not going to receive her full beniefts if I have no income I don’t work,because I take care of her please some advise??

  • carol

    hi, I have received favorable decision on ssi/disabled widow. I live with my boyfriend who makes good money but I am independent and have always paid my share of household when I worked and he has let my live with him while my claim has gone from beginning to end. we have kept records of all expenses he has paid and expects to be repaid. I had my financial interview at the local office two days ago. I was treated rudely. we live in Oklahoma which still has common law but we have or never have planned on marriage and do not represent ourselves to others as married. we are only boyfriend and girlfriend. he has substantial personal items (cars, motorcycles, buying home). we are in the process of showing I am not on the title of any of his belongings or bank accounts. he has a life insurance policy through work that he has named his 2 sons and myself as beneficiaries on. I stated to the ssa that his things are his and mine are mine but she treated me as a thief. I need insurance desperately to repair my neck and back so needless to say, ssi and Medicaid are detrimental to my health. will the life insurance I am named on disqualify me? thank you and hope you understand what i’m trying to find out.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Carol,

      The life insurance will not count as your asset because you do not own the policy. If on the life insurance beneficiary designation yuou are shown as friend or girlfriend and not wife, the policy would serve as additional proof that you are not presenting yourself to the public as married.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Joe L Gonzalez

    I receive $117 a month SSI not diability and have a pension which why they reduced my benefit from$380. My wife will receive approx $900 in three years since she is only 59. We thought of selling our home and banking appox $150,000 and then renting. Will this lum some effect hers or mine. If so I will not sell the home.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Joe,

      Sale of your home and keeping $150,000 cash will cause your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to stop and probably your Medicaid if you have Medicaid. If you also have Medicare and Medicaid is paying your premium, you will have to pay your Medicare premium. Note that when your wife’s $900 retirement benefit starts, you may be ineligible for SSI based on it and your pension, whether or not you sell the house. Sale of the house will not affect your or your wife’s Social Security benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Wayne

    My Wife is on SSI, I found out last month I have a pension plan I can start drawing from or take a 1 time lump sum, how would this affect my wife if I chose 1 lump sum non-recurring payment roughly 20k? And does she need to notify Social security right away of our plans? I realize she may lose her SSI benefits.

    Sincerely,
    Wayne

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Wayne,

      Your pension plan became or will become a countable resource in the month that the funds become available to you. The full amount will count as a resource wither or not you decide to take it out as a lump sum withdrawal because you have the option to do so. You are right that your wife’s SSI eligibility will end–at least temporarily.

      As a couple, your resource limit is $3,000. You can use the 401k money to cover what your wife’s SSI was paying for. You can also use it for other things you need–new tires, deferred dental work, household repairs, etc. If the money is released mid-month, there could be a one-month overpayment to repay. Keep receipts so you can show where the money goes. When you are down to $3,000, you can report the change and her SSI will start again without application as long as she is not ineligible for twelve months.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Wayne

        Since I’ll be turning 57 this July, does that mean my Wife will be penalized since the funds were available to me when I was 55? In other words she will owe 2 yrs of over payment even though I just found out I had a pension.

        Thank You,

        Wayne

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Wayne,

          If the fund is counted retroactively, your wife will be overpaid as far back as it is counted. You can try to make the case that the money was not a resource before you knew of its existence. If you recently got a letter notifying you about your options, you can submit it. You might also try to get a letter from the pension administrator that you were not previously notified of the pension when you turned fifty-five. This might be easier to establish if it is from an employer you worked for a long time ago. If it is counted all the way back, your wife can try appealing the decision.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • My daughter has been receiving Social Security benefits since birth, (she was a premie who was later diagnosed with autism.) She just had her 18th birthday, and now we have a review of her case. Is my income still use to determine her eligibility for SSI?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Sharon,

      Your child is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) due to her disability, not Social Security. Now that she is age eighteen, your income and assets do not affect her SSI eligibility.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Janie House

        My son has Down’s syndrome. He just turned 18 and is receiving SSI for the first time. He gets $488. SS told me he did not receive the full benefit because we make enough money to subsidize his living. This seems wrong. Also, what happens when I retire at age 64 which will be two years!

