What are deemed income and resources and how do they affect an SSI application for children?

By / March 3, 2016 / SSI Benefits / 693 Comments

What are deemed income and resources and how do they affect an SSI application for children?

Deemed Income and Deemed Resources
Qualifying for SSI disability is just one step toward getting SSI benefits. Each applicant must also meet SSI’s financial requirements. When the Social Security Administration reviews an SSI application for children, they review for deemed income and deemed resources.

Deemed resources and deemed income refer to the portion of the ineligible parent’s income and resources that are considered available for the disabled child’s support. These amounts are used in calculating your child’s SSI payment and in determining whether the child’s resources are below the SSI resource limit. For a more detailed overview discussion of deemed income and resources, see our article Why Do I Have to Give Information about My Family’s Income and Assets When I Apply for SSI Benefits? For information about how spousal deeming is calculated, please visit What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect SSI Payment Amount and Qualifying for SSI Disability?

Deeming Resources to a Disabled Child
If the applicant is a minor, unmarried child, and the child lives with the parent, a portion of the parent’s resources may be deemed to, that is counted toward, the child’s individual resource limit of $2,000. If the child has one parent living with him or her, then the parent can have $2,000 in countable resources before any of the parent’s resources are deemed. If the child has two parents—natural, adoptive, or step-parent—in the household, then the two parents can have $3,000 in countable resources before any resources are deemed to the child. Occasionally, two parents and a step-parent live in the same household with the disabled child. In that case the amount of countable resources excluded from deeming is $3,000 for the couple plus $2,000 for the third parent.

Many assets are not resources for SSI eligibility. Some examples of excluded resources are property used for self-support, often one vehicle, and a home in which the ineligible parent, eligible child live, and pension funds.

Let’s look at an example. Let’s say that a disabled child living with her mother and step-father. Her mother has assets in her name of $500.00 and her step-father is buying the home they live in and has cash assets in his name of $3,500 for a total of $4,000 in countable resources for the two of them. The house is excluded. The eligible child has a small bank account with $75 in it. This means that the child has $1,075 in countable resources—her $75 bank account plus $1,000 deemed from her parents. Her total resources are below the $2,000 individual limit, so she qualifies for benefits as far a resources go.

It’s worth noting that deeming from a step-parent occurs only if the SSI-eligible child’s natural or adopted parent also lives in the household. Let’s continue the example we were looking at. In April 2016, the child’s mother moves out of the household and the child continues to live with her step-father. Beginning the first of the following month, May 1, 2016, Angela is no longer subject to deemed resources. Only her own $75 account is considered a resource, even though her step-father has more than the $2,000 in assets.

Factors that Determine Deemed Income
The amount of income that is deemed to a disabled child from his or her parent or parents depends on the amount of countable income the parents and any ineligible children in the household have. It also depends whether the parents’ income is earned or unearned, the number of ineligible children in the household, and whether an ineligible parent is sponsoring a noncitizen. Like resources, some kinds of income are excluded from deeming.

Calculating Deemed Income from Parent to Child
Several steps are involved in calculating the amount of income, if any, that is deemed to an SSI child applicant.

First, part of the parents’ income is allotted to care for other children in the household who do not receive public income maintenance. The allotted amount is used to reduce the parents’ income in the deeming calculation. The amount of the allotment per child is equal to the difference between the unreduced Federal SSI Benefit Amount for a couple and the unreduced Federal Benefit Amount for an individual. An allocation is also deducted for any SSI-eligible alien whom the ineligible parents sponsor. In 2017 the difference between the $1,103 couple SSI benefit rate and the $733 individual rate is $368. This amount is reduced by certain types of income the child or sponsored alien may have.

The allocations for the children and sponsored alien are first used to reduce the ineligible parent’s unearned income. If the parent does not have enough unearned income to offset the allocations, the allocations will be applied to the parent’s earned income.

Here’s an example: An ineligible parent has $100 unearned income and $1,600 a month gross wages. The family has three ineligible children, one of whom receives child support in the amount of $200 a month. Here’s how the Social Security Administration would figure out the amount of income to be deemed.

Calculation of Children’s Allocation
$368.00     unreduced allocation for first child
– 200.00     child support
$ 168.00    allocation for first child
+368.00     allocation for second child
+368.00     allocation for third child
$904.00     total children’s allocation

Calculation of Parent’s Deemable Income after Children’s Allocations
$100.00     parent’s unearned income
– 100.00     portion of children’s allocation
0     parent’s remaining unearned income

$1,600.00   parent’s earned income
–    804.00  remaining children’s allocation
$   796.00  parent’s remaining earned income

Next, SSA applies the $20 general income exclusion and the earned income exclusions of $65 and one-half of the remainder to the parent’s remaining $796 income.

$796.00    remaining gross work earnings
–   85.00    $20 general exclusion and $65.00 earned income exclusion
$711.00
/          2     second earned income exclusion
$ 355.50    countable earned income

$355.50     parent’s countable earned income
+        0     parent’s remaining countable unearned income
$355.50     parent’s total income after children’s allocations and general and work exclusions

The last step is to subtract the ineligible parent’s living allowance, which is equal to the SSI federal benefit rate of $735.00 for an individual (or if the child had two parents in the household, the couple rate of $1,103.00). In this example, the parent’s living allowance of $735.00 is higher than the countable parental income of $355.50; therefore, no money is deemed to the disabled child and the maximum SSI benefit of $735 is payable.

A Few Special Considerations
It’s very important to report admission to institutions, changes in household composition and income, marriages, divorces, and births because all these changes can affect deemed income and the amount of SSI due.

Generally deeming does not apply if the parent does not live with the SSI-eligible person. Exceptions include temporary absence, such as a child going away to school or an ineligible parent being absent due to a duty assignment as an active member of the armed forces.

Deeming does not apply if the SSI recipient becomes a resident of an institution and becomes eligible for the $30 SSI benefit rate.

Deemed income follows the general rule regarding when income counts, that is, two months following when it is received except when eligibility is just starting or re-starting after a month of ineligibility or there has been a change in marital status or household composition that affects the deeming formula or a change in living arrangements such as coming out of an institution.

The explanations included in this article address the most common situations. The laws that govern SSI financial eligibility are very complex and detailed. If your child’s SSI application is denied for deemed income or you believe that too much of your income and assets are being counted against your child’s SSI benefits, an attorney experienced in SSI law can be very helpful when you are considering an SSI appeal or even when filing an SSI application for children.

What are deemed income and resources and how do they affect an SSI application for children?
5 (100%) 1 vote

  • Dear Janecia,
    The amount your child will receive depends on the gross monthly income received in the household. If the only income coming into the home is earned income (or wages) you and your new husband can earn up to $4537.00 a month. Social Security will also use any income received by your children to determine the payment amount. If you can provide the exact amount of income you will be receiving, I can provide an estimate of the amount your child would be eligible for.
    Sincerely.
    Jane

  • Dear Ahmed,

    If your wife can withdraw funds paying the taxes and penalty for early withdrawal, then the 401k is accessible to her. In contrast, individuals who are still working for a company that is sponsoring their 401k typically cannot withdraw any funds and, therefore, the account is inaccessible to them.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Ahmed Hossain,
    Pension funds owned by an ineligible parent or parent’s spouse are excluded from resources for deeming purposes, but if your wife can access these funds they may be a countable resource. The claims representative from Social Security is asking for the paperwork in regards to the 401K to determine, if it is a countable resource and will advise you of the decision. You should send in your 401K paperwork and advise Social Security about withdrawing money to purchase a car at the same time. Your claims representative can explain how or if this will affect your son’s SSI benefits.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear Teshia,

    I estimate that your son will receive about $160 a month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Ahmed,

    If the 401k funds are accessible to your wife, the account will count as a resource and your son will not be financially eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If the money is used to purchase a car, then the month after you purchase it, the new, more valuable car will be excluded from counting as a resource and the value of the other vehicles you own will count toward your and your wife’s $3,000 resource limit. If you and she have over $3,000 in countable assets, the excess will count toward your son’s $2,000 limit. Be sure to keep all the paperwork on the 401k withdrawal and car purchase so that you can prove where the money went.

    A note: given that you are out-of-town with the one car, it may be possible to have a second vehicle excluded if it is needed to take your son to medical appointments.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • elizabeth jones

    My net income per 2 weeks is around 1100, my fiance brings in around 450 net per week, we have one child with asd and 2 other children that are not eligible, would my son be approved for any income in ky or do we make too much

    • Dear Elizabeth,
      Social Security will use the gross monthly wages to determine the payment amount. If you, your fiancé, or your children have any other income, this will also be used to determine your child’s payment amount. Using the net amount you provided and assuming there is no additional income in the household, your child would be eligible for about $245.00 a month (not including the state supplement).
      The state of Kentucky may also pay an additional amount called the state supplement. You will have to contact your local Social Security office to determine if your child will be eligible for the state supplement.
      Sincerely,
      Jane

  • Dear Amber,

    As long as your income is low enough that some payment is possible, income received in one month changes benefit amount two months later. This system will keep your child from being overpaid or underpaid if you report your family’s earnings for every month by the tenth of the following month.

    In months that you get two pay checks and your husband gets four, your child will be eligible for $735 federal SSI payment. In months that you have three paychecks and your husband has five paychecks, your child will be eligible for about $239. If there are months that you get three checks and your husband gets four or he gets five and you get two, then the benefit will be an amount between those two. The bonus will add to your earnings in the month received, but only half of work earnings count, so you can figure another $250 countable income from the bonus.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Amber,

    Please clarify your and your husband’s earnings. You say you “bring home $1,300 gross.” Bring home is the amount after taxes and all deductions and gross is earnings before any taxes and deductions. Please write again and give your and your husband’s gross income.

    Thanks,
    Kay

  • Dear Need HELP,

    Your family income is to high for your disabled child to receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If you are in need of health insurance for your children, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) could be an answer, if the government acts to re-establish funding the program, which the current administration wants to de-fund. More information about CHIP is available at http://www.healthcare.gov.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Esmeralda,
    Your son must be receiving a supplemental from the state in which you live and you would have to contact your local Social Security office to have them explain his payment. The federal benefit rate is $735.00.
    Unless your son’s father is residing in the same home with your and your son, your divorced spouse’s income will not affect either your son’s check or your check. If your divorced husband is residing in the same residence with you and your son, his income will be used in deeming to determine your son’s payment. Social Security will also have to determine if you and your divorced husband are holding out as husband and wife. If you are holding out your divorced husband’s income will be used in the deeming to determine your payment amount.
    If your divorced spouse (son’s father) is providing help with your shelter expenses and not residing with you that will be income in the form of cash or in-kind (non cash). Social Security will use the amount of unearned income (cash) he is giving you and exclude the first $20.00 and use the remaining amount to reduce your check. This could be affecting your son’s check too. If your divorced husband is paying the bill directly to the vendors it will be counted as in-kind support and maintenance (non-cash) and the maximum amount your check can be reduced by is $245.00. If you are able to start paying your fair share of the shelter expenses, Social Security will increase your check, but it takes two months for your check to be increased.
    If your son’s father is paying your son child support or if he is receiving any other income from him, that may be reducing the check.
    Because I don’t have enough specific information about the income your and your son are receiving, I am unable to explain exactly how both of your benefits are determined. I need to know more about your living arrangements (who lives in your household) and who is paying the bills. I hope this has helped.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear Esmeralda,
    I need a little more information to answer your questions. Does your son receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits or Social Security benefits from his father’s record: Is he a minor child: If your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) check is below the federal benefit rate (FBR) of $735.00, the check is being reduced because you are receiving some type of income. This income can be in the form of a cash payment or in-kind support (non cash) income. If you are not able to pay your share of the shelter expenses (rent, utilities, food) you are receiving in-kind support, and that will reduce your check. I would have to know what type of income Social Security is using to reduce your payment, before I can explain it to you. The notice you received telling you the check will be reduced in October should explain why the check is being reduced. If you are unsure, contact your local Social Security office and ask them why your payment is reduced. If you can provide more information, repost your question(s) and I will try to explain why your payment is only $160.00 a month. I will be awaiting your response.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Rebecca Lasure

    I am a single mother in Florida with two children, one ineligible and one possibly eligible. I have both earned and unearned income, $3400 from the VA for service connected disability and $800 from part-time employment. I have no idea if we meet the financial guidelines for my eligible child receive SSI. What do you suggest? Is it worth the time and effort to apply? Or is there too much income?

    • Dear Rebecca,

      Your family income is substantially too high for your child to qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). The reason is the VA compensation payment, which would cause ineligibility even if you were not working.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Dear Tasha,

    If you have no other minor children and gross work earnings of $3,000 and no other income, your disabled minor son will receive about $390 a month in Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. The reduction will begin two months after your husband is paid a full months benefits in a single month. Gross earnings for about $2,200 would make a full SSI benefit payable, but it would result in less overall income for the family.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Sha,
    You didn’t indicate, if you have a spouse or any other children living with you. This calculation is for a household with one parent and one eligible child and neither of you have any other income. If your monthly gross earnings are below $1,555.00, your son will be eligible for the full federal benefits rate (FBR). If your gross monthly earnings are $3065.00 or more, he will not be eligible for a check. Any amount between $1,555.00 and $3065.00 will reduce his monthly check.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear Crystal,
    To receive the maximum Supplemental Security Income (SSI) of $735 your mother will have to pay her share of the shelter expenses and buy her own food or pay her share of the shelter and food expenses. Your mother’s share is the total shelter expenses (and food expenses if you share food) divided by the number of people in the household regardless of age. If your household is just the three of you take an average of the shelter expenses (power, heat, water/sewer, garbage, and food if you share it) and rent or mortgage, property tax, and ifrequired by the lender property insurance divide them by three. This would be your mother’s fair share of the shelter expenses and you and your son would pay the remaining balance.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear Women Empowerment,

    If Social Security accepts that the money you received as a bona fide loan, none of the money would be income for SSI purposes. To be bona fide, you have to have a real obligation to repay, so a bona fide loan will have repayment terms defined at the time of the loan, even if it is only that you will repay when your son gets SSI. If he is approved and they count the loan as income and charge some of it to your son, you can file a formal appeal on form SSA-561. The form is available at your local office and online at https://www.ssa.gov/forms/ssa-561.html. (I would expect two-thirds of the child support to be countable income for calculation of his benefits.)

