Income Excluded from Deeming When Qualifying for SSI Benefits

By / March 3, 2016 / SSI Benefits / 67 Comments

Learn which kinds of income are excluded from deeming when qualifying for SSI disability as a citizen adult, a citizen child or a sponsored alien.

Legally Mandated Exclusions That Apply to All Deeming
As discussed in our article, Why Do I Have to Give Information about My Family’s Income and Assets When I Apply for SSI Benefits? deemed income is the portion of an ineligible person’s income that is considered available to an SSI recipient. Some types of income are excluded when adding up the deemor’s income and the income of ineligible children living in the household. When you apply for SSI benefits, the Social Security Administration will tell you whether or not a specific kind of income affects your SSI application.

Excluded income falls into two categories: income excluded by Social Security law and income excluded other federal laws. This first list itemizes various types of income that federal law other than the Social Security Act excludes from deeming to a potentially eligible SSI applicant. These types of income are excluded from the deemed income calculation for any SSI applicant except as noted related to sponsor-to-alien deeming.

  • Compensation provided to volunteers in the foster grandparents programs and other similar programs, unless determined by the Director of the Action Agency to constitute the minimum wage.
  • Food stamps and Department of Agriculture donated foods.
  • Disaster assistance may be excluded.
  • The value of any assistance paid with respect to a dwelling unit under The United States Housing Act of 1937; the National Housing Act, Section 101 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1965, or Title V of the Housing Act of 1949. This exclusion applies to the income of sponsors of aliens only if the alien is living in the housing unit for which the sponsor receives the housing assistance.
  • Per capita payments under section 6 of Public Law 94-540 made to, or held in trust for, members of the Grand River Band of Ottawa Indians in Indian Claims Commission docket number 40-K. This applies to the income of sponsors of aliens only if the alien lives in the sponsor’s household.
  • Per capita judgment funds to tribes or groups under section 7 of Public Law 93-134, as amended. This applies to the income of sponsors of aliens only if the alien lives in the sponsor’s household.
  • Revenues from the Maine Indians Claims Settlement Fund and Land Acquisition Fund paid under section 5 of Public Law 96-420. This applies to the income of sponsors of aliens only if the alien lives in the sponsor’s household.

The following is a partial list of exclusions from deeming that are provided for by Social Security law. They apply only to spouse-to-spouse deeming and parent-to-child deeming, unless otherwise noted.

  • All of the federally mandated exclusions just listed above.
  • Any public income maintenance payments and any income which was counted or excluded in figuring the amount of that payment.
  • Any of the income of an ineligible spouse, parent, or ineligible child that is used by a public income-maintenance program to determine the amount of that program’s benefit to someone else.
  • Any portion of a grant, scholarship, or fellowship used to pay tuition or other educational expenses.
  • Money received for providing foster care to an ineligible child.
  • The value of food stamps and the value of Department of Agriculture donated foods. These are also excluded from the income of an essential person or the sponsor of an alien by other federal statute.
  • Home produce grown for personal consumption.
  • Tax refunds on real property or food purchased by the family.
  • Income used to fulfill an approved Plan to Achieve self-support.
  • Any income that is used to comply with the terms of court-ordered support or support payments enforced under Title IV-D of the Social Security Act.
  • The value of in-kind support and maintenance. In-kind home energy assistance, housing, utilities, and food are excluded from an ineligible spouse’s or parent’s income and from the income of an ineligible child or of an eligible alien who is sponsored by an ineligible spouse or parent. However, in-kind income from work or other sources that is not support and maintenance, that is not compensation in the form of shelter or food, is countable at its current market value.
  • Periodic payments made by a state under a program established before July 1, 1973 and based solely on duration of residence and attainment of age sixty-five.
  • Disaster assistance. Some types of disaster assistance may also be excluded from the income of an essential person or the sponsor of an alien.
  • Infrequent or irregular income to certain limits.
  • Work expenses of the blind.
  • Income paid under a Federal, State, or local government program to provide chore, attendant, or homemaker services to the eligible individual.
  • Certain home energy assistance and support and maintenance assistance. Such assistance is also excluded from the income of an essential person or the sponsor of an alien;
  • An ineligible child’s or sponsored alien child’s earned income up to the monthly and yearly maximums for the Student Earned Income Exclusion, provided that the child is a student as defined by Social Security. The exclusion applies in sponsor-to-alien deeming as well.
  • Exclusion of revenues from the Alaska Native Fund paid under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, Public Law 92-203, as amended.