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Janie,

          The amount of money you make is not affecting your son’s benefits. His receiving free housing and perhaps free food is the reason for his receiving less than the maximum Supplemental Security Income (SSI). His benefit will be increased two months after he starts paying his share of shelter and food expenses or his share of shelter and purchases and has his food prepared separately from yours. His share is the total expenses divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

          When you apply for retirement benefits for yourself, you can apply for Childhood Disability Benefits (CDB)for him on your earnings records. At that time his SSI will be reduced or stopped depending on the amount of his CDB.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Anita

    Me and my husband receive ssi and my husband also receives ssdi. My question is if my nineteen year old goes to work will her income effect our benefits.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Anita,

      Your daughter’s income does not affect your or your husband’s benefits. You daughter can contribute to shelter and/or food expenses if she is living with you and not affect your SSI benefits as long as she doesn’t contribute more than her share, which is one-third, assuming there are three in your household.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Kayla

    My two year old receives SSI, and they are going based by my boyfriends income since I am not working . We are now separating and I was curious if I rented a room with my two children with my mom ( who doesn’t receive SSI ) would this affect his payments? I’m just trying to figure out my living situation to where it won’t mess with his SSI or insurance .
    I will be paying rent and for our own food and a half of the water and light bill with
    child support.and my SSI.
    Any information will be helpful!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kayla,

      In order not to cause a reduction in your child’s SSI, you either have to live in your mother’s home as a renter and pay fair market value (FMV) for the rooms you and your children occupy including utilities or pay enough that your disabled son is paying his share of shelter expenses. His share is one quarter of the shelter utilities (power, water/sewer and garbage), rent or mortgage, property taxes and, if required by the lender the property insurance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Valerie

    I was hoping for some advice. I live in my own home and I receive SSI. My 22 year old daughter still lives at home and just received a significant pay raise at her job. Will this affect the amount of my SSI payment?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Valerie,

      Your daughter’s income does not affect your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. If she starts to pay more of the shelter and food costs and pays more than half, it will affect your benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Veronica

    Hey, My daughter got approved for ssi for $350.00 a month her I live with my mom an don’t pay any rent I think this is why her benefits are so low. I don’t work as well I’m going to be moving this weekend with my cousin an her husband and three children. The rent is 979 we going to split three ways an electric is aroend $250 which will be split me an my daughter will eat spreatly and Im going to pick up a baby sitting job for $65.00 a week will my daughter benefits go up or down. Thanks an advaned

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Veronica,

      Your work earnings will be low enough that they will not affect your daughter’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Your daughter’s share of rent and shelter utilities is one-seventh of the total cost. Based on your estimate of expenses, her share would be $175.57 ($979 + $250 / 7). When she starts paying her share, her benefits will increase beginning two months later. When you report the move, take proof of the expenses and a statement from the person whose name is on the rental agreement to confirm how much your daughter will contribute. Also report your work when you start.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Mara

    My in-laws live in a rental property with monthly rental $1200. They get help via food-stamps, as well as pension in a value of $310 monthly. They are getting monthly SSI $430 as a couple. The reason they were only given $400 is because they included in-kind help ($366) since they assumed they have to have gotten some help from someone to be able to pay the rent of $1200.

    Their niece is going to move with them, so their share of rent will be only $800 (instead of 1200) so the in-kind help should not be included anymore..correct? Will the fact that she is the niece not qualify her as a roommate? What document will we need to provide to SSI office to prove that someone else lives with them?
    Thank YOU!!!!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Mara,

      Relatives can share housing. If your in-laws start paying their two-thirds share of rent and shelter utilities (not phone and cable) and they and their niece purchase food separately, their Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit will go up to $810 (the maximum reduced by $290 of the pension) two months after they start paying their share. The problem with this is that their income is less than their share. If they have some savings, they could use their savings to pay their share until the increase. (If their niece pays for phone or cable directly to those companies, it will not affect your in-laws’ benefits.)