    Sincerely,
    Kay

    • Women Empowerment

      I will have my relative draft a loan agreement even though it was a verbal agreement I will get it in writing because it’s definitely a loan not a gift.

      • Dear Women,
        Provide your loan agreement to Social Security as soon as possible. This is the reference Social Security will use to determine if the loan is a cash loan or will be counted as income to you https://secure.ssa.gov/poms.nsf/lnx/0501120220.
        Sincerely,
        Jane

  • JohnR

    About how much would my 2yo child qualify for in SSI if I gross 1020.79 biweekly, his father grosses 245 weekly and my ineligible son receives child support of 513.19 monthly? Also, I am pregnant due in December, this child will have no income.

    Thanks in advance

    • Dear John,
      If you and his father have no other income, your child would be eligible for about $369.00 a month. After your baby is born, your son would be eligible for about $553.00 a month.
      Make sure you report the birth of your child to Social Security.
      Sincerely,
      Jane

  • Dear Belle,

    Assuming that your son does not have income and that the $1,500 is gross wages or net profit from self-employment, your son will receive the maximum Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Tina,
    If you have no other children your daughters Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment will be about $280.00 a month.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear Women Empowerment,

    Two-thirds of the $200 child support ($133) is income. A $20 general exclusion results in the countable child support being brought down to $113. Keep a record of your loans to prove that you only support you have had has been money that you have to repay.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Nicole,

    Your child should continue to be eligible for $735 if you and your husband get back together. This assumes that your and his countable assets (the 401k won’t count) don’t exceed the SSI limits.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Loreena,
    Ineligible children ‘s resources would not count toward your resource limit of $2,000.00. In most states a minor child cannot enter into a contract, so they cannot be a sole owner of a motor vehicle. A minor typically cannot own property, his or her parents technically own that property until the child becomes an adult. You would have to check with your state laws to determine who would be the owner of the car.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear Alex,

    I am not able to predict whether your daughter will be approved or not. New claims take from two to five months. If you wish, you can call the claims examiner at the Disability Determination Services (DDS) to inquire whether they are waiting for anything from your child’s medical providers or school. If your daughter is medically approved and your family pays all its own shelter and food expenses, your daughter will be eligible for about $692 a month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Dori,
    Kay said you are welcome.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear Dori,

    I believe that the correct answer to your situation is that an error was made when your son’s child support started. Except for the first $20, unearned income that is not excluded counts dollar for dollar to reduce SSI benefits. Child support is unearned income, but one-third of it is excluded. This means that $711 of your son’s child support is income for SSI. The $20 general exclusion is subtracted from the $711 leaving $691. The maximum federal SSI benefit is $735. Subtracting $691 countable income from $735 leaves a federal SSI payment of $44. The extra $32 is likely an SSI state supplement paid by your state.

    When you get the official notice of overpayment, it should show you how every overpaid month has been calculated. That will let you know whether my assessment is correct. At that time, you can file a request for waiver of collection on the basis that the overpayment was not your fault–you reported the child support when it started–and that you cannot afford to repay. Part of the request will be to provide information about your family expenses.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Steve,

    Yes it does. A resource is cash a beneficiary owns and is not legally restricted from using for her support and maintenance. Social Security determined in extreme circumstances she could petition the court for money to use for her food and shelter expenses. An example would be if she were homeless or malnourished.

    You can appeal this decision by filing a reconsiderations (form SSA-561), but you only have 60 days from the date of your notice. Submit with your appeal a copy of the documents that restrict use. If the reconsideration is denied, file a hearing because the account should not be counted until your daughter is eighteen.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear TD,
    Contact your local Social Security Office to find out exactly what your total resources are and how much you exceed the limit of $5,000.00. The outcome will depend on how the $150,000 term life insurance policy is treated under the regulaations. After you reduce these resources below $5,000.00 file a new application or appeal the recent decision. If appealing you only have 60 days to file a reconsideration using form SSA-561.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear Steve,

    SSI rules that govern how trust funds affect your SSI eligibility and payment amount are complex. .You may need legal advice from a lawyer if Social Security has determined the funds are not an excluded resource.
    Generally, if you place your income or assets into a revocable trust, all the assets in the trust will count as a resource. If you establish an irrevocable trust and payments could be paid to you from the trust, then the portion of the trust from which the payment could be made is a countable resource. Certain kinds of trusts, such as special needs trusts and some pooled trusts are excluded from this law. Also, in some circumstances a trust will not count if it causes undue hardship. If you did not have control over the terms of the trust, that is the insurance settlement required it be in trust, it is likely that the trust is not a countable resource
    This reference, SSI Spotlight on Trusts, provides partial information about trusts.https://www.ssa.gov/ssi/spotlights/spot-trusts.htm.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear Cassie,

    During the months that you have no income, your child could qualify for as much as $735 if she has no income and you are paying your family’s shelter and food expenses with your own resources. She will not be eligible for a federal SSI payment in months you receive $3,862. Some states have an SSI state supplement that allows higher income. When you apply for benefits for summer months, the Social Security office will be able to tell you whether your state has a state supplement. If benefits stop during the school year, you can request reinstatement without a new application the following summer.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear TD,
    Assuming that you have no other children and your child has no income, based on income alone, he or she would be eligible for about $62 a month. However, your family assets are still above the SSI limit.
    With two parents in the household, the two parents can have $3,000 in countable resources before any resources are deemed to the child. If you have $6,000.00 in a check account the first $3,000.00 is excluded for the parents and the next $2,000.00 is excluded for the child (if the child has no countable resources of their own). You are over the resource limit by $1,000.00 plus any cash value the life insurance has if it is a whole life policy. If it is term life, the face value is counted and would cause you to be over the limit. If the car is not used for transportation the current market value of the car is counted toward the resource limit. Cash value of the life insurance policy is also countable. Please refer to this regulation, which will explain resources in more detail http://www.socialsecurity.gov/ssi/text-resources-ussi.htm. If you main concern is getting health insurance for your child,you might check to see if your income and assets are within the limits for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Information about CHIP can be found at http://www.healthcare.gov.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear Mm,
    Deemed resources and deemed income refer to the portion of the ineligible parent’s income and resources that are considered available for the disabled child’s support. These amounts are used in calculating your child’s SSI payment and/or eligibility. A home that you own or their father owns and/or buying and live in is an excluded resource.
    One or two of the three automobiles will be a countable resource To figure your resources, Social Security will have to determine the current market equity value of each automobile. That is done by taking the average price of an automobile of a particular year, make, model and condition it will sell for on the open market minus any outstanding loans you may have on the vehicle. The value of is the average price an automobile of that particular year, make, model and condition will sell for on the open market (to a private recipient) in the particular geographic area. The the vehicle with the highest equity value will be excluded, if used for transportation. The equity value of the remaining vehicles will be a countable resource unless you can establish that you must have one for medical for the children and one for work transportation (not possible to use one vehicle). If that is the case, you can try to get one excluded as needed for income production. You and his father can have combined resources in the amount of $3,000.00. Any excess is counted toward each child’s individual resource limit of $2,000.
    An example of how the resources will be deemed. If the total value of countable resources for the parents is $4,000.00, Social Security will exclude the first $3,000.00. This leaves $1,000.00 left for deeming to the child. The eligible child can have $2,000.00 in countable resources. If the child does not have any countable resources he/or she will be under the resource limit. This means with one SSI- eligiblie child who has not assets, you and the children’s father can have up to $5,000 in countable resources. If you have more than that, your child’s SSI will be terminated. However, if you apply for the other two children and they are approved and the children have no assets, you and their father can have $9,000 in countable assets. So what could happen is that your child SSI could be terminated and then reinstated when his or her siblings are approved.

    Several steps are involved in calculating the amount of income, if any, that is deemed to an SSI child applicant.First, part of the parents’ income is allotted to care for other children in the household who do not receive public income maintenance (SSI or local welfare payments) in the amount of $368 per child. That allocation would apply until if and when your currently ineligible children are approved for SSI. The allotted amount is used to reduce the parents’ income in the deeming calculation. This amount is reduced by certain types of income the child may have. Next, $1,105 is allocated for the support of you and the children’s father.
    Assuming that the $1,350 and $3008 income you reference is gross wages and that your children have no income, I estimate that while you have one SSI-eligible child, the SSI benefit will be around $62 in months their father is working and about $151 in months he is receiving unemployment compensation.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear RB,

    She meets the definition of a child, but your income doesn’t affect her check the month after she turns 18. They may be asking for your income up thru the month she turns 18. Deeming to such an eligible child no longer applies beginning the month following the month the child attains age 18.
    The reference for this regulation can be found at https://secure.ssa.gov/poms.nsf/lnx/0501310115. She does have student work exclusions until she is no longer a student or up to age 22. This means she could earn up to $1790.00 in a month up to $7200.00 in a year. This income would not affect her check.
    Sincerely,
    Jane

  • Dear Kimberly,

    I calculate that your children’s SSI benefits would go down by about $2 each.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jason,

    You will not be arrested. You do need to report the work now and provide the pay stubs to prove your earnings. Then expect to get a notice of overpayment. When you do, you can take the letter to your Social Security office and ask to have an amount be withheld from your check each month to repay the overpayment. Then to avoid future overpayments, report your previous month’s earnings (pay checks received) on the tenth of the month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Nish,

    Gross wages count, that means, the amount before garnishment and other deductions and withholding. If you have no other children, your child’s federal SSI payment would be terminated. If you live in a state with an SSI state supplement for children, a small amount of state supplement might be payable. If you have other minor children in the household, tell me how many and the amount of income, if any they have. Also let me know whether the garnishment is for child support and/or whether you pay child support by another method. With that information, I can respond more fully.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Courtney,

    Yes, with one non-disabled child and one disabled child and parental income of $6,500 a month, your child will not be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Tasha,

    If neither of your children has income, your disabled child’s SSI will go down to about $532.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Meisha,

    With $2,000 a month gross wages and no non-disabled children in the household, I estimate that the children’s SSI benefits will drop to about $639 each. If the pay is $1,600, there will be no reduction.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Darsy,

    If your equity in the property will put your family over the resource limit, I suggest that you write up a statement formally requesting that the property be excluded as a resource because it is used for food production for your family and because it will ultimately be income-producing property as well. Be detailed about the garden, eggs, chickens, hogs.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jeanne,

    Your eighteen-year-old will not be factored into the family as an ineligible child unless he or she is still in school full-time. Also the child support is more than the ineligible child allocation, which is in 2017 $369 per child, so none of your income is allocated for the support of your ineligible children. A work-incentive excludes the first $65 of your work earnings and half of the excess, plus there is a $735 allotment for your own support. This would result in $352 being deemed to your disabled child. The child’s income is $352 plus $278 child support for a total of $630. Of that $20 is excluded, so countable income is $610 and the SSI benefit payable would be $125. (This assumes your $2,240 earnings are gross earnings.)

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Tess,

    Two-thirds of the child support that is paid for your disabled child less $20 will count to reduce your child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit. If all $777 is for your disabled child and your income is low enough not to affect his benefits, his SSI will be $237.

    Your income from self-employment would be your net profit after the cost of the product and deduction of work expenses. You would report that you had started working in self-employment and would give an estimate of how much you think you will make per month. You can change the estimate during the year if you see you are actually earning more or less than the original estimate. Then after you file your tax return, you would submit a copy of the Schedule C from your tax return to show your how year’s earnings. At that time, Social Security would make any necessary adjustments to the calculation of your son’s benefits for the prior year. (If you have no other children, you can profit about $1,535 a month before you would affect your son’s benefits.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Staci,

    Your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will not be reduced by your grandson becoming eligible. In months that you receive $300 child support for your grandson, two-thirds, $200, will be countable income. That amount will be reduced by the $20 general exclusion so that $180 of his child support will be counted in calculating his SSI and he will be eligible for $550. ($735 $180).

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Darsy,

    The tax assessed value is not the market value of the property. If the property is paid for, the market value is the same as your equity and the equity will count toward your and your husband’s SSI asset limit. This is true even though you took out a mortgage on your home to buy the property. Note that if your total assets come to more than $3,000, the excess will count toward your son’s $2,000 limit. For clarity about your assets, I suggest that you have a real estate broker write up an estimate of the value of the property.

    If the property causes you to have assets sufficient to make your child ineligible unless it is excluded, you may be able to have the property excluded for two different reasons–one is that you are producing family food on it and the other is that it is income-producing property even though the “crop” won’t be ready to harvest for some time. The second reason may be more difficult to establish if you won’t get income from the property before your disabled child turns eighteen and your assets and income no longer count.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Erin,

    Supplemental Security Income (SSI) does not pay any dependent benefits, so your friend’s grandchildren cannot get benefits because she gets SSI.

    She can apply for Social Security dependent benefits for the grandchildren on her SSDI earnings record only if she has adopted them or both parents are either deceased or disabled and receiving disability benefits.

    If that is the case, the next requirement would be that your friend has worked enough that she is insured for dependent benefits. She can find that out by calling Social Security and asking the amount of her Family Maximum Benefit (FMB). If it is more than her own benefit before withholding for Medicare or taxes and the requirements I just listed are met, the difference between her primary insurance amount (PIA), which is her benefit, and the FMB would be the amount payable for all the qualifying grandchildren. She can get her PIA by looking at the letter she got at the end of last year, which told her how much her benefit would be before any Medicare deductions or by asking Social Security to give her the amount of her PIA.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Ashley,

    A loan is a debt and not a withdrawal so you do not have to report the withdrawal; however, you did need to report the 401k as an asset if you can withdraw from it under your current conditions in anyway that is not a debt that has to be repaid.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Ashley,

    Your only recourse is to formally appeal and take it to a hearing if you have to. You can try to get an attorney, but most Social Security and SSI attorneys deal only in the medical disability part of eligibility. There would be some back pay if you are successful in the appeal and this would be an important point in getting an attorney because the attorney can only be paid a percentage of back pay.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Ashley,

    Based on your statements and the excerpt from the letter you posted, I’d say that an error has been made.

    Income is money received in a month; resources are countable assets that are received in one month and carried over to the next month. Income determines payment amount. Being over the resource limit results in ineligibility.