Income Excluded from Deeming When Qualifying for SSI Benefits
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  • Dear Alisha,

    If there is one parent in the household and the children do not have income and your mean the $2,720 is gross wages, I estimate that your child will be eligible for about $357 a month federal SSI. Your local office can tell you whether the state of Maryland also pays an SSI state supplement for children.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Pam,

    The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) general income exclusion is $20. Irregular and infrequent income up to $60 in one calendar quarter can also be excluded. Your mother’s pension and Social Security exceed the allowable income to receive even a one-dollar federal SSI payment. Government subsidized housing and SNAP are excluded income for SSI.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • You are welcome, Blanca.

  • Dear Blanca,

    If you do not have other children in the household, your son will be eligible for about $322 a month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • You are welcome, AJ.

  • Dear AJ,

    I am not sure that the information you received is correct with regard to the 401k not counting because it is not yours. It is more likely that it has not been counted because your husband is not yet 50 1/2.It may count now in its entirety.

    In any event, the attorney is correct. Only one month’s SSI will be affected if the house is paid off in the same month as the withdrawal. (Your husband could withdraw an additional amount to repay the SSI overpayment for that month.) Before doing the withdrawal, he may want to consult a tax accountant because the withdrawal will be subject to taxation and he will need to gross up the withdrawal to include the taxes that will be sent to the IRS and to the state revenue department if your state has an income tax.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • april buckley

    My daughter is disabled and receives benefits.

    My employer pays for my health insurance and other benefits. They add it to my pay and then deduct it before taxes are added. Can this be deemed as part of my income or should it be excluded?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear April,

      I do not know the answer to your question for sure. If the employer did not show the benefit cost on your paycheck, the purchase of benefits for you definitely would not be income for SSI purposes. I think that you can argue that the addition and subtraction of the benefits net out to zero so zero should be counted for them.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Hi Kay,

    My husband is permanently disabled and his case in considered non reviewable due to the classification and such. We also have a disabled son that I have been receiving pay from Fed, State, Local system for providing IHSS protective services. I also work full time outside the home and our new case worker has sent us an email stating that my husband needs to be the paid provider of our sons IHSS protective services. Does the statement from above and with the asterisk below allow my husband to do what the social worker suggest and not have it affect his social security disability ?

    *Income paid under a Federal, State, or local government program to provide chore, attendant, or homemaker services to the eligible individual.

    Sincerely,
    Julie Wolfe

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Julie,

      Please tell what kind of disability benefits your husband receives–Social Security (SSD) or Supplemental Security (SSI) so that I can reply.

      Thanks,
      Kay

  • Michelle Bernat

    Hello, I have been approved for SSI….I have a husb. whose gross earnings are $2,000 per month, and a 10 year old who has $83 per month in child support. Our total monthly bills are about $1,068, incl. food which we eat together. I earn about $40 per month working as a school lunchroom worker. Can you help me figure out my SSI payment? Thanks so much…

    • Michelle Bernat

      Kay…also, my child is on Medicaid…does this mean we can’t have the allotment from her step-dad’s income considered (support allotment)? Minus the $83 child support?

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Michelle,

        Medicaid eligibility does not affect the SSI payment computation. The allotment for the child’s support is $284 (the maximum allotment of $367 reduced by $83 child support).

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Michelle,

      I estimate that you will be eligible for the $125 a month in Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Michelle Bernat

        Hello…do you have a formula to figure the estimate out? I had thought it would be a little more…thanks.

        • Michelle Bernat

          Also…I make $40 a month, not week…as a cafeteria worker.