      If they cannot pay their share, but can pay for example $600, they could get a smaller increase (two months later) to $610. Once they received the increase, they could then pay their share for two months and get the increase to $810.

      As far as documentation goes, they need a copy of their rental agreement and shelter utility bills and a statement from their niece confirming the date she moved in and the month she started to pay part of the shelter expenses and the amount she is paying.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Cydney Warren

    Ms. Derochie, I am scheduled for my Disability Hearing, before a judge, in a couple of weeks. I have been out of work since March, 2013. My initial application as well as my appeal were both denied. So, the hearing is next step. My husband is the sole source of income in our home at the time. We have 5 daughters. 2 , wh are independent and living their lives in other cities. I have one child who is a Sophomore in College, and two minor children still living with us who are still completely dependant on us, financially. Their ages are 12 and 6. I assumed my disability benefits would be based on the amount indicated on the last Social Security statement I received, which was coincidentally sent right around the time I found it necessary to quit my career. So the amount indicated under the statement: “the amount you would receive should you become disabled at this time” is not necessarily the monthly amount I would receive, should I awarded the benefit. Will my husband’s income decrease my monthly benefit? Finally, retroactive benefits. How far back should I expect them? If awarded benefits, how soon after the hearing will I receive the retro pay as well as my monthly benefit? I’m sorry for bombarding you with questions. This whole process is Greek to me.
    Respectfully,
    C. Warren

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Cydney,

      If your claim is approved with a March disability date, your Social Security Disability benefits will begin the later of September 2013 or twelve months before the month you filed your application. If your earnings history is high enough, your two minor children will be eligible for benefits in the same months that you are. (Your earnings statement should have a family maximum benefit listed; if it is higher than your estimated benefits, the difference will be paid to your children. The estimate on the earnings statement is, as it says, an estimate and may vary a couple hundred dollars or more from the estimate.

      Your husband’s income does not affect your benefit amount. If you are approved, it will likely be two months from the date of the approval letter or more before your benefits are processed and paid and longer for the children.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Erendira

    My mother in law is 59 and disabled. She was deemed disabled by the SSO but was told that she did not qualify for benefits because of my father-in-laws income. They have a 16 year old son living in the home. Can my mother-in-law file for early retirement, without being penalized since the reason she isn’t working is her disability?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Erendira,

      Your mother-in-law must be at least sixty-two years old to apply for Social Security Retirement benefits and she must have enough forty quarters of coverage (work credits) earned throughout her lifetime. When your father-in-law retires and receives Social Security, if she is sixty-two, she may be eligible for dependent benefits on his record.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Elizabeth Vinas

    and now ssi is only giving me 429,00 monthly

  • my childrens father receives ssi they use my income to determine his monthly amount. My 20 year old son lives with us and just got a job. Do we need to report his income?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Colleen,

      You do not need to report your son’s income. If he starts contributing to household expenses and pays more than his share, you do need to report that. His share is the total of the rent or mortgage, shelter utilities (not cable or phone) and food (if you share food) divided by the number of people in the household.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • sue

      my son gets an ssi his 21 year sister has a job do i need to count her income with my sons father income

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Sue,

        Because your daughter is an adult and not a dependent child, her income is not considered in determining your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment amount. The reason is that none of her father’s income is allocated (excluded) for her support.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  • Chrissy

    Hi. My friends husband receives ssdi for himself and two children. They have been separated for two mos. She can support the children on her own, but she is worried she could get into trouble if she doesn’t report that he is receiving ssdi for the kids who are not living with him. I told her that should be his responsibility. Now I’m wondering if I gave her the correct advice. Will social security even talk to her about her husband being fraudulent? Additionally, she believes he is able to work, but he just doesn’t want to.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Chrissy,