    For example, the $4,000 was income in March, the month it was received and your daughter was not eligible that month. None of it should be counted as income after that month. (If she got her usual monthly $502 child support that would be added to it and then only two-thirds of the total should count as income.) Any of the money received in March that your daughter had left on the first of the following month counted toward her $2,000 resource limit. If she was not over the limit, the back pay would have no effect on her SSI eligibility for April and she should be paid based only on income she received in April.

    You can have $2,000 in countable assets. (If her father lives in the household, you and he can have $3,000 countable assets.) Any excess is countable toward your child’s $2,000 limit.

    I suggest that you file a formal request for reconsideration of the calculation of your daughter’s benefits on a form SSA-561. Be specific about which months you are appealing. Attach a statement regarding how much income you and she had each month in question and how much you had in assets and she had in assets on the first of each month in question, excluding SSI or other income received on the first.

    Your bank statements and receipts are being requested so that your and her income can be tracked and to help document when your daughter was within the resource (asset) limits. It is absolutely within the law that they be requested because they are needed to determine eligibility. You might attach another copy to your appeal and highlight income and the month ending balances, which will be the first of the month opening balances.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Sharon,

    In 2017, the allotment is $369 for each ineligible child if the child has no income. The $369 figure is reduced by any unearned income the child has. If the child is working, the SSI earned income exclusions apply before a reduction in the allotment is applied.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • You are welcome, Ana.

  • Dear Ana,

    Your child’s benefits will not increase with the new diagnosis; however, when her claim is reviewed for continuing disability, be sure to list the diagnosis and provide information about her condition and treatment.

    If you and your husband stay below $3,801 gross wages and/or net self-employment, your daughter will be eligible for at least one dollar of benefits, which will continue to entitle her for Medicaid. Earnings over about $2,330 will cause her benefits to go down from the maximum payable by one dollar for each two dollars you are over that amount.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Candis,

    As long as you report your earnings by the tenth of the month following the month in which the paychecks are received, you will be able to stay fairly current with being paid the right amount. Check with Social Security to see whether they can put higher estimates for your son’s benefits in advance for the months that you expect to receive the “extra” paycheck. If they can do that, you will not have to return the funds for every month your family is over the income limit.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Candis,

    Once your income makes your son ineligible, it does not matter how much more your income is. However, the situation is a bit tricky in that you have to work the overtime in a pay period or pay periods that will be paid in the checks that are received in the “extra paycheck month.” In other words, income counts when received not earned.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Emily,

    Unless you live in a state that has a state SSI supplement your average monthly income is too high for your daughter to receive SSI. However, if your actual income received in a month varies because there are more pay periods in some months than others, your daughter might qualify in the months you get four weekly or two bi-weekly paychecks and not qualify in months that there was a fifth or third paycheck.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Lauren,

    Please see my response of a moment ago to your first post. In months that your income is $3,600, your stepson’s SSI would be about $260.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Lauren,

    If the family’s assets are within the limits and if your non-disabled child has no income, in months that earned income is $4,000, you disabled stepson will be eligible for about $60 and Medicaid. In months that your income is $4,300, he will not be eligible for either SSI or Medicaid.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Hannah,

    Assuming the children have no income, if both your children are approved for benefits, each will be eligible for about $600 a month. If only one is approved, that one will receive about $630 a month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jackie,

    If the $1,680 is gross earnings, I estimate that your son’s SSI will be reduced by about $62.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Brittany,

    Your child is financially eligible for SSI in terms of family income; however, he must also qualify in terms of family resources (assets). The house you all live in does not count as an asset; nor does the car with the greater equity value (market value reduced by amount on the vehicle). The equity value of the second vehicle, bank accounts, investment accounts including retirement accounts if you have access to them, some types of life insurance and other assets count toward the asset limit, which is $3,000 for you and your husband and $2,000 for your disabled child. If you and your husband have more than $3,000 in countable assets, the excess counts toward your child’s $2,000 limit. Resource calculations can be complicated, so I suggest that you file an application to get a formal determination.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • You are welcome, LaTonya.

  • Dear Kristin,

    If your husband’s $1,900 income is gross wages, your child’s SSI benefits will not be affected by his work earnings.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Trudy,

    A family can have a certain amount of income and the child can still be eligible for the maximum SSI payment. This is especially true if the family income is work earnings because part of the work earnings is not counted. The reason for this is that it is not expected that a whole family would be able to live on the SSI benefit of the child. All children’s benefits are paid into an account in the child’s name because the money belongs to the child.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear LaTonya,

    If your children do not have income, your child’s SSI will drop to approximately $408 per month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jose,

    If you are the only parent or stepparent in the household and you have no other minor children (or in some cases student children) in the household and your $2,560 is gross wages, your child would be eligible for about $232 a month and Medicaid insurance.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Tori

    I have one child in home drawing ssi, can I draw ssdi auxiliary/dependent pay from father benefits on a separate child? Will it reduce child #1 ssi? It’s just the three of us here in the home. I have no other income.

    • Dear Tori,

      When you have no income of your own and are not eligible for benefits on the father’s Social Security record (see below), your second child’s dependent benefits will not affect your disabled child’s SSI.

      If you are eligible for benefits on the father’s record because you are married to him or were married to him for ten years before divorce, your benefits would not reduce your child’s income if the benefit is less than $735. If your benefit is more, it might or might not reduce the SSI. It would depend on the amount of your benefit and the amount of the dependent benefit your other child receives. Even with this situation, your family would have more income than it has now.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Dear Melanie,

    You need to report the assistance from outside the household Two months after the rental assistance from the children’s father started, your son’s SSI will be reduced by $245 because one-third of the rent is countable income to your disabled child. This assumes that the rent is being paid directly to the landlord. If he is giving you the cash, then the question becomes whether the money is your income or child support for the children. Coincidentally, if it is considered child support, the reduction in SSI comes within a dollar of being the same reduction for in-kind (non-cash) support by having the rent paid directly. If the assistance is cash and considered your income only, none would count against your child’s SSI.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Alo,

    Yes, that is correct.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jessica,

    If you are the only parent in the household and you have no other children, with wages of $2,000 gross your son’s SSI will be reduced by about $222 per month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Rachel,

    With one other child in the household, you can make about $1,900 a month before affecting your son’s benefits. For every two dollars over that, his SSI will go down by one dollar.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Alo,

    Your proposed work and earnings would not reduce your child’s SSI benefits.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Chrisanne,

    The amount of disability benefits the children’s father is receiving indicates that he is indeed receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), which is a public assistance program and does not pay dependent benefits. His SSI benefits cannot be garnished for back child support, but I do not know whether he is relieved of the responsibility to pay child support. That would be a question for a family law attorney.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Norman,

    The income you and your son’s mother have is too high for your son to qualify for Supplemental Security Income. If in the future, the survivor benefits end and your wages remain roughly the same, your may qualify for benefits at that time.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Bryan,

    Because the money belongs to the children and because the children do not live with you, you do not have to report the child-support money for your children if you have the money going directly to your oldest child or to a bank account that clearly shows the money belongs to the children and not to you. If you are co-mingling the money with your money, it will show up in your bank account and look like income to you and might make you look like you are over the resource limit.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Wendy,

    Yes, you do have to report your winnings. Your child will have an overpayment in the month you received the money and you will need to repay all funds paid to the child for that month. If the first of the following month the winnings you still have put the child over the resource (asset), limit he or she will not be eligible for that month. Any excess countable assets that you have over $2,000 (assuming you are single or not living with your spouse) will count toward your child’s $2,000 resource limit.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Wendy,

    Your child would be eligible for $735 federal SSI monthly benefit if he meets the disability qualifications.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Kerri,

    Even without counting the children who are in the household part time with $3,000 gross wages, your two children are eligible for the maximum SSI.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Lori,

    I must have made a math error because I agree with the calculation you posted except that the children each have a $20 general exclusion so the first $20 of deemed income should not count, making the benefit $105 each.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Lori,

    I calculate about $268 per child. I suggest that you ask the representative to show you the calculation to be sure that he or she is allowing for two non-disabled minor children.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Lori,

    Your income is within the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) limits for two disabled children and two non-disabled children who are minors. The 401k is a countable asset for SSI only if you can withdraw from it (withdraw, not borrow). I suggest checking with the 401k plan administrator to find out the conditions under which you can withdraw funds while employed if any. If you cannot withdraw even with a tax penalty or can do so only under limited circumstances, request a copy of the plan or a statement from the administrator regarding the restrictions.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Samantha,

    Looking at your income only, I calculate that $795.50 is deemable to your disabled son in months that you get only four paychecks and your husband gets only two. Of that $775.50 would be countable income for your son making him ineligible for a Supplemental Security Income (SSI) federal benefit. Some states pay an SSI state supplement for disabled children. If your state is one of those, then he might be eligible for a small state supplement.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Roxanna,

    No, unemployment is not earned income from work and does not have the same exclusions as work earnings.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Roxanna,

    Your husband’s income is considered in determining his stepson’s eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Your family income is about $1,200 too high for your son to be eligible for SSI.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Christina,

    Your income is too high for your child to be eligible for a federal SSI payment. If you live in a state that pays an SSI state supplement, your child might be eligible. The following link gives lists of states that do and do not pay an SSI supplement for children. http://www.socials.gov/ssi/text-child-ussi.htm

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Jeffrey Shannon Hornbuckle

    My son received SSI for bi-polar. It is my husband (his biological father) myself, our son, my 21 year old son, and my 18 year old daughter will my 21 and 18 year old income effect my sons SSI?

    • Dear Jeffrey,

      If your eighteen-year-old and your twenty-one-year-old are not students, their income does not affect your disabled child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. If they are students as defined by Social Security, part of your and your husband’s income can potentially be allocated for the support of those children, thus reducing the amount of parental income deemed to be available for the support of your disabled child.

      The allocation for each ineligible (non-disabled) children is $368 if they have no countable income. If your older children are students and their income is work earnings, the first $7,200 gross earnings a year (no more than $1,790 in a single month) does not count and does not reduce the allocation. Any work earnings above that would reduce the $368 allocation for their support. So, the older children’s income might or might not indirectly affect the disabled child’s SSI if they are students.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Dear Brittany,

    In months that your child receives $130 child support, I estimate his SSI benefit will be about $247. In months he receives $100, it would be about $334.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Kendra,

    If your $1,400 work earnings are gross wages, your husband will be eligible for about $446 and your children’s SSI will not be reduced due to your earnings.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Stacy,

    For me to give you an estimate of how much your son is eligible for, I need to know the gross amount of his father’s income and whether any of the children have income.

    You said they denied you. Did they have the income proofs that you planned to present at the hearing? if not, I suggest that you go to the office and ask to see a supervisor. Explain that when you appealed your requested a hearing and planned to present the proofs at the hearing and that you were never told you couldn’t have a hearing until after the appeal was denied. Ask that the evidence you have be reviewed without your having to request a hearing in front of an administrative law judge.

    If you filed a formal appeal on a form SSAS-561 and got a formal reconsideration notice and still think a mistake has been made, and you can’t get any satisfaction out of the local office, you can request a hearing on form SSA-501, but you will wait a year or more for the hearing. If you didn’t file a formal request for reconsideration (SSA-561), you would need to file that first and it has be done within sixty days of the notice of overpayment.

    You also have the right to request waiver of collection of any overpayment based on not being at fault with causing the overpayment and not being able to afford to repay. You would not be at fault if you reported all your husband’s wages in the past as changes occurred (or there were no changes until this recent one and you reported the correct amount in the beginning and reported this change by the tenth of the month following the change.)

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear JB,

    Supplemental Security Income (SSI), which you are receiving, does not pay dependent benefits.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Cris,

    Please see my response to your first posting of this question.

    Thank you,
    Kay

  • cris cc

    Any advice would be appreciated. We have 3 children 2 with dissabilities. My son was denied years ago based on my income I work and make 5000/month gross before taxes and benefits are deducted. We now know our third baby has a dissability. Our situation has changed now we have 2 children with disabilities and one without dissability. Since our situation has changed I was thinking of applying again but I’m afraid I would be denied again because I’m being it surely how they would calculated 2 children with dissabilities and one without for a married couple. Also my husband is in school not working at the time. Thank you

    • Dear Chris,

      If you think your assets are within the resource limits for SSI, I suggest that you apply for both disabled children at the same time. If both are found disabled, they will be financially eligible based on your income. However, the claims will not be processed together, so expect the first medically approved child either to be financially denied or held as a pending claim until the second medical decision comes in. I estimate that each child will be eligible for about $170 and Medicaid.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Dear Mandy,

    If your husband’s $3,200 earnings are gross wages before taxes and other withhold or net self-employment profit, I estimate that your stepdaughter’s SSI payment would be about $485.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Sky Try,

    If your child is receiving SSI based on being disabled, I estimate that he will be eligible for about $260 in months that are calculated based on your having two paychecks, plus the National Guard pay. Every six months when you get three checks, he will be ineligible. You need to report income changes by the tenth of the following month.

    I also suggest that you check to see whether his mother had worked enough to be insured for survivor benefits. If so, your son may be able to get Social Security benefits from his mother’s earnings record. Those benefits would not be dependent on family income but they would be counted in determining his SSI eligibility.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jamie,

    Because different kinds of income are treated differently, I suggest that you tell me the amount and type of income your family has including any military housing allowance and I will calculate an estimated benefit amount based on that income.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Lisa,

    If you are receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI), your benefit may be too low for your children to also receive benefits, but if they qualify, their eligibility doesn’t depend on separation or divorce from your spouse. You can call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 and ask the amount of your Primary Insurance Amount and of your Family Maximum Benefit. If the family benefit is more than the primary amount, your children are eligible and you should request an appointment to apply for them.

    If you receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI), SSI does not pay dependent benefits. However, if after your separation from your husband your only income is your $519 Social Security, you might qualify for SSI benefits to supplement your Social Security benefits. The Social Security Administration (SSA) takes SSI applications and administers SSI benefits.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Heather,

    Because your child lives with people who are not his parents or siblings, his SSI can be reduced for receiving in-kind (non-cash) support and maintenance (shelter and/or food) if he does not pay his share of those costs. With seven in the household, his share is one-seventh of shelter and food costs. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax, and if required by the lender property insurance.