          • Kay Derochie

            Dear Michelle,

            Yes, I used $40 a month in the formula.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Michelle,

          You can view the formula in the sample calculation in the article “What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect Payment Amounts and Qualifying for SSI Disability?” under the SSI tab at the top of this webpage.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Michelle Bernat

            Does it make a difference if the step dad is in home vs. bio dad? I came up with $265 per month SSI using the formula on here….thanks.

            • Kay Derochie

              Dear Michelle,

              Parent and stepparent income and assets are treated the same.

              Sincerely,
              Kay

  • Tonia

    My husband and I recently got married. I am receiving the max amount of SSI 733.00 he makes 250 a week after taxes 300 before how does that effect me even if we don’t live together

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tonia,

      If you don’t live together, your husband’s income does not affect you unless he gives you some of it or pays for your rent or shelter. If you live together, in months that he has four weekly paychecks, your SSI would go down by about $178 if you have no children. In months that he gets five paychecks the reduction would be about $348.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • jason

    I receive SSI and my husband is going to get a raise at his work.I relieve about $500 in child support a month and my husband will gross about $2100 a month.I was wondering how much SSI money I will get each month? any help would be great.thanks

    • jason

      Sorry I forgot to mention, I live in Maine.

      • jason

        Also if rent counts I pay $600 a month in rent.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Jason,

          How much you pay for housing only matters if you have people other than your spouse and your and your spouse’s minor children in the household.

          Sincerely,
          Ka

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jason,

      The child support should not be counted as your income; instead, it should be considered your child’s income. This means that none of your husband’s income will be excluded as an allotment for the child’s support.Assuming your husband doesn’t pay child support and that you have no other children in the household, your SSI will be about $249.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • wendy

        I was just wondering how you figured out that number? is there a chart?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Wendy,

          There is no chart. You can review the formula in the sample calculation in the article under which you posted this question.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Christina

    Dear Kay

    I am a mother of 6 children, my son was just diagnose with autism.
    My husband gross income is 1702.00 from his retirement pay and 1136.13 from veterans disability pay. Dose my son qualify for SSI.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Christina,

      Given the number of children under age eighteen that your husband’s income is supporting, you autistic child qualifies for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) in terms of family income. The family’s assets also have to be below the limits and, of course, he has to qualify medically.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Tricia

    Hi I am as stay at home mother of two Autistic boys. My husband works and before taxes he makes to much money and my boys were not approved for ssi…is their some kinda “deeming” we can do?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tricia,

      Deeming was applied when determining that your boys are not financially eligible for Supplemental Security Income. Deeming means that the law deems (presumes) that a certain amount of parents’ income is available for support the the disabled child or children. Allowances for support of the parents and any non-disabled minor children and work-incentive exclusions are applied in a set formula used to decide how much of the income is deemed available for the children’s support. You can see a sample calculation in the article “What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect an SSI Application for Children?” under the SSI tab on the navigation bar at the top of this web page.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Luz Jaramillo

    I’m currently diagnosed with ALS and was approved for SSDI. I also have Employer’s long term disability benefits which now provide assisted living benefits.
    I received back paid assisted living benefits for $5500.00 and the insurance company will be sending me about $550.oo monthly up to 34.6 month. Will this increase of money affect my regular $1400.00 SSDI benefit? Please help me to understand and thank you so much for your great advise.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Luz,

      Benefits paid on your long-term disability (LTD) policy will not affect your Social Security Disability (SSDI). On the other hand, SSDI benefits usually reduce LTD benefits, so if you have not already reported your Social Security to your LTD insurance company, you should do so.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Gerald Parkin

    Hi, I am currently on SSDI, receiving $263 a month. I have just received letters telling me I’m losing my health insurance and am being put on Medicare. The amount I will have to pay may well come to more than the $263 I receive. I’m thinking of applying for SSI. I receive a disability pension from the country of my birth, is this income I must declare.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Gerald,

      Yes, you must declare all income you receive and all assets that you own. You might investigate some of the programs that help people with lower income pay their Medicare premiums. You can get more information at http://www.medicare.gov.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • mIchele robertson