      Your friend should go to Social Security and file to be payee for the children who are with her and request that Social Security get the children’s money for the past two months refunded so it can be reissued to her for the children.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Becky Sonstegard

    Our daughter gets SSI, my husband works and we just had our review. We have 3 other children at home–19,17 and 9. The 19 year old just started working, the person doing the review said that her income is counted to determine our 14 year old daughter’s payment. Is that true?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Becky,

      I believe that the information you got is incorrect because the income of a non-disabled child is included in calculations only if the child is under age eighteen. At this point, the calculation of your disabled child’s SSI payment should consider two minor non-disabled children in the household. If they had income, it would reduce the portion of your income that could be allotted for their support. You may have been talking to a service representative and not a claim representative. Service representatives have less detailed knowledge and do not calculate claims.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Hannah

    I was approved for SSI in April 2015. I live with my husband and 3 children, my husband was laid off in 2013, I have not worked in years. I became disabled in 2012. The only income right now is that if my three children, one of whom is disabled. Two are adults (incl the disabled one), one is a minor. All three work minimum wage jobs, one fulltime, two parttime.

    Our kids have been paying the utility bills for the most part, and we had used savings to pay the mortgage, which my SSI check now covers.

    Does the income of our children count against me? SSA recently asked me for an interview and they want to see all bank stubs and pay stubs. Do I include the pay stubsfor my children and their bank accounts too?

    My husband has a 401k from the job he was laid off from. He cannot withdraw from it yet. We told SSA about it as well as an inherited IRA I got from my late mother in 2008. They approved my SSI so I assume you are allowed to have an inherited IRA and 401K if you cannot access them. Is this true or did they make a mistake?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Hannah,

      You do not have to report your adult children’s income or assets; they are not considered in determining your payment amount. You do need to provide proof of mortgage, utilities, and if your children share food with you your household’s food costs and the portion that you and your husband pay from your savings and the amount the children pay. If you are paying your share, your children’s contribution to household expenses will not affect your SSI payment.

      I believe that the 401k accounts are not countable resources if they cannot be accessed without a tax penalty; however, you should still report them to the Social Security Administration to be sure. (Note that your inherited account may be accessible to you because you are disabled.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Patricia Mattox

        My mother in law drew SSI her now deceased husband drew SSDI So she now draws off him.My husband draws SSDI .I work ,if we move in with her will it affect her check

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Patricia,

          Your and your husband’s income has no impact on your mother-in-law Social Security widow’s benefits. If she also receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and you move in with her and she does not pay her share (one-third) of shelter costs (and one-third of food costs if you share food), her SSI payment could be affected by her not paying her share, but not by your income.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Ardan Altenhof

    My 14 year old son was recently diagnosed with leukemia. How do I determine the formula that could help indicate what he would be eligible to receive? Thanknyou

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ardan,

      You can use the formula in the sample calculation in the article “What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect an SSI Application for Children?” under the “SSI” tab on the navigation bar of this website.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • rosalie filozof

    My son gets ssi my other son just been approved my income is 1500 month will they count my other sons ssi as my income I have no child support or anything else ad far as income

    • rosalie filozof

      Also I have 1 more child does recieve anything

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Rosalie,

      Your son’s SSI will not count as income in determining the amount of your second child’s SSI. If part of your income is deemable to your children, that amount will be split evenly with half counting to reduce each child’s SSI payment. In other words, if neither child has income (besides SSI), their SSI payment amounts will be the same.