    You need to submit proof of the total shelter expenses for the whole household and you and your fiance need to make a written statement regarding how many are in the household, the amount of the food and shelter expenses for the household and how much of your child’s SSI is used for those expenses. You can do this informally with the claims representative if he or she is responsive to the new information or you can file a formal appeal on a form SSA-561 stating that your child is paying his share. Either approach should result in correction of the reduction if an error has been made as it appears to have.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Geralyn,

    Your disabled child will still be eligible for $735.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Sally,

    Please see my response to your first posting of this question.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Sally,

    Yes, your child will be financially eligible based on family income because part of work earnings are not counted as a work incentive and part of the remainder is excluded for your and your husband’s support.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Mari,

    If approved, each of your children would currently qualify for about $307 a month. If their father pays child support after moving out, two-thirds of the child support would count as the children’s income, but the father’s income would no longer be considered in their benefit calculation.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Dino,

    Your income is too high for your child to receive Supplemental Security Income. Depending on the value of the equity value of second vehicle and any liquid assets you might have, you may also be over the resource limit.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Sally,

    I estimate that if you have no other children and your child has no income that the benefit will be about $697.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Raquel,

    I estimate that your child will be eligible for about $482.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Karen,

    If you have no other children, your income is slightly too high for your son to be eligible for a federal SSI payment. If your state has an SSI state supplement, he might be eligible for a small state supplement. You can call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 to find out. If there is, Social Security can tell you whether to apply with SSA or at a state agency.

    Sincerely,
    Kayu

  • Dear VJPounds,

    It appears that your have posted your question twice. Please see my reply to your first posting.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear VJPounds,

    If your children have no income and there is one parent in the household, your disabled child will be eligible for about $532 a month. If there are two parents in the household, the benefit will be $735.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Shyla,

    Your son’s vehicle would not affect your disabled child’s SSI claim as long as your name or another resident parent’s name is not on the car. If the car is in a parent’s name, the parents’ assets would include that vehicle. (One vehicle is excluded; if you have more than one, the one with the lower equity value counts.)

    Your older child’s work income would reduce the amount of his parents’ income that would be excluded for his support if he is earning more than the student income exclusion which is $7,200 a year with no more than $1,790 in one month. With no exclusion or a smaller exclusion for him, more parental income could count as the disabled child’s income.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Darlana,

    You do not say why your son is not now receiving the maximum $735 in SSI benefits, so I can’t answer your question in terms of how much his benefit will be decreased from $560. I can tell you that about $32 of your and your husband’s income will count against your son’s SSI. When the second child is born, there will be no work earnings deemed to your son.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jiller,

    The $3,000 limit is for countable assets you and your husband have. This includes savings, second vehicles and various other things. It does not refer to money received in a month. Money such as wages is income and does not count toward the resource limit unless it is saved and on hand the beginning of the following month.

    With on eligible child and one ineligible child and no child support being paid to children outside the household, gross earnings of $6,000 a month is about $1,650 over the SSI income limit for a family of your size.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Tess,

    Your child does not qualify for a federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment because his father’s income is too high. None of the income can be excluded as an allocation for the other children because you and he are not married so the other children are not his stepchildren. You can check with your local Social Security office or the call center at 1-800-772-1213 to find out whether your state has an SSI state supplement that would allow income as high as his.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Rebecca,

    Your friend can work and earn a certain amount before any of the money she earns reduces her son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. The first $65 ($85 if she has no other income) does not count; half of the excess earnings above $65 (or $85) does not count; and, lastly, part of her earned income ($735 if she has no other income) is not counted because it is allocated for her own support.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Tonya,

    Your son is likely overpaid all the SSI you received for him since you started to work. You likely will be responsible for repaying the overpayment. If it is decided that collection will occur from your son’s benefits, you or he can request that the collection be only partial withholding.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Lakeya,

    I do not understand the reference to “1730.” The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit for you is $2,000 ($3,000 if you live with your child’s father or stepfather); any excess counts toward your child’s $2,000 limit. Real property that you own and do not live in counts toward that limit unless it is income-producing property (i.e., you get rental income off it) or there is some reason you cannot sell it. If you lived in the home, it would not count. If you have the house on the market and are trying to sell it, you may be able to get provisional SSI payments until it is sold. If you get provisional payments, you would have to pay the SSI money back when you sold the house.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jaya,

    I would expect either the portion of TANF payments that is for your disabled child or the SSI to be reduced. SSI reduced by TANF or TANF reduced by SSI.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jaya,

    When you were working with two ineligible children, your earnings were not enough to lower the SSI benefit.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Milan,

    Your children’s SSI will be about $427 each a month. Your family earnings are about $650 over the limit for unreduced benefits.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Ang,

    Please excuse the typographical error. It should read $732.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Lina,

    Assuming your children have no income and that your family is within the resource limits, I estimate that your child will be eligible for about $372 a month.

    The vehicle with the higher equity value will be excluded. Equity value is the retail value reduced by the amount owed on it. The vehicle with the lower equity value will count toward your and your husband’s $3,000 resource limit. If you have excess resources, the excess will count toward your child’s $2,000 resource limit.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Ang,

    Assuming your children have no income, I estimate that your disabled child will be eligible for abour $7322.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Maureen,

    Your son will probably be financially eligible for SSI, at least in the months you are not working. Loans are not income. Report work earnings received each month by the tenth of the month following month. As long as he continues to be eligible, one month’s income will change the benefit amount two months later, so I suggest holding onto some of the work earnings to help fund the month his benefits are cut (if your earnings are high enough to cause a reduction.)

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Arlene,

    Your boyfriend’s income and assets will not affect your daughter’s SSI benefits if he is not her father. However, if he pays more than his share of shelter expenses (and food if you all share food), his extra contribution will affect the amount of her benefits. His share is the total shelter expenses and food expenses if you share food divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax, and if required by the lender property insurance.

    With one parent and no other children in the household and the disabled child having no income, your child’s SSI would start to be reduced if you had earnings in excess of about $1,587 gross per month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jennifer,

    Your son is not eligible because he has more than $2,000 resources. If he starts to spend down, you should keep receipts to show that the money was spent. If you have access to your 401k, it is also a countable resource of which $5,000 would be deemed to your son.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Amanda,

    Your daughter will not be eligible for Medicaid in the same month that she is not eligible for SSI; Medicaid eligibility should resume when the SSI resumes. I suggest that you pay close attention and monitor to be sure that it does, so that you have a current Medicaid number for her for the month that the surgery is to occur.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Carla,

    Your family’s unearned (non-work) income is now in excess of the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) limits. You need to report as soon as possible that he is back in the household and the amount of his income, which will begin to count the month after you got back together.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Maria,

    In months that you get two paychecks, your husband’s benefit would be about $320. In months that you have three paychecks, he will not be eligible.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Maria,

    If you marry and live with your spouse and child, your spouse’s income and assets will be considered in determining whether your child is eligible for benefits and if so for how much.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Steve,

    Based on your current family income, your second child, if approved, would be eligible for the same amount as the first. Their SSI benefits will not reduce your Social Security Disability benefits; the reverse is likely to be true. If you are approved your and your wife’s income may be high enough to reduce the children’s SSI. However, the children could be eligible for more Social Security dependent benefits based on a combined family maximum from your and your wife’s earnings records.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear ProudofmySkinTone,

    In months with no bonuses, your child will be eligible for about $500. In months that you are earning $3,432 and your wife has five days of work, she will be eligible for about $30. (This assumes you have no other children.)

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Kristi,

    The vehicle with the lower equity value (retail value reduced by amount owed on the vehicle) will count toward your and your son’s father’s $3,000 asset limit. Any excess will be counted toward your son’s $2,000 limit.

    In terms of income, your son’s SSI would be reduced to about $348 assuming he is now receiving $735.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jamie,

    Your children’s benefits will not be reduced by $1,020 gross wages per month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear ProudofmySkinTone,

    Please re-post your question telling me who is getting the SSI and whether you have any non-disabled children in the household or are paying child support.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jwalmoak,

    Your husband’s and your income would not be high enough to reduce your child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Check with the food stamp office to find out what the impact on food stamps would be.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Maria,

    So that I can respond, please clarify who will be living together (you say “we planned on moving out” and what your gross income is per be-weekly pay period.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear LaDramaPrincess,

    If the family’s countable assets are below the SSI resource limit and the child has no income, he or she would be eligible for about $702 a month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear NIcole,

    When multiple members of a family receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI), the SSI payments do not affect each other.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Ara,

    If your family is within the resource limit, in months that your husband received four weekly paychecks your daughter would be eligible for about $72 and Medicaid. She would be ineligible in months he got five paychecks. I assume the two 1990s cars are paid for. If so, the retail value of the cars will count toward your and your husband’s $3,000 resource limit. If your resources are over $3,000, the excess will count toward your daughter’s $2,000 limit.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Pandora,

    Your income is too high for your son to be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). The limit of unearned income for one parent and one ineligible child is $3,426.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Heather,

    Assuming that your children do not have income and that you pay for their housing, shelter utilities, and food, your child’s federal SSI benefit should be $735.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jason,

    If you have no other children, your child’s SSI will drop to about $588. To avoid an overpayment, be sure to report by the tenth of the month following your first paycheck.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jolene,

    It is more likely that your severely autistic child will be approved than the child with mild autism. If either or both are approved, each would be eligible for $735 a month unless the child support is for one of them. This calculation considers your earnings of $150 a week added to your husband’s earnings.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Betty,

    I can’t say for sure because I do not know what Social Security will do with your unusual situation, but I think either way your son’s benefit will be $735.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Betty,

    Because legally child support is still being paid, the child support could probably still count as income although only two-thirds of your disabled child’s share counts against him. However, also legally, your husband’s income is subject to deeming for your son’s SSI and it can’t be both. In other words, if SSA counts your husband’s income in determining your child’s benefits, I don’t think they can also count the same money twice and charge child support. Your next step is to report the marriage and change of living arrangements to SSAS and have them sort it out. Then, as quickly as possible, get an attorney to draw up the papers to stop the child support. It should be a simple and not too expensive process.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Shanta,

    If your child is medically approved and your children have no income and no one other than you is paying for his shelter and food, his Supplemental Security Income will be $735 a month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Cookie,

    If both children are approved, they will be financially eligible for benefits.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Betty,

    What you own does not factor into the amount of the payment. Either a family is within the resource limits, the child is eligible; if not, the child is ineligible. If eligible, family income determines the amount of the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment.

    “Subtracting” for the ineligible children is allotting part of your husband’s earnings for their support. Without that allotment, more of your husband’s income would be deemed (considered) available to support your disabled child and the child’s benefit would be lower.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Courtney,

    Your work earnings of $640 gross per month will not reduce your son’s SSI benefits.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Raquel,

    If approved, you son will receive about $672 monthly. This assumes that your countable resources are within the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Betty,

    Based on the financial and household composition information you gave me and my assumption that the child support would stop, your child would be eligible for the maximum $735 if you marry and live with the child’s father. You can calculate the benefit yourself by using the formula in the example that is included in the article above this thread of questions and answers.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

    • Betty

      Would we still be eliagble for Medicaid and food stamps for all three kids? Adding their fathers income?

      • Dear Betty,

        Your disabled child would continue to be eligible for Medicaid based on his SSI eligibility. The social services office that has been serving you should be able to give you an idea about continuing eligibility for food stamps and Medicaid for the rest of your family.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  • Dear Betty,

    Assuming that the child support would stop when you get married and the children’s father moves in and that the wages you listed are gross wages before taxes, your disabled child will be eligible for $735 a month.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Maria,

    Your and your husband’s work income will exceed the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) limits without counting the IHSS payments or counting your child’s child support.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Crystal,

    Two-thirds of your disabled child’s child support will count as income for SSI, but $20 of the two-thirds will be excluded under the general exclusion rule. For example, if the child support is $90, $60 less $20 general exclusion ($40) will be countable causing a $40 reduction in SSI benefits. Whether or not the child support received by your other children affects the SSI benefits depends on whether you have income and, if so, how much and from what source.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Rebeeca,

    Even if Social Security counted your personal income of $355 a month, it would not affect your disabled child’s benefits unless part of it was being paid for his support. His benefit may have been reduced for some other reason. If the award letter does not explain what income is being charged, I suggest you take the letter to your local office and ask for an explanation. (The only thing I can think of is that your son may be getting in-kind (non-cash) support and maintenance in the form of free or subsidized shelter from someone you live with or someone outside your home is paying some of the shelter costs.)

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • You are welcome, Meaghan.

  • Dear Genny,

    Your older child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will not adversely affect the amount your younger child receives.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Cheri Holliday

    Hi my name is cheri i make 292 before taxes a week and i was wondering if my daughter will qualify for ssi payments? I have no assets.

    • Dear Cheri,

      With your $292 weekly gross earnings and no assets, your daughter will qualify financially for the maximum federal SSI payment of $733

      Sincerely, Kay

  • Dear Meaghan,

    In order to answer your question, I need to know the gross amount of your husband’s disability benefit and whether it is Social Security Disability (SSD aka SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Eunice,

    I estimate that your husband’s earnings will reduce your SSI to about $296 and that your daughter’s SSI will remain at $733. This assumes that the $2,080 is gross wages. Note that if he gets paid weekly or biweekly, he will get an extra paycheck every three months (if paid weekly) or every six months (if paid biweekly). The extra paychecks would cause you to be ineligible and for your daughter’s benefits to be reduced.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Ms. Jones,

    Supplemental Security Income (SSI) has no retroactivity for periods before application. If your family now meets the income and resource limits, benefits will be paid only on the current application and will start December 2016 unless you applied on November 1 in which case benefits will start with November.

    • Ms. Jones

      Thank you. Averaging 2800 montly with 3 kids and my rent is 1050. How much do you think i qualify for? Why did they ask about how much i pay for rent?

      • Dear Ms. Jones,

        Assuming that your earnings of $2,800 are gross before taxes and that you are the only parent in the household, I estimate that your child will be eligible for an average of $486 ($488 in 2017) a month. If there are two parents in the household, the benefit would average $733 ($735 in 2017). However, benefit calculations are not averaged across months, so each month the benefit will be different if you earn different amounts in different months. You were asked how much you pay for rent because if a person has rent that is more than income or close to income, it can be a flag for other unstated income often in the form of someone helping the family with expenses.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Ms. Jones

      My income is more than what it was when i applied in 2014. But i stay in a different area and my rent is higher. Are these things that they take in consideration?