    Hi. Does Aetna ltd usually communicate to ssd how much they pay me for ltd or am I suppose to tell ssd? iF ssd did not know how much I was
    Receiving from Aetna will this change the amount of benefits I was determined to receive?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Michele,

      Aetna cannot release information about your benefits without your written permission. Social Security will not be reduced by your long-term disability (LTD), but your LTD will probably be reduced by your Social Security benefits. If you receive Social Security back pay, it would be good to hold onto itin case you have to use it to repay an LTD overpayment for the months you were eligible for both Social Security and LTD.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Linda Robinson

    My husband has been approved for his ssdi 1253 a month. I have been receiving ssi for the last 5 yrs of 733 a month. We have no assets. Will I lose all of my ssi or will I just receive a smaller amount? Also I’m worried about losing my Medicaid. Thank you for your time.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Linda,

      You will no longer be eligible for SSI once your husband’s Social Security starts because your combined income is above $1,119. You will lose your Medicaid based on SSI eligibility, but your family income may be low enough that you will qualify based on different criteria. If not, try applying for government-subsidized health insurance under the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). The annual open enrollment under the Affordable Care Act is in progress now through January 31. You can get more information at http://www.healthcare.gov.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • cheri

    My disabled daughter suffered a head injury when she was 3 years old. She is now 22 years old. She obtained a tax exempt annuity to help her cover expenses when she was older, and monthly payments of $390 per month for life. This is tax exempt. She has a seizure disorder and heart arythmia that affects her daily life, and cannot work a job. She cannot stand for more than 20 minutes without affecting her heart. She has a service dog to help her with seizures and alert her when her heart is out of rythym so she can get somewhere safe to prevent it from stopping. She has tried to apply for SSI and SSD, but because of her bank account (she has $20k in there to help her, but it is the tax exempt annnuity that has to last her her entire life), she has been denied. Is this unearned “income” exempt? She has no other way to support herself, and cannot live on $390 per month. Her savings has been dwindling rapidly.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Cheri,

      Your daughter must have both income and resources below the SSI limits. She was denied Supplemental Security Income (SSI) because the $20,000 has been determined to be a countable resource (asset). If she has access the principal (can cash in the annuity or make withdrawals higher than $390), then it is likely correct that the $20,000 has been counted against the $2,000 asset limit. On the other hand, if legally she cannot access the principal, then she should appeal saying that her resources are below $2,000 because she doesn’t have access to the principal of the annuity. She must appeal within sixty days of the denial; if she is outside the appeals period, she’ll have to file a new claim. Note that she will have to present some documentation that shows her access is restricted. If she is approved based on resources within the limit, $370 of the $390 a month will count to reduce her SSI payment amount.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • anthony

    Hello,i just got approved for ssi. I rent my mothers house. Being she is family she gives me a break on the rent. I pay 800 a month with heat and electric included. If she had to rent to a stranger she would probally want 1400 a month. Will the 600 dollar differnce be considered deeming income. I live with 2 of my kids ages 8 and 12 and pay for our own food. My mother does not live with us. Also I am seperated from my wife but last years tax refund we split in half. 4500 each. Is the tax refund considerated as income. I have no income at all and need as much of the 700 and change from SSI I can get…..Do you think I would get the max from SSI and will any thing I typed abrove bring my back pay down? November 11 2015 will be a year since I filled and been waiting for a decision.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Anthony,

      Your mother is subsidizing your family’s housing by $600 a month. With three in the household, your subsidy is $200. Of that $180 will be countable income. You do not say what income you have that allows you to pay $800 a month rent. Unless that income is a welfare payment, it is likely that you will not be eligible for SSI because your income is too high, even before the housing subsidy.