      Sincerely,
      Kay
      S

  • Michelle Chapman

    Hi, My son gets SSI at the reduced rate of $488.67 because he lives with us. I was wondering how to get to full amount? We have been charging him rent but didn’t know I needed to tell them that. Will paying rent affect his payments or possibly increase them?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Michelle,

      The fact that your son is now paying rent could increase his Supplemental Security Income (SSI)benefit.You and he should make a statement to Social Security regarding the amount of rent his is paying and the month he started to pay the for his room (or room and board if you are providing food.) If he is paying a flat rate for rent and not sharing expenses, you will not have to provide information about your household expenses. The increase, if any, will occur two months after the month he started to pay rent. If you have not done so in the past, have your son pay you with a check or money order so there is proof of the transaction.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Cynthia S

    My son receives SSI and has for the last 4 years. I recently was found disable and was wondering if his payments would affect mine?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Cynthia,

      Your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will not affect your disability benefits. If your son is a minor and lives with you and you receive Social Security Disability (SSDI), your benefits might affect his SSI. If he is a minor or unmarried and became disabled before age twenty-two, he might be eligible for dependent benefits on your earnings record.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Bruce solomon

    Hey how you doing I wanted to no if I got approved for disability which I have but I was working the two years before I got approve I had to hire a lawyer and we went to court and the judge say i wasn’t going get anything for 2014 but the judge knew i was working part time because she ask question about what all i do at my job and im limited to the thing i can do at my job but finally after explaining that the judge made a favorable decision my question the is I was working part time three years is a long time to go with out working but I got a part time job till then

    • Bruce solomon

      Then the case worker called and told me that I was approved but the judge made the call to give me a fully favorable I’m nerves because I’m steal working my part time job advice please

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Bruce,

      If you met the disability requirements for at least twelve months, you will be paid benefits. Part of the requirements are that you be unable to perform substantial gainful activity, which often means not having gross earnings over a certain limit ($1,070 in 2014; $1,040 in 2013, $1,010 in 2012, and $1,000 in 2012). If you earned under that amount, you could be eligible throughout. If after being disabled for twelve months, you earned over that amount, you could have worked long enough that you already exhausted your Trial Work Period and Extended Period of Eligibility (EPE), which are return-to-work incentives. If that is the case, you could be approved for a closed period of disability (no ongoing benefits). If you are in the middle of the EPE, you will not be paid for any past months you were over the limit, but if you stop work or drop your earnings to below SGA, benefits could start again.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • anastasia m nunez

        Hi Kay , I have a question .. My 3 yr old son was just diagnosed with ASD. .I applied for SSI for him because I dont get any child support for him. The DR told me to apply so I did in May. . Im a single mother with a household of 4 . …my gross income is $3380 a month. . .is he even gonna qualify for anything or are they gonna base it on my income. . which after rent and car and bills and food we hve no extra savings .. Thank you, Stacy

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Anastasia,

          I calculate that if your non-disabled children have no income that your child would be eligible for about $178 a month and in most states Medicaid insurance.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

    • Bruce solomon

      I was approved and I sent him my check Stubbs he said once he finish he going to call and let me no how much i was going to be get my back pay and when the check began but the judge has told me that one year she was not going to give me anything for I no that like I said before I’m just scared that all……….

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Bruce,

        Well since you have been approved by the judge and the local office’s representative said you would get back pay and didn’t tell you anything about not getting ongoing benefits, there doesn’t appear to be much to worry about.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

        • Bruce solomon

          Thanks

          • Kay Derochie

            You are welcome, Bruce.

  • ALICIA

    I HAVE A CHILD WITH AUTISM AND HE RECIEVES SSI, MY OTHER SON JUST GOT DIAGNOSED WITH AUTISM AS WELL AND I APPLIED FOR SSI FOR HIM. I AM NOT WORKING SO I CAN CARE FOR THEM, WILL THE AMOUNT MY FIRST SON GETS AFFECT WHAT MY SECOND SON GETS? WE HAVE NO OTHER SOURCES OF INCOM.
    TANK YOU

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Alicia,

      Your first son’s SSI will not be affected if your second child is approved for SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

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