      • Dear Ms. Jones,

        As noted in my previous reply, each month will be calculated separately. Your higher rent will not be considered in the calculation of benefits.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  • Dear Monique,

    An overpayment can occur even if your rate of pay has not changed. Your pay in one month affects the amount of your child’s SSI benefit two months later except if your earnings are high enough to make the child ineligible. If that occurs, the child is overpaid in the month your earnings were too high for payment.

    This can occur with no change in pay rate if you are paid weekly or bi-weekly (every two months). If you are paid weekly, every three months you get five pay checks spiking your income for that month. Similarly, if you are paid bi-weekly, every six months your get three checks instead of two. A way to avoid overpayments in the future is to ask Social Security to project out your estimated earnings to show your higher earnings in the months that they will occur.

    If you don’t think what I described is the cause of the overpayment, your can request a printout or other list of all your earnings as posted to your daughter’s claims record. That will allow you to see whether the information the computer is using to calculate is correct.

    Regarding the current overpayment, if you can’t afford to repay, you can request a waiver of collection based on inability to repay and the fact that the overpayment was not your fault (you reported on time) and you didn’t realize that your child would be overpaid because you reported on time

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Amy,

    Yes, your calculations are correct. Your child will continue to be eligible for the maximum federal SSI of $733 ($735 in 2017) because the exclusions allowed exceed your husband’s income.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • lakeya jones

    Hey Kay . I am a single mom & have 3 kids my daughter just got approve for ssi . and I make about 2.200 month . Bout how much will u think she will get.

    • Dear Lakeya,

      If your $2,200 income is gross wages and your children do not have income, your disabled child will be eligible for $733 a month ($735 in 2017).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Tasha vines

    My husband receives RSDI and our son receives payment off his record. We are separated and the money I receive for my son I give to him to maintain my son while in his home. We share custody. He receives $1150 a month and $722 for our son I make $3100 a month my disabled daughter should receive $400 a month in child support but he averages $270 a month. My question is does my sons income count for my daughters SSI? Can he be included in my home without including his income? If eligible what approximately will my daughter receive

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tasha,

      Your son’s income is considered in determining how much of your income counts in calculating your daughter’s benefit. It works this way: in the months your son is in your household, the calculation of how much of your income that is deemed (considered) available for the support of your disabled daughter would be reduced (making your daughter’s benefit higher) if your son did not have income exceeding the allocation for a non-SSI-eligible child, as he does. Because there is no allocation for him when he is in your home, it does not matter whether your son is away at his father’s with his Social Security correctly following him or he is in your home and you keep his money for him while he is with you, either way none of your income will be allocated for his support.

      You should report the changes in your disabled daughter’s child support every month that a change occurs. The report should be made by the tenth of the following month. Unless they cause ineligibility, changes in income change payment two months later. For example, a change in November, reported by the tenth of December, will change your daughter’s benefit for January.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Mrs D

        My son was diagnosed with Autism. I have 2 other children with no disabilities. I don’t work but my husband does and he makes 3510.00 gross. We have about 1000.00 in assests if that. About how much should my son receive in benefits if approved? I live in Virginia.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Mrs. D.,

          If your child is medically approved, I would expect his SSI benefit to be about $255.50.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Tatiana

    My daughter receives $733 in ssi for her disability. I am wanting to get married and would like to know how or if her payment will be affected. He makes 320 a week before taxes and I make 320/monthly cash. So about 1600 a monthly and have 3 other children not on disability. We live in Texas.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tatiana,

      With the number of children in your household, your income and your husband’s income combined will not cause a reduction in your child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Be aware that your and your husband’s assets will also be evaluated to see if the family is below the asset limit. You and he can have $3,000 in countable assets. If you have more, the excess will be counted toward your child’s $2,000 limit. Cash, bank accounts including accessible retirement accounts are among countable resources. If you and he have more than one vehicle, the vehicle with the lower equity value will count toward the limit. (Equity is the retail value less the amount owed on it.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Christina

      Hi, I make about $3,000 after taxes every month. My rent is about $1,400, car payment $370, plus I have my other bills like cable, Internet and phone bill. I have a son who is 5 years old with Down Syndrome. Is I apply for SSI for him about how much will he receive?? I live in Califnoira.

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Christina,

        Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit calculations use gross pay before taxes and other deductions. It is possible that your income is above the limit. If you’d like to tell me your gross income, I will let you know.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Chrissy

      I have 2 children who receive ssi, my 3rd child is in the process of getting it. I work part time grossing 800.00 a month. If I marry my youngest child’s father and he earns 2,400 a month would it change the amount they receive or make them not eligible. Both children receive 733.00 a month. He is not their father, only my youngest.I know if I get married his income will be counted into my children’s ssi payments.

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Chrissy,

        If you marry and your third child is not approved for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), your two disabled children’s benefits will be reduced to about $610 a month. If your third child is approved, all three would receive about $598 each.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

        • Tracie

          I recently applied for SSI for my son. He is a four year old shaken baby survivor who has been diagnosed with sensory processing disorder and ADHD from the shake. I am a single mother who is a teacher. I gross 4,100 a month. I only bring home 3,000 a month after taxes and insurance. I have another child who is 16. My house payment is 1,163 dollars a month. Will my son be eligible for monthly benefits or is my income too high? I applied and waiting to hear back.

          • Kay Derochie

            Dear Tracie,

            Your gross income is close to $700 over the limit. If health insurance is needed, you might look into the Childhood Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  • Michelle W

    Hi my twin preemie girls were deemed ineligible due to excess resources, we had 13000 in the bank at the time from sale of a second property. Since the girls are medically fragile I am not able to return to work and we are living off that money in addition to my husbands salary-55k per year. Were are down to 8000 and use about 1500 a month to suplement my husbands income. My question is at what point would they become eligible to receive benefits, when should I file a reconsideration? We have 4 children total. Thanks Michelle

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Michelle,

      Assuming that your twins do not have assets, you and your husband can have $7,000 countable assets because the excess over your $3,000 limit will be split between your two disabled children and counted against their individual $2,000 limits. You will probably have to file a new claim for each because their denial was not an error. You can file in the first month that your assets drop within the limit. Be prepared to show how the money was spent or minimally, bank statements showing that the balance dropped each month.(Having ineligible children does not increase the resource limit.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • karla Calero

    Hi im a single mother and i have child who receives ssi and i also get 207 hours of hiss for him. I would like to get a seasonal job in december on saturdays. But i afraid his ssi will be affected will his amount be lower? or can he loose it? thank you

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Karla,

      To answer your question, I need to know how much your gross earnings will be per month when the seasonal work and the In-Home Support Services (IHSS) wages are added together.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Question4u

    My entire family is on medicaid, my son getting SSI puts us over the income limit. My question is, does SSI count as income for our family medicaid?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Question4u,

      I don’t know the answer to your question. I suggest that you ask the Medicaid office. Your son’s SSI should assure him of continuing to be eligible for Medicaid. If, in fact, Medicaid for the rest of the family is going to be terminated, you can apply for insurance through the Affordable Care Act. If your income is just a bit over the Medicaid limit, you may be eligible for a government subsidy that would give you insurance for a small premium. You can apply now through December 15 for coverage to start in January or through January 31 for later start date. If you lose insurance coverage during a different time of the year, you can enroll during a sixty day special enrollment period. For more information to enroll online, visit http://www.healthcare.gov.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Mom2-4boys

    My son got approved for SSI. My husband and I make $3700 a month and we have four children total. Are assets are only around $500. Do you have an idea of how they determine the amount that he will receive?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Mom,

      I estimate that your child will be eligible for about $586. The formula used is show in the article where you posted your question.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Mom2-4boys

        Oops, I meant $3200 and I will check out the formula. thanks!

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Mom,

          With $3,200 gross wages and three ineligible children, your son would be eligible for the maximum $733.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • angelia fogle

    What would happen if my son a and I are both on disability. I got married so now it’s me my son and his step father in one house. He makes about 1500a month. And I have to pay 370 in child support? I’m sorry if my question is confusing

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Angelia,

      Please clarify a couple points for me so that I can respond.

      1. Do you receive Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability.
      2. Is your son receiving benefits as a dependent on your Social Security record or SSI because he is disabled.
      3. Is the $1,500 gross before taxes or net take home? If net, what is the amount of the gross earnings.

      Thank you,
      Kay

  • My 10 year old granddaughter is receiving SSI benefits based on her deceased mother’s SS record. Her mother was receiving SS disability income at the time of her death. My son is unemployed and raising my granddaughter. He lost his job of 20 years trying to take care of my ill daughter in law who was dying of kidney failure.

    My granddaughter receives $800 SSI each month. If my son and granddaughter move in with me and my husband, will this affect my granddaughter’s SSI benefit? We live in Texas.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Brenda,

      Your granddaughter is not receiving SSI, which is Supplemental Security Income, a needs-based public assistance program. She is receiving Social Security survivor benefits because she is a minor child. She and her father living with you will not affect her benefits. Her father does need to report the new address, so that he gets routine mail from Social Security. If the payment is going direct deposit to a bank account and he is going to change banks, he should keep the old account open until he receives a payment into the new account.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jamie

    I have 2 children with autism and am just now applying for SSI for them both. My husband is currently unemployed, but starts work in 2 weeks, and I am a stay at home mom. What is the maximum amount of income my husband can make monthly to still qualify for SSI for my children? Does it matter how many disabled children are in one household? We live in CA.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jamie,

      Assuming you have just the two children, the maximum amount of parental earned income allowed for one child to be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is $4,158. If both children are approved, the maximum is about $5,255.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Marie2010

    My husband make 1800 a month I am going back to work part-time will my son ssi be cut down or stay same… if our income is no more then 3,000.00 we stay in Florida… can they cut him off

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Marie,

      Please see my answer to your earlier question, which was posted earlier today.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Marie2010

        Ok I have a child with speech problem n on clonidine to sleep at night… I have Iep on him and he gets therapy for speech twice a week at school n at rehiblitation. Is he eligible for ssi… can both kids get ssi or will one child ssi get cut down … my husband works n make 1800 a month will his income affect anything… one child gets ssi … I know the more income u have a chance of getting cut down

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Marie,

          I am not able to predict whether your second child will be medically eligible for benefits. If he is approved, each disabled child will be eligible for $733.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

      • Marie2010

        Ii posted don’t see nothing

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Marie,

          Questions are not visible until they are answered, which is typically within twenty-four to forty-eight hours,occasionally longer. You posted on November 3 and your question was answered today, November 4.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Alisha Loflin

    I have a 2yr old daughter she was approved for ssi they said she will get back pay 2,500 in November and the other half of the back pay in may 1,500 my question is they asked for all my boyfriends info cars and everything he isn’t her father and he owns two cars and isn’t working right now and neither am I we have two other children in the home so their are five of us in the home I was wanting to know why are they using my boyfriends information and why is my child only receiving 651 a month in ssi thank you in advance

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Alisha,

      Your boyfriend’s income and assets should not be considered in determining your child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit amount because you and he are not married and, therefore, he is not her stepfather. You can file a formal appeal disagreeing with his income and assets being considered in the child’s eligibility. The basis of the appeal is that your are not married to him and he is not the child’s father or stepfather. I don’t have enough information to know why your child’s benefit is less than the maximum unless it is because of your boyfriend’s or your income.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Ty

    Good Morning,

    My 6 year old was just approved for SSI, I make $2100 per month, single parent with 3 other children in the home under 18. I receive no child support my rent is $1500 per month, electric is $320 per month water bill $150 every 2 months. No savings or other assets. Can I get an estimated benefit amount.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ty,

      Assuming that the three other children are your children, your child will be eligible for $733 a month.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Alfredo

    Hello, is it true that ssi views a couple living together, who are not married, as common law? I have been with my girlfriend for 6 years. She has 3 childern from someone else, 2 of which get ssi. I have one child with her who does not get ssi. Recently she was asked to do an evaluation and all of the sudden they want my income verification. I we ahead and gave them a statement for the last year and now they want my check stubs every month. When i asked why they said its because we are common law, but only a few states recognize common law and im in California whichnis a state that does not recognize it. Anyway the worker at the ssi office said if i do not report my income that the kids will get cut off. Does that sound right?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Alfredo,

      Please see my response to your first question. I suggest that your girlfriend file a formal appeal contesting the request for your financial information. Put on the appeal that she is appealing the request for your financial records because you and she are not married under state law and you are not the father of the disabled child. State on the appeal 1) California does not recognize common-law marriage; and 2) even it if did, you she and you do not consider yourselves married and do not present yourselves to the public as being married so you would not be common-law married. Your girlfriend should keep a copy of the appeal and request a written receipt for the appeal (a copy with SSA’s date stamp or other receipt.) If they don’t want to take the appeal because no formal decision has been rendered, state that you have been threatened with termination of benefits and you are appealing the request for documentation that is not relevant to head off termination. If the representative continues to refuse taking the appeal, ask to see a supervisor or manager.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Alfredo

        Thank you very much.

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Alfredo.

  • DaniellaP

    We are a family of 5. I am married with 3 children. One of my children receives ssi of 733. Two of my children are not on benefits. My youngest child was just born in August. My rent is $800 a month and I receive 159.80 a week for my son that is on ssi.

    I got married on 01/28/2016.
    My husband was in school and didn’t move in with me til June/16/2016.

    I had reported the marriage to Social Security. They changed my name and all but never reported the change to my son’s case. My husband hasn’t worked since he has moved in with us is June.

    Every year when the social security office call me, I always tell them that I do receive child support for my son who’s on ssi but it’s not consistent. They never asked me how much nor how often I received it.

    Today I contacted the social security office because I had received a call about an appointment. I was told that the call was not for me but she wanted to correct my info because my case was still showing that we live in Georgia even though we live in Florida. I was confused because that means I can’t bring my son to the doctor here in Florida until the address is corrected and I would be responsible for all bills incured in Florida.

    The worker asked me to bring in a print out of child support payments for my son for the last two years.

    As I reviewed the print out, I realized that for the most part, I was receiving the payments regularly. But about twice a year, there’s like 3-4 months that I did not receive any payments.

    From my understanding, ssi did not take decrease my son’s ssi payments due to them not having that record. I know that when the workers call, the calls are monitored and if the social security office review the calls, the office will see that I never denied receiving child support for my son.