      Tax refunds typically are not countable income; however, I do not know how your refund will be treated if you did not have taxable income and you are not living together. If the $4,500 is countable, it would count as income in the month it was received. If you carried over part of the money to the following month, the amount carried over would count toward your $2,000 resource limit. If you were over the limit in some months, you would not be eligible in those months.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Nichole Noel

    To Kay
    I sent a comment question regarding ssi and wonder why it shoowed up then disappeared? Is that to give time to reply?
    nichole 6.25.2015

    • Nichole Noel

      Thanks, sorry sloppy spelling. This is exausting. After all l have read l am so insecure I think a professional would he invaluable in listing expenses.to turn in on the application.The attorney won the max for his fee but we have no idea how to maximize the benefit amount.for the monthly or backpay. Apologize for being so dense Nichole

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Nichole,

        Social Security back pay will be paid based on your earnings record so there is no strategy to apply. Back pay is based on your actual income, resources, and living arrangements in the months that you were waiting for a decision, so again, there is really no strategy for the past. Ongoing, living arrangements can determine payment amount, which means that if you pay for your own housing and food, you will receive more than if you don’t.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Nichole,

      I just responded to your first posting.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Nichole Noel

        Kay,
        months before we went to the hearing as soon as we hired the atty. I asked did we not need to send a financial statement of expenses for my 29 yr. old son he was representing. His answer was no. Now, my son will be able to live on his own with a caregiver in his own independant place. He has signed upfor section 8 and l am elderly and in poor health and unable to physically or financially support him. He needs to become and me to not co-dependant anymore. It’s not healthy.It’s a question l need a CPA to do this plan now. I was not able to get aNy advise or assistance about this from the atty. He won now regafdless there is 3 years back pay and he will get paid. I was told today that he went to hearing and won June 23rd this month and that social security is assessing his expenses on him living in my rental condo. The waiting for section 8 is another hurdle. Apologies for throwing so much at you in this Q&A. I’ve been left out to dry by attorney that l gave a case to die for and the things l addressed l need to know as it looks like l don’t want to have to appeal the amount of his check.
        Thankful you are on board to answer my questions.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Nichole,

          If your son was approved for Social Security benefits, where he has been living will not affect the amount of his back pay or ongoing benefits. If he was also approved for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), his benefits will be calculated on a monthly basis. If he was living rent free in your condo for some months, he will receive less SSI for those months. Typically, attorneys who help with the medical approval don’t get involved with calculation of the benefit amounts.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Dorothy

    Hi Kay, I have a quick question for you. I applied for SSI in February of 2014. I have since appealed my denial and am awaiting a hearing date. I am financially struggling while I am waiting. I have no legal representation so i am doing this all on my own. So my question for you is if I find a 20 hour a week hob that pays $10.80 an hour will that affect my SSI claim? Will I be denied? Thank you in advance.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Dorothy,

      The amount of earnings that you describe will not automatically make you ineligible for Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits; however, the work activity does have to be reported to the judge. The judge will consider it and your medical evidence to determine whether you could actually be working more than you are, that is, performing substantial gainful activity, which is usually defined as $1,090 gross per month.

      It is a good idea to have legal representation at a hearing. You do not have to pay any legal fees up front and you will pay attorney fees only if you are approved for benefits. Social Security law sets the amount your attorney can charge and the Social Security Administration pays the attorney directly from the retroactive award at the time they send your back pay to you. So, it’s all very easy and risk-free.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Nichole Noel

        Kay,
        what Dorothy said right after my first comment on the 25th or 26th of this month said she was on SSI and could make $1,000.00 and $60.00 did that mean SSDI as l was told only SSDI and onlySSDI cold work and make that income and SSI was for”(poor people)”poor people could only make $20.00 a week.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Nichole,

          Disabled individuals receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI) can work and receive full benefits if they earn less than $1,090 gross per month. Disabled individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are subject to different rules on how their benefits are calculated. The first $65 of gross earnings does not affect benefits ($85 if the person has no other income, but your son will have Social Security so $65 would be applicable for him.) Earnings above $65 will cause a reduction of one dollar for every two dollars over the $65.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Nhung

    I am turning 65 in June. My husband recieves retirement benefit of $1262. He don’t work and I have never work. I been home raising all my children’s and grandkids. How much do you think his income is deem And should I try appky. I know we met the resource limit though.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Nhung,

