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Do I have to keep going to the doctor after I am approved for disability in order to continue getting Social Security Disability payments?

By   /  March 3, 2016  /  2 Comments

See why you have to keep seeing a doctor after you are approved for Social Security Disability payments, even if you don’t have insurance.

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Watch the Video: “Do I have to keep going to the doctor after I am approved for disability in order to continue getting Social Security Disability payments?”

Appropriate Medical Care for Continuing Disability Reviews

After you have been received Social Security Disability payments for a while, you may be asked to present proof of ongoing disability. The best way to do this is to see your doctor at appropriate intervals. That said, just exactly what “appropriate” means is not simple to define. It depends on the nature of your disabling condition and the treatment plan your doctor has laid out for you. It is important to return to the doctor at the time he or she recommends and to refill prescribed medications on time. If your condition has reached maximum improvement and is permanent, and your doctor has left your care open-ended, saying “Come see me if you have problems,” then it is probably sufficient to have a once-a-year check-up. At the annual check-up ask your doctor to be sure that an update on your disabling condition is noted in your chart, even if it just says that nothing has changed.

Getting Medical Care Without Insurance

Lack of health insurance or cash to cover the cost of care is one of the most frequent reasons that disabled people don’t see a doctor often enough to establish proof of continuing disability. If you are having trouble paying for recommended care, you might try to negotiate lower fees or look for alternatives such as free or low-cost clinics or public medical insurance. If you can’t return for recommended treatment due to lack of funds, try to get your doctor to write in your chart the financial reason why you are not following his recommendations.

For more information on proving continuing disability to keep your Social Security payments, please see our article “Will My Social Security Disability Claim Be Reviewed Again after I Am Approved for Benefits?” and “How Can I Prepare for a Continuing Disability Review of My Social Security Disability Claim?”

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  1. Paige says:

    So I have been approved, for onset of August 2015 and began receiving payments in February 2016, and am in the boat in Texas where now I make too much money with my SSDI which is barely over 1000 a month.
    They took my Medicaid away even though I have dependents still in school. I was being seen on a waiver at my Psych and Therapist offices (bipolar and PTSD), but, was told last week this will stop now if I cannot pay over a 100 per visit. I can not pay that, at all. I have already had to be paying my medication refills from when I last got refills from my doctors; cardiologist, pulmonologist, primary care, neurologist. Those medications add up tremendously. I have actually had to forego a few of them unfortunately. I fear that when I go for a review, them seeing me not going to my specialists will cause my benefits to come into question. I was even seeing a pain management doctor and in middle of spinal injections as well as a speech therapist in the middle of that therapy, when my Medicaid suddenly stopped when my disability was approved.
    I was in shock. I have had additional problems that I am unable to get help with at clinics because it is considered too much money, okay. However they come to that conclusion. I have read Texas is notorious for outing disabled persons once they get their SSDI but SSI programs abound. Because they haven’t expanded Medicaid or something.
    Anyway, my question is, how do I find out from SSA what exactly I was disabled FOR? Like, what diagnosis was considered disabling? I had like 15 significant disabilities listed from my primary doctor in summaries. My VR at DARS doesn’t have the information he said.
    Can you tell me the process of getting that information, my disabling diagnoses?
    If I have that, I guess I could try to talk at least those specialists into maybe a payment plan so I can see them and have my records notated that I can’t afford to see them every month or even afford the required medications, which, in turn, makes my condition(s) worse. My C-Pap has been the hardest blow. As soon as my Medicaid was stopped, I got that call. Purchase or return machine. I had to return it.
    Anyway, I would really appreciate if you could give me some direction on how to get that?
    FYI, I am also on Ticket To Work (because I just finished a semester of college and want to try to work again part or full tiime) and sort of need that info for applying for some jobs, like Federal, so they know what accommodations they are allowed to offer me based on my approved disabilities.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Paige,

      All your conditions were reviewed and considered when you were approved. If you can get a copy of your claim file, which I am not sure you can once you are approved, the decision memo in file would list the limitations that were considered disabling.

      Right now, I suggest that if it has been less than sixty days since you lost your Medicaid that you investigate getting insurance through the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), which offers government subsidies for premium payments to individuals with limited income. If it has been more than sixty days, you have to wait until the open enrollment period, which runs from November 1, 2016 through January 31, 2017.



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