    The worker from today also told me to let her know when my husband becomes employed but I don’t understand why and how my husband’s income would have anything to do with my son’s ssi when my husband is not my son’s legal/biological father.

    My questions are.
    1. How much backpack will the social security office say that I owe for the last two years that I’ve received child support payments for my son who is on ssi? I’ve received about 159.80 a week for about 40 weeks for each of those two years. 159.80×40. X 2. With one child who isn’t receiving ssi. September 2014-September 2016.

    2. How does giving birth to my third child in August effect my son’s ssi calculations for the second year? September 2015- September 2016?

    3. My husband didn’t move in with me til June 2016 so based on your article, I know that all calculations will be based on a one parent household from September 2014-August 2015, and September 2015- May 2016. Does June-Sept 2016 add anything to help with the overpayment?

    4. With 3 children, two ineligible and one eligible, $159.80 a week of child support and my husband, how much will my new monthly payments be with no other income? Rent $800 a month.

    5. When my husband find a job, how much will social security take out of my son’s income? 5 people I’m household, 3 total children, 2 ineligible, 1 ssi child. Rent $800 a month. Please give me an estimate for $1400 monthly gross and $1800 monthly gross.

    6. When I find a job, how will my income be calculated in addition to $159.80 of child support for my ssi child, two ineligible children and my husband? If I make $1000 a month.

    I live in Florida.

    Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Daniella,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits are calculated month by month based on the income received in a month by the members of the household, the number of parents and stepparents in the household, and the number of minor non-disabled children being supported. Accordingly, I can provide only a general, averaged calculation of how your child’s benefits may be recalculated. I will answer your questions in the order you asked them.

      1. I will answer your question the way you asked it; however, you will be receiving an averaged answer, not the actual amount of child support that will be counted in certain months; the months you got four child support checks will be calculated differently than the months you got five child-support checks. Two-thirds of your disabled child’s child support counts as income. Accordingly, the countable child support is about $106.59 a week. $106.59 x 40 = $4,263.60. Forty weeks is about 9.25 months. Each month an additional $20 general exclusion applies. $20 x $9.25 = $185. Subtracting the general exclusion from the countable child support ($4,263.60 – $185) results in an overpayment roughly $4,078.60. But keep in mind this is averaging and the actual calculation will be done month by month.

      2. Given that neither you nor your husband has any income, the addition of another child to the household does not have any effect on the calculation of your son’s SSI. When one of you gets income, $367 of parental income will be allocated for the support of the child.

      3. Your husband will be considered a part of the household for calculation purposes the month after he moved in with you, but as stated above with no parental income there is no impact as long as the two of you do not have more than $3,000 in countable resources (assets). His assets will be combined with yours to determine whether your child meets the resource limit. If you and he have more than $3,000 in countable resources, the excess with count toward your son’s 42,000 limit.

      4. In months that your child receives four child-support payments his benefit will be approximately $327; in months he receives five payments, his benefit will be approximately $221.

      5 and 6: With two other children in the household, gross work earnings of $2,800 ($1,800 for your husband and $1,000 for you) will result in no income being deemed to your son and his benefit will be the same as listed in #4 above.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Karen S.

    Hi,
    I am 26 years old, currently living with my parents and two siblings, who both receive SSI. One of the siblings is under 18. I am planning on getting married and am thinking about working to help pay off the wedding. I do not wish to move out until I am married. Will this income affect my siblings benefits?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Karen,

      Your income and assets do not affect your siblings Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and do not hve to be reported.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Karen S.

        Thank you!

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Karen.

  • Kristy N

    I am a single mother of three children, two are disabled and currently receive SSI. They will soon be receiving $2,339/mo in child support. Will the child support be divided evenly amongst my 3 children or will they deduct $365 for the non-disabled child and divide the balance between my two children with disabilities. I have no income, due to no child care coverage for my disabled son. I’m trying to figure out if they’ll be receiving $230.62 each or $91.71 each from SSI. Thank you!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kristy,

      I estimate that each of your disabled children will be eligible for $232.00 a month. The $2,339 child support will be divided equally among the three children for whom it is paid. This results in each child receiving $779.66. Of that amount two-thirds is counted as income to each disabled child. ($779.66 x .667 = $520.03). The $20 exclusion is applied leaving $500.03 countable income. $733 – $500.03 = $232.97 payable.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Adrienne Paul

    Hi I have a 15-year-old mentally & physically (retarded) delayed, who is life dependent. I received benefits for him up until I married my husband in 2009… they said my husband made too much money for my son to get benefits, my husband never adopted my son he still has a biological father out there somewhere..3 years ago is blinded himself thru self stimulating behaviors, he has a feeding tube, is non verbal & requires someone one-on-one for every thing he does.. I just can not see how he doesn’t qualify for benefits … my husbands in the military and they say he makes too much money… these were the laws back in 2009 has anything changed should I try to reapply? Would I have any success?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Adrienne,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a public assistance welfare program for disabled and aged individuals with family low income and assets. If you want to tell me your husband’s gross wages and a list of your and his assets, I’ll give you an idea of whether your son might be eligible. Another possibility is to apply at your local state or county social services for In-Home Support Services (IHSS) payments for caring for your severely disabled son. I do not know whether that program also has income limits to qualify.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Angela

    I was just approved for SSI for one of my children who is disabled and currently still waiting for the next step for his SSI. Im a single parent of two. My question is that I make approximately $600 every two weeks, will my income affect my child future SSI?? And how much will his SSI be based on my income?? Also I do receive CHS from his father 2x a year his CHS is order for $290 a month and my other child I received $200 a month. Thanks you

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Angela,

      In months that your children do not receive child support, your disabled child will be eligible for $733. In months that child support is paid, I estimate the benefit will be $509. (Only two-thirds of the disabled child’s child support is counted to reduce benefits.) Income counts two months after it is received, so be sure to report the child support when it is received to avoid overpayments.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Angela

        Thanks Kay for the info. My son father doesn’t pay any CHS throughout year. The only time he pays is in May and November of every year. The payment of CHS in those two months are about $1,400 in the back up CHS. How does this affect my child’s SSI benefits and by what about amount?? His father does not pay on CHS December -April and then June-October.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Angela,

          In May and November, your child will not be eligible for SSI because about $913 of the $1,400 will be countable income in those months.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Laura

    Hi I live with my boyfriend and I have no income. My question is if I apply for disability for my five year old son will they go off of my boyfriends income even though he is not my sons father and we are not married? My ex has been ordered to pay child support for my son I will be applying for and also our daughter but doesn’t pay it. So would that even factor into this?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Laura,

      Your boyfriend’s income and assets will not affect your child’s financial eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Only child support that is actually received counts as income. If your disabled child starts to receive child support, two-thirds of the support will count in determining his benefit amount.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Alfredo

        I have lived with my girlfriend for 6 years, her 2 kids get ssi. Recently they have asked for my income verification even though i am not the father of those 2 kids. We do have a daughter together but she is not on ssi. Ssi told my girlfriend that we are considered to have a common law marriage. Is that correct?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Alfredo,

          Common-law marriage (legal marriage without a license or ceremony performed by an authorized party) only applies in states that recognize common-law marriage. If you live in one of those states, to be considered married based on common law, you and your girlfriend would have to “hold out” to the public as married. That would mean that you both told everyone you were married and that you listed yourselves as married on all legal documents. If these things do not apply, then you are not married under common law and your income is not considered in determining your girlfriend’s child’s SSI benefits. If the Social Security representative persists in determining your income counts, your girlfriend should file a formal appeal.

          (Current common-law states are Colorado,Iowa, Kansas, Montana, New Hampshire, South Carolina,Texas, and Utah–also under some circumstances in Alabama, Rhode Island, and Oklahoma.)

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Spring

    Hello.i have a 6 yr high functioning autistic son.i receive chd support by his father recently passed. I’ve applied for death benefits for him. His father disinherited hi. Frm trust and will. My chld support was 1400. I was recently let go frm work. I o ly get 1050 a Mo the from unemployment.do u hv an idea of what I wld get from his dad Ssi.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Spring,

      The disinheritance will not affect your child’s Social Security survivor benefits. Your child will be eligible for 75% of his father’s primary insurance amount if he is the only survivor receiving benefits on the account. Social Security may be able to tell you that amount.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Vanessa

    I recently applied for my child that has autism ADHD and is bipolar , I was approved but still waiting. We are a family of 4 which is my husband a child we have together and one from past relationship which is the one I applied for. I have no income besides 200 child support for him and my husband makes 600 weekly. What will be my expected ssi check for monthly ?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Vanessa,

      I estimate that your child will be eligible for about $435 in months that your husband has five weekly paychecks and about $733 in months he has four paychecks.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Tasha

    I have 2 children thay receives SSI payments one of my children receive Child Support. My question is does the amount of Child Support that Social Security count vary by state?According to the SSA it says that they only count 1/3 of the child support and by law they don’t count $20.00. Im in Texas and on my SSI letterr it clearly states that they don’t count 2/3 of the child support. I just want clarity on this .
    Thank you .

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tasha,

      It is correct that only one-third of the child support is excluded, plus the $20 general exclusion. The amount does not vary state to state. You can read about this in Social Security regulations at https://secure.ssa.gov/poms.nsf/lnx/0500830420. It might be helpful to the agency to point out the incorrect information in the letter because if it is a form letter the incorrect information is going out to more people that just you.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Moka

    My daughter lives in my home along with my three other children. I receive SSI for my daughter. If I begin receiving child support for the referenced daughter and one other child how will this effect her SSI payments? How much child support is deemed income?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Moka,

      The two-thirds of the child support paid for your disabled daughter will count as her income. Additionally, she has a $20 exclusion, so if the child support were $100, she would have a $46.67 reduction in her benefits. The other child’s support counts fully and reduces the allocation from your income for his or her support. If you have income, the support may or may not affect the disabled child’s benefits depending on the amount of your income. If you have no income, getting child support for the non-disabled child will not affect anything.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Janna Nicholas

    Hi. I am on regular disability and have been for the last 15 years. I have a 16-year-old daughter who lives with me and is on SSI. My only income is my disability (approx $1000 a month), $207 a month in food stamps and my daughters $400 she draws off of my disability and then $48 in SSI. I am getting worse by the day. I am wondering what would happen if I gave either guardianship or custody of my daughter to my son who is about to get married to his fiancé who is in the military? Will my daughter lose her SSI? I am assuming so since it would go based on my new daughter-in-laws army pay. However, I just don’t know what to do. My minor daughter has a LOT of medical issues and I know she will be reevaluated at some point to see if she is still disabled as an adult. I don’t see how she couldn’t be as she is worse and has more diagnoses now than the few years ago when she first was accepted onto SSI. ANY advice on navigating so she doesn’t lose her insurance and stuff is helpful and appreciated. I have heard if I give or sign over custody to my other child and new spouse, my disabled daughter can be covered under Tricare. Sure, she won’t get SSI anymore.. but would she still be able to draw her $400 a month off of me for my disability? Also, to compound matters, we need to know exactly what forms for custody to do as I need to give them honest custody anyway as they also want to care for me. I need more surgery and they are taking care of us now. Thanks, in advance, for your help.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Janna,

      Your daughter’s Social Security dependent benefits will continue regardless of who has custody of her, but your son would need to apply to be payee to receive and manage her benefits.

      Your son’s and his wife’s income will not be considered in determining your daughter’s SSI eligibility nor will your income once she is no longer living with you. What could cause her SSI benefits to stop would be her not paying her share of shelter and food expenses. Her share is the total expenses divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

      About three months before your daughter turns age eighteen, apply for Childhood Disability Benefits (CDB) for her so that her dependent benefits on your earnings record can continue. At the same time, request the SSI adult disability review to see whether the SSI can continue.

      Consult with a family law attorney to find out how to grant guardianship of your child to her brother.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Stephani Rojas

    Hi my son gets Ssi 733 a month I have 4 kids total my daughter gets survivors benefits and my youngest son is applying for his Ssi my rent is at the moment 194 I plan on starting work and school my earned income should be about 1680 a month gross will this affect any of my children’s benefits or eligibility. Just wondering because I’m on a budget thanks

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Stephani,

      If the $1,680 is gross earnings, your work will not affect you children’s benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Laura

    I have 4 ill children…i receive ssi for one as we have known about his condition since he was a baby..i plan on applying for ssi for the other 3 that are affected with this nasty disease.. Will i be able to get ssi for all 4 and will the benefit amounts be the same? Or lower?. My hubby is the only one employed and he makes about $2000 month…we are a family of 9…

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Laura,

      If your children meet the medical requirements for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), they can all receive benefits. Given the size of your family and the family’s income, I would expect the children to receive $733 each.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Memory

    My husbands income is around $3177 a month, and my income is approx $600 a month. We have one ineligible child, and one eligible child who is disabled. I will become unemployed in the next couple of months. If her disability is approved, what will her benefit be (if any) based on our current income vs when I become unemployed and we have only my husbands income?
    Thank you for your time.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Memory,

      Based on your husband’s income alone,I calculate that with one ineligible child in the household, your disabled child is financially ineligible for Supplemental Security Income benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Heidi

    Hello I am a single mother with five kids my daughter is disabled and just got approved for social security my question? I make 480.00 a week for my own income will she still qualify for her full benefits my income is the only income in our home !

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Heidi,

      Please clarify your income for me so I can respond. You say you were approved for Social Security and that you “make $480 a week.” Do you mean $480 a month, not week, in Social Security?