      There is no resource limit for Social Security retirement or dependent benefits. You can apply for Social Security wife’s benefits now on your husband’s earnings record and receive a slightly reduced benefit or you can wait until you reach age sixty-six (full retirement age) and get slightly more per month. Either way, your benefit is paid in addition to your husband’s. If you decide not to apply for cash benefits until you are sixty-six, you should still apply now for Medicare.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Paul

    Hello,

    I am employed parent of SSI child; live in California. The SSA was not counting $186 from my gross earnings since it was mandatory by employer pre-tax deduction for my Pension plan. The last time I submitted my paystubs and I noticed that they didn’t subtract those $186 from my gross. When I called SSA representative, she couldn’t answer me if they SSA were right before or now, she asked me to contact local SSA office regarding this. Can you please give me a piece of advice about this? Is there any SSA publications about that?
    Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Paul,

      I am not aware of any publication that addresses this specific point, although it is likely addressed somewhere in Social Security’s POMS, which is compilation of Social Security law. In general gross earnings are counted as income. Payroll deductions for savings are part of the gross regardless of where the money is saved. The service representative’s advice to talk to a claims representative in your local office is correct.

      If the full gross earnings should have been counted and your child’s benefits went down when it was counted, your child will be overpaid. You can request waiver of collection of the overpayment, stating that you were not at fault in causing the overpayment because you submitted wage verifications.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Paul

        Thank you Kay.

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Paul

  • sidney

    I have been approved for ssdi and ssi.I got a check for ssi.in the amount of 686.34. And got an award letter stating i would get my ssdi in the amount of 745.00.The ssi backpay amount is 12,758 and the ssdi backpay is 12,404. The lawyer gets 3,101.00. I just got a letter today saying my ssi will be reduced to 8.00 .how can they take my ssi if my ssdi is under the unearned income limit? And i guess now i wont get my backpay for ssi. And i’ll probably have my backpay for ssdi reduced also. This not fair and i cant live on 745 per month and care for 4 children and a wife. Is there anything i can do? HELP?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Sidney,

      Your Social Security (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) back pay will not be affected by the amount of your ongoing SSI benefit. SSI is paid in varying amounts depending on your other income in the month for which SSI is paid. Payment can range from $1 to $733 a month (plus a small state supplement in some states). The first $20 of your Social Security is not counted. Your $8 SSI benefit was calculated by subtracting $725.00 Social Security from the SSI maximum of $733. (The maximum is paid when a person has no other countable income.)

      Once you receive your back payments, your family probably would not be eligible for public assistance from your state. However, you might be eligible while you are waiting for the back pay and again some time in the future after your assets drop below the limits for assistance to families with dependent children. I suggest that you discuss possible assistance with your state’s department of social services to see if help is available.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Lillian

        Hi. I have a question, my mom is receiving $478 from ssi. I wonder if she can apply to increase it. She is the lease holder and her rent is 917. In order to pay she took a roommate and they split the rent and utilities. Will she be able to apply to get the full ssi amount?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Lillian,

          Yes, your mother can ask for a recalculation of her Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment based on now paying her share of the rent and utilities. I assume from your question, that she and her roommate purchase and prepare food separately. If not, she needs to pay half of the food costs also to receive the maximum benefit. Your mother’s payment will increase two months after the month in which she and her roommate started to cover all the costs split equally.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • garland tarver

    Can you work and still apply for ssi. If yes what is the income limits.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Garland,

      For both Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability (SSDI), you must be unable to perform Substantial Gainful Activity, which usually means unable to earn $1,070 gross wages monthly or $1,070 profit from self-employment, although other factors are considered especially when self-employment is involved. Additionally, SSI has total income limits for payment because it is a public assistance program for disabled and aged individuals with low income and assets. If you have no countable income other than your work earnings, the maximum SSI benefit of $721 begins to be reduced after $85 gross earnings. For each $2 above the $85, the SSI benefit goes down by $1.

      Best regards,

      Kay

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