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Michele

    I want to except a full time job but im trying to figure out how much money Im allowed to make before my son would lose any off his SSI benefits. He gets 733.00 monthly. I live with his father who is unemployed at this time and my 14 year daughter who is not disabled. We live in Pittsburgh PA. My part time job (that i would quit if i take the full time one) and 138.00 in child support i receive for my daughter is our only income now! Full time starting at 10 hr…would that affect his SSI?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Michele,

      A full-time job forty hours a week at $10 an hour would not affect your child’s SSI benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Katie

    I am married with 4 children. My husband has been deemed disabled by the state of AZ however does not receive any checks because of my income. I am the only one working and I get $2908 a month from work plus $1379 disability from the VA. One of my sons has a disability however I am not sure weather or not to go through with the application as I am afraid they will deny us for my income. What are your thoughts? Thank you for any assistance

    • Katie

      Follow up to my question..I pay $1198 for my house and my kids ages are 4,4,9 and 11

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Katie,

        Please see my response to your first post.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Katie,

      If none of your children have income, your disabled child may be eligible for about $150 a month in Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Tamarra

    Hello,
    My children receive child support monthly in the amount of 342. Of my two kids one is disabled moderately to borderline severely and receives 639 monthly in disability. Sadly, her younger sibling has a similar diagnosis and I am unsure of whether to apply for disability for sheer fear that it will be a flat out denial. My question is with these being the only two incomes, we stay with my father who receives retirement and his wife who is disabled. Will they consider their income snice we stay in their home even though I am my son’s adult payee? Also, will they say those two incomes are too much and give him nothing, or give him at least something? Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tamarra,

      If you think that your second child’s illness is resulting in developmental or functional limitations, there’s no reason not to file an application. If the child is approved, his or her benefits will be calculated separately from your older child’s benefit. Your father’s and stepmother’s income does not affect the calculation your children’s SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Anna bennett

        Hi. Me and my husband have 4 kids living with us. He is the only one working and one of my kids gets 661 a month ssi. My husband has just starting paying 420 a month in child support fof kids from a previous marriage. Will that effect my sons ssi

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Anna,

          When you report the child support your husband is payiong, your child’s SSI should increase two months later, assuming your child’s benefit is not being reduced to to his own income.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Samantha

    This may get a little lengthy… My husband and I both earn a salary. He gets 1000 a week and I get 400 a week. We are couriers using our personal vehicles for our job. My husband puts approximately 110,000 miles a year on his truck while I will do about 65,000 a year. He is court ordered to pay total 1,204 a month for child support and medical support. we do not pay for gas but we do pay for all of the matienence on our vehicles. Does the miles and wear and tear play into the income at all? What I understand it goes by gross income minus child support. But it seems to me like we are out of luck with the unreimursed employer expenses which we claim on a schedule a form. And that seems very unfair because we have these expenses so we are able to work. Any advice is appreciated

    Also, we have one other child living in the home, who is currently ineligible, but I believe may be eligible soon after some more testing. My husband has 3 kids from a previous marriage, one of which we also claim on our taxes. My husbands sister is also living with us, she is 27 and receives SSDI, I am her rep payee. She does not pay rent, only contributes to food cost.

    Thanks for your time

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Samantha,

      Work income for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is either net self-employment, which usually does not allow reduction of income for a depreciation deduction, or gross wages. I am not aware of consideration being given for un-reimbursed work expenses for anyone other than a disabled person who is working. However, you can try to present your auto maintenance records to see if there is point of law I am missing.

      I calculate that with one eligible and one ineligible child and child support payments, in four paycheck months your family’s work income is over the limit for a federal SSI payment by about $150. (Some states pay an SSI state supplement that allows slightly higher income. I don’t know whether any allow your income.) In months that you have five paychecks, the excess would be about $850. (This assumes the child support is court ordered.) Having two disabled children, no ineligible children in the household, and continuing child support payments, each child would be eligible for about $400.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Anonymous

    My daughter is disabled , I have another child i make 2100 a month her check is 600.00 a month will they lower her month amount due per month. They have made me pay back in the past I am just worried on how we will make it if they cut her income .

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Anonymous,

      If you report your earnings by the tenth of every month for the previous month and your earnings are enough to pay at least $1.00 in SSI benefis, you should not have overpayments because your earnings will count two months later. Assuming your non-disabled child has no income, approximately $600 would be the correct benefit amount given your earnings.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Angie

    Hi.
    My children ages 11, 8 and 6 years old all recieve SSI for the max amount of 733 a month. My husband works part time earning 1300 a month. I’ll be starting a full time position over the next 3 weeks or so making 1920 a month. We live in KY and our rent is 1225 a month. I am also expecting a 4th child if that helps any. How much would my kids benefits go down by if any. Its hard to budget out anything.

    Thank you!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Angie,

      I estimate that your children’s SSI will go down by about $139 each. When your fourth child is born, the reduction will be reduced to about $36 each. As long as the children remain eligible for some payment, you income changes will affect benefits two months later.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Rita Cameron

    My grandson which I have custody of him just got medically approved for ssi my husband is his step grand–father and we both work will they us our income to determined weather he is eligible, and how much will he get.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Rita,

      If you have not adopted your grandson, your and your husband’s income will not affect your grandson’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. However, his SSI will likely be reduced to $488.67 for the past period because you have been providing him with free food and shelter. After the SSI starts if you use his benefits to pay his share of shelter and food, you can report the change and his SSI will increase to $733 two months later. His share is the total expenses divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Rita Cameron

        Thanks very much.

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Rita.

  • Sadie

    The court recently awarded me foster of my nephews who both receive survivor benefits from their father passing. One of my biological children is on ssi due to disability and low income. My question is this, will my nephews Ssi survivor Benifits count against me/my son as income and lower my sons ssi disability benefit?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Sadie,

      Being payee for your nephews survivor benefits will not affect your child’s SSI benefits because the nephews’ benefits are not your money. As long as the nephews do not pay more than their share of shelter and food expenses, their living with you will also not affect the SSI benefits. Each of their share is the total expenses divided by the number of people in the household.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Amy

        Iam getting married next year my son receives ssi I have 3 other children all 4 have the same father he pays 726 a month in child support my bf makes 4000 a month after taxes he brings in 3000 a month will my son still be eligible for ssi

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Amy,

          When you marry your disabled child will eligible for about $125 in months that your husband grosses $4,000. The estimate considers the child support for all children, although only two-thirds of your disabled child’s support counts.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Marie2010

    Oh I forgot one last question… he was approve August 12 when do he get his first ssi check… I got my representative interview over the phone in the morning but haven’t received my award letter .. Will the process be along time before I receive any type of payment

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Marie,

      If your son has not received his first benefit payment within a month, follow up to the local office.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Hi. I have 7 kids. I live with my husband and kids.3 kids have hearing loss. 2 of them receiving Ssi 733 each, 1 was denied,and we are waiting for a decision , we have scheduled hearing on September .my husband work, and his salary is about 2.800-3000 per month.about 2 months ago my hearth was broken, my 2 other boys was diagnosed with progressive muscular dystrophy .i stopped working .my question is: would my 2 boys get Ssi benefits if I apply ?with their diagnose they should get Ssi right away, but I, m not sure, due to my other kids who get Ssi ?shoukd I apply or I will just waste my time and get nothing?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Natali,

      Your children’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) medical eligibility is decided is decided independently without regard to the other child’s disability. If all your children are approved for benefits and the only family income $3,000 gross monthly salary, each child will be eligible for $733.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Dorothy

    My 5 year old recives 733 for SSI, my husband works and makes 2500-2700 gross monthly, I do not have income, we have two other children that receives no income that are 6 and 2 years old. It’s time for my son’s recertification I know he medically fits for ssi, my question is would his benefit amount change or stay the same and how much. He has seizures, Aspergers, NF, asthma, learning disabilities, development delays.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Dorothy,

      If the review is the annual redetermination, the review will be of the non-medical eligibility factors. If you have been reporting your husband’s variation in wages monthly and there has been no other income or changes in household composition, there should be no change in payment.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Dorothy

        My husband just started this job. Before his income was a lot lower. I didn’t know if this knew income would change his amount

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Dorothy,

          The amount of earnings you listed in your prior post would not affect the amount of your child’s SSI benefits.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Marie2010

    My husband make at least 1800 a month we have 2 children together stay with my mom and pay 500 in bills….we live in florida how much will he get monthly .. will he get his full benefits n back pay…. will we be cut off food stamps..

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Marie,

      With another minor child in the household, your husband’s earnings are not high enough to reduce your child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If your family is paying your mother the family’s share of shelter and food costs or shelter only if your family buys food separately, your child will receive the maximum SSI benefit. If not, the benefit will be reduced for free/subsidized shelter and/or food. The maximum reduction would take his benefit down to $488.64. Check with the food stamp office to find out how much, if any, the SSI benefit will reduce the food stamp grant.

      If your son currently has a reduction and he starts to pay his share of shelter and food expenses after his SSI starts, you can report that and he will receive an increase effective two months later.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Marie2010

        Hi Kay im Lil confuse he was approve August meaning he get benefits July to August do he get his monthly benefits for September …i was told yes now it’s no it starts in october

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Marie,

          If the ongoing monthly benefits don’t start until October, his back pay will include months through September.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Darla Glover

    Hi, I have a question. I am married. My husband and I have 6 children,ages 8,10,11,15,17,19.. the 15,17 and 19 yr old receive SSI @ 733.00 a month. My husband just got a job Aug 1, and gross pay is 600 week. He is self employed, but works for one man.. so he will be 1099 for the tax year. How will this effect the SSI of our children. I am unemployed.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Darla,

      Now that your nineteen-year-old is an adult, his parents income does not affect his benefits and does not be reported for his claim. Parental income is considered in determining your two disabled minor children’s benefits; however, with three other minor children in the household who do not have income of their own, your husband’s income of $600 a week will not reduce your children’s SSI benefits. Even though the income won’t change the benefits, it does need to be reported now.

      An aside, because your husband is not being treated as an employee, he will have to file self-employment tax returns and pay all his own income and Social Security taxes. If he needs assistance with this, I suggest that he contact a tax accountant or the IRS. When the taxes are filed, you need to submit a copy of the self-employment tax schedule to Social Security to finalize reporting of the self-employment for the prior year.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Lucy Colon

    Hey I have three kids that receive Ssi two of them get $733 a month and the third child gets $689 a month because he gets $90 dollars monthly of child support so I work part time I make 420 bi-weekly so total 840 monthly how will that effect my kids check

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Lucy,

      Your work earnings in the current amount will not affect your children’s SSI benefits even in months that you receive three paychecks. Nonetheless, you need to report the earnings.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Elizabeth Morton

        Hi Kay,
        I am really confused. I am a single mom and I only have 1 child who is autistic. I began receiving SSI for him a few months ago, and even though I had been out of work a year, I only receive $450 for him, we were living with my parents the time of the decision, however. Now we are living on our own and I am about to start a part time job making around $1000 gross a month. We have 1 car and rent. Not much at all, still receive tanf actually, will the SSI amount go up or down with this change? Also, received a letter from them before we moved stating that I made $95 dollars in February, have no clue what they’re talking about, and September amount is getting dropped to under $400, right now this will put me in poverty again, any advice? Thank you,
        Liz

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Elizabeth,

          If you did not have $95 income in February, go to Social Security and request an explanation. At the same time report the move and give an estimate for your new job. Estimate earnings for the first month in which you will receive a paycheck.

          If you are paying all your own and your child’s expenses in your new residence with your and the child’s income and your child has no income other than Supplemental Security income (SSI), the child’s SSI will go up to $733. There will be an increase because exclusions for earned income are larger than those for free or subsidized housing.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Hey i have a question my son gets $733 a month I don’t work and I just applied for my daughter if I get approved how much will I get for both my husband is in jail

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Cecilia,

      If your second child is approved and you still have no income, the children will receive $733 each.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Stacey Hale

    Hi, I have twins that qualify for ssi and both receive the max amount. I currently have an gross monthly income of $1300 and also have 4 other children, so 6 total. The father and I are currently not living together. If he were to move back in how would this affect my twins ssi?? His gross income is $3000 . I have a vehicle and he does as well. He still pays on his.

    • Me

      Are you no longer responding to questions?

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Stacey,

        Typically questions are answered within one to three days though occasionally it may be longer. Your question was answered on August 27.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Stacey,

      I estimate that each child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit would go down by about $120.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Anonymous

    I just applied for ssi for my daughter who has down syndrome and many other health issues. My husband and I have $2900 in savings plus his monthly income of approx $3000. We have 2 other children without disabilities. My questions are: will his monthly income count towards our resources even though it is spent as soon as it is received for bills; and in the months he receives 3 paychecks (gets paid every other week) and makes too much could my daughter become ineligible for ssi and more importantly medicaid? Thank you so much for any advice.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Anonymous,

      Income spent in the month it is received does not count as a resource. Money carried over to the following month counts as a resource in the following month. If you and your husband’s countable assets exceed $3,000, the excess will count toward your disabled child’s $2,000 limit. This means that if your child has no assets, you and your husband can have $5,000.

      Income of $3,000 will allow for an unreduced payment of $733. The maximum gross earnings for at least a $1 SSI payment and Medicaid is $4,525 gross per month so months with three paychecks could result in continuing eligibility. If Medicaid ineligibility occurred, eligibility would resume the following month when wages went down. Check to see if future work estimates can show the higher payment every six months to avoid overpayments and lag time in getting Medicaid eligiblity back in the system.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Karen

    Hello, we have twin boys that have both been recently diagnosed with Autism. We have very few assets/money in the bank and my husband has gross pay of about $3950.00 per month from his job (our only income of any kind). Would they qualify for SSI based on our income and if so do you know roughly how much it would be? We have no other people in the household, just the four of us and we live in Michigan. Thank you so much for your help!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Karen,

      If both of your children are approved, each will be eligible for about $333. If only one is approved, he will be eligible for about $34. Because each child’s claim will be reviewed separately, the first one approved will get the lower amount. Then if the second one is approved, the first child’s benefits will be recalculated retroactively to consider two eligible children.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Candis Robinson

        Hi just wondering what my son may get. Hes diagnosed with add and adhd and mood disorder. One other child not recieveing anything. I make about 2400 gross monthly. No child support or assets. If my daugther is deemed eligible what would each get.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Candis,

          If there is one parent in the household, your child will receive about $500 if he is medically approved.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Candis,

          I estimate that you son will be eligible for about $500 a month if he is medically approved.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Mat

    My soon to be wife and her daughter both get ssi “$733 x2” I work and make $2000 a month .How will it change if we were married?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Mat,

      If your $2,000 earnings are gross wages and if your countable assets are within the SSI resource limits, I calculate that your wife’s benefit will drop to about $150 and your stepdaughter’s will remain at $733.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Blanche

    My husband also pays child support for 2 children that do not live with us.. He pay 397$ a month..

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Blanche,

      Please see my prior responses. I estimated that your child would be eligible for the maximum $733 with one child in the household, so the fact that your husband pays child support for two other children will not increase your child’s SSI. You should, however, list the child support on your disabled child’s SSI financial forms.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jamilah

    My daughter has severe autism and she receives SSI in the amount of 714 a month. I’m a single parent and I got offered a part time job. Her father don’t live with me but he gives me 500 a month. Will her payment decrease if I work part time. Thanks

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jamilah,

      A certain amount of your income is excluded for your support and the support of other non-disabled children in the household. Whether or not your child’s SSI decreases when you start work will depend on how much you make and whether you have other children in the household. If you’d like to give me an estimated amount of earnings and let me know whether you have other minor children, I can better answer your question.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Blanche

    We pay 1100$ in bills a month not sure If that will matter or not..

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Blanche,

      Please see my prior response. The amount of the bills your pay does not affect your child’s SSI benefits unless some of those “bills” are rent paid to someone you are living with.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Sarah J

    I have a question. I receive SSI. My husband brings in earned income. Since my daughter turned 18 and was still attending high school, she still counted as a 367.00 deduction from my husband’s income. She is now enrolled in college classes, but will be living at my home, since she has no job currently. She will be attending college full time. Can she still qualify for the 367.00 deduction? I know on some programs, like medicaid in my state, she could go up until 22 as long as she is a student. I can’t get a straight answer from anyone else. Please help!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Sarah,

      My research indicates that your eighteen-year old can still be considered an ineligible child if she attends at least eight class hours a week at a college. You need to provide proof of her enrollment to Social Security. The reference is provision 3.a. of SI 01310.115 in Social Security’s POMS regulations and procedures.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • alana

    I am a single mom with a disabled 13 year old she gets 796.00 per month I also have a 14 year old with no income I just started a new job and i make 1920.00 a month for my work i get payed on the 5th and 20th of each month I also get payed to watch my grandson 148.50 per week will my child get cut off? i have no assets.

    Thank you

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Alana,

      With your new job, in months that you receive only four weekly pay checks for caring for your grandson, your daughter’s SSI will be eligible for about $498. In months that you get a fifth babysitting check, her SSI will be about $424.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerly,
      Kay

      • Blanche

        I need help.. my 4 year old son just got approved for ssi.. me and his father live with him his father works and makes 2040$ a month we also have another child that is not disabled I’m wondering how much he will get a month from ssi??

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Blanche,

          If your son’s father’s gross income is $2,040, with one ineligible child in the household I estimate that your son’s SSI will be $733.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Blanche

            Thank u so much!

            • Kay Derochie

              You are welcome, Blanche.

  • Jane

    Hello….my son was just approved for ssi in California and receives 733 a month..when we applied my husband who works cash was receiving 1000 a month .now he will start receiving about 2300 a month..we are a family of 5 with 2 ineligible children..my question is will this affect my sons benefits and how do i report my husbands wages if he is paid cash. ..thanks

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jane,

      If your husband is a self-employed contractor with $2,300 gross income, your child is eligible for $733. If he is an employee, I need to know your husband’s gross income before tax withholding to give a benefit estimate. If your husband is working as an independent contractor responsible for paying his own income tax and self-employment (Social Security tax) each calendar quarter, then his net income after work expenses is countable for SSI. If needed, consult with a tax accountant to learn about allowable work expenses and tax reporting and payment.

      As far as documentation for your son’s Supplemental Security Income claim goes, if the “employer” says your husband is not an employee but an independent contractor, you do not need proof from the person your husband is contracting for. Your husband will give an estimate of how much he will earn gross and net this year and of the first month he worked. The net profit estimated will be averaged and your child will be paid based on the estimated average. If during the year a big change in income occurs the estimate can be adjusted during the year. Then earnings and the calculation of SSI benefits for the past year is finalized from your husband’s self-employment tax return.

      If the employer says your husband is an employee, you can try submitting a statement from his employer listing how much he was paid per month beginning with the month you applied for your son and that the compensation was paid in cash. However, the employer may not want to do so; otherwise, he would be paying by check. If he writes the statement and says that your husband is an employee, then the cash your husband gets is net income after tax withholding and the employer’s statement must list the gross income paid to your husband before taxes were withheld.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Brandon

    Hello,

    My girlfriend and I live together and her 3 children live with us here. One of the three children has been diagnosed with cancer and due to needing 24 hour care she will now have to be staying at home full time and will no longer be working to take care of him.

    She currently receives $300 per month in food stamps and the father is supposed to be paying $300 per month in child support but hasn’t made a payment in over 2 years.

    She used to make around $1100 per month and give me $800 per month towards bills but that will no longer be available because she will be staying at home to take care of the sick child, take him to chemo, tests, etc and be prepared for emergencies at home for at least the next year.

    My question’s are:

    1. since I will be providing 100% of the income for all 4 of them now, will her son still be eligible for SSI off of her income?

    2. How will they determine the household income since we are not married but I will be providing the income for the entire household?

    3. Will the food stamps effect the SSI?

    4. In your opinion what would be the best approach to get approved for the SSI if it is possible.

    5. Will the $300 per month for child support that is never paid effect the SSI?

    PS. I own:
    1. my home (which is updside down in value)
    2. Three cars (2 are valued less than 1k the other $3,500
    3. I have a 401k with at least 6k
    4. My bank accounts have an average between 1-2k after bills
    5. She has a 401k with around $500 in it
    6. I work in sales so my hourly is $11.00 per hour at 40 hours per week but my commision checks vary from 0-5k and average about 2k.

    Thank you so much for your time

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Brandon,

      I will answer your questions in a different order than you asked them.

      1. Because you are not married to the disabled child’s mother, your income and assets do not affect the child’s eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

      2. SSI financial eligibility is calculated month by month, so benefit amounts can change.

      3. Food stamps do not affect SSI. If your girlfriend has not already done so, she should report her cease work to see if her food stamp grant will increase.

      3. Because you are paying all the shelter expenses, the child’s share (one-fifth) of the mortgage, property tax, property insurance (if required by the lender), power, heat, garbage, water, and sewer will count as the child’s in-kind (non-cash) income up to a maximum of $264.33. If the child’s share is less than that only the exact share will count. All but $20 of the countable in-kind income will reduce the SSI from the maximum benefit. You need to write up a statement that you are paying the shelter costs and that your girlfriend and her children buy their own food. Submit the statement and documents proving the shelter expenses with the SSI application.

      4. Anything else you pay for directly (health insurance premiums, car insurance, clothing, etc.) for the family will not affect SSI if it is paid directly. If you give your girlfriend money for her to pay for things, that will be income to her. She can have some income of her own before it effects the SSI claim, but it does have to be reported.

      3. The child support order will not affect the SSI; only support actually paid will count to reduce the SSI.

      4. I suggest that your girlfriend check with her local state or country social services office to find out if her state pays a wage or stipend to individuals taking care of a severely disabled relative. The program, where it exists, is called In-Home Support Services (IHSS). If the IHSS payment is made to her, not the child, with two other children in the household, none or only part of it would affect the child’s SSI.

      5. In order not to lose benefits, start the SSI application this month by calling 1-800-772-1213 and requesting an appointment to file the SSI application. I suggest that your girlfriend let her child’s oncologist know she is applying for disability benefits for the child. Get copies of the test reports that show the diagnosis and, if possible, a statement from the physician that describes the child’s symptoms, limitations, treatment, the fact that the child needs 24-hour care, and if known the prognosis. (For SSI approval, the disability has to be expected to last twelve months or end in death.) Do not delay the claim for the medical records or the doctor’s statement. You can submit them as soon as you get them. On the application, list all health-care providers and facilities. (Given the need for 24-hour care, I assume the child is not attending school. If a tutor is coming in, the tutor could make a statement if the child’s illness is affecting school performance even from home.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • daniel

    hi ,i need help ,I’m a single father in california my income is 2966, rent 1230 ,my child was diagnosed with autism ,no other children ,can i still qualify for ssi?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Daniel,

      If your $2,966 income is gross earned income, your child may be eligible for about $26 SSI and Medicaid.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Ashley

    I am legally separated and have 3 children m. One receives Ssi. I was receiving 659 but started a new job. My gross icome monthly is about 1580. Will my daughter still get benefits if so about how much?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ashley,

      If your children have no income, your disabled daughter will be eligible for $733 in SSI payments. You need to report your new job by the tenth of the month after you receive your first paycheck.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Mary

      Hi I was thinking about apply for ssi for my son he has ADD/speech impairment and behind in his learning skills but I don’t know if my earning is too much. I live with my boyfriend and also have 2 other kids that isn’t disable so total of 5 people in household my boyfriend isn’t the father of my son the one with disability but 1 of the child is with him I don’t get any support or income for my other 2 kids from pervious relationship I gross about $4384 a month and so as my boyfriend I was just wondering would they use his gross too event tho we’re ot married annd he’s not the father of my son. He pays the mortgage and I pay all the ulitles and food.

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Mary,

        Your boyfriend’s income and assets will not be considered in determining your child’s eligibility for SSI; however, the maximum earned (work) income one parent with two ineligible children can have is $3,791 gross wages or net self-employment.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  • Chris

    Our oldest son (5 years old) was approved for SSI benefits a year ago. Our second child is being evaluated for Autism next week and there is a real possibility he will indeed be diagnosed. This is where it gets confusing. My gross income per month is $3944 per month. Because our youngest is not officially diagnosed yet, he has been considered an “ineligible” child and one of the reasons my income is below the limit and got us a small SSI amount for our oldest son. If our youngest becomes diagnosed will we be denied SSI for both kids because we no longer have an “ineligible” child in the house and our income is above the $3791 limit? Or will both kids qualify?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Chris,

      I infer that you have two parents in the household. If this is the case, both your children will be eligible. Your income that available (deemable) for the support of your disabled children will be divided in half and half charged to each. I estimate that each child will be eligible for about about $333 ongoing. The older child’s benefits will be recalculated for all months in the past that the younger child was eligible. The older one’s overpayment if any will be withheld from the younger child’s back pay because they are part of the same family unit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Chris

        Thanks so much for your expertise and taking the time to respond! Yes, we do have two parents in the household and just our two kids. We are currently receiving around $106 per month for our oldest child. When you said each child will be eligible for about $333 ongoing do you mean they would share that amount or do you mean the total amount for both would be roughly $666? Again, thanks and I really appreciate your help!

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Chris,

          Each child will receive about $333 for a total of $666 if both are found to be disabled.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • nicole

    I AM A SEPERATED MOM OF 2 CHILDREN-1 DETERMINED DISABLED AND 1 NOT
    I WORK NOW PARTTIME AND GROSS APPROX $2700 A MONTH AND LIVE IN MY OWN HOME AND HAVE 1 CAR IN NORTH CAROLINA

    I RECEIVE CHILD SUPPORT FOR BOTH CHILDREN IN THE AMOUNT OF $316 A WEEK

    WILL MY DISABLED CHILD QUALIFY FOR BENEFITS?

    THANK YOU

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Nicole,

      Your work earnings combined with the child support make your disabled child ineligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Kerrie Holiday

    I am a single mother of an autistic thirteen year old. My income is 1,600 bi weekly and get 400 in child support, is my income too high to get SSI for my son? I also have my 22 year old daughter living with me- she is a student and not working.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kerrie,

      Your income is about $100 too high for your child to receive SSI without considering his child support. With the child support, his income is about $500 to much for him to qualify. No allowance is given for the support of your adult daughter.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Alicia

    I have two kids that are receiving SSI Payments of $733.00 a month. They have been receiving this amount for, four years now. I am a single mother taking care of four children. Their father is ordered to pay Child Support, but, he barely pays it. If he does pay, he pays only $20.00 a week for his four children. There was no Child Support payment given since, June 13, 2016. That payment was only, $20.00. I am required to give this information to Social Security, by the fifth of every month. Our local Family Court, prints me a form of the Child Support Payment for the previous month. I am unemployed at the moment. I have applied for SSI twice, and I was denied. I have an Herniated Disc in my lower back on the right side. I am planning to start working soon, and my income estimate is $1,000 a week. At the end of the year, I am required to fill out a 1099 form, being that, I will be considered an Independent Contractor. I don’t own anything at all. I don’t own a house, car, land, boat…. My children’s father and I are separated, and we don’t own anything together at all. We have no assets or amenities of any kind together. Can you please tell me if, my income of $1,000 a week, may, affect my two children’s SSI Payments, a month. My son has an Intellectual Disability, and my daughter has, Autism, ADHD, and an Intellectual Disability. My son is fourteen years old, and my daughter is, eight years of age.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Alicia,

      I calculate that your children’s SSI will each go down to about $300 in months that you receive four weekly paychecks or two bi-weekly paychecks. In months that you get an extra weekly or biweekly paycheck, they will not be eligible. The preceding estimate is based on $1,000 a week income from self-employment being both your gross income and your net income with no business expenses. If you have business expenses that you can claim on your tax return, the estimate of benefits payable would be higher because SSI uses net self-employment income. I recommend that you consult with a tax accountant to find out what, if any, business expenses you can claim and what taxes you will be responsible for.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Courtney Myers

    Hello, I hope you can give me some info. I am a bit confused on how to do the calculations lol.
    I just got married. There is 5 of us. Me, my husband, 3 kids all under 18. One of them receives ssi.
    We make a combined gross of about 4,000 a month. Sometimes he makes less depending on hours.
    4000-734(for the non-disabled children) = 3266-85 = 3181
    3181 / 2 = 1590.5-1100 (for a couple) = 490.5
    My child get $796 a month right now. So does the calculations mean $490.50 will come out of my sons $796?

    Thank you

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Courtney,

      Your analysis of deemed income is correct. If your child’s $796 is unreduced federal SSI and unreduced state SSI supplement, then yes, your child’s SSI be reduced to $30a5.50 ($796 – $490.50) in months that your combined income hits $4,000. You need to report your marriage and changed income and any additional assets right away.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • ALH38

    Hi Kay,

    I am curious to know if it is hard for children under 14 to get SSI in Newport News Virginia? I would also like to know the rules for receiving benefits as well? Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear AlH38,

      The rules for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits are the same in all states. Family income and assets must fall below the SSI limits and the child must be disabled as defined by law. I suggest that you read the articles under the SSI tab at the top of this webpage to get a general orientation to SSI. One article describes the criteria used for deciding whether a child is disabled. You can call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 to request an application appointment.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Casey

    Hi there. My son was approved medically for ssi but I think we are going to be denied financially. We are hh of 4. Married with two mutual children. One is disabled the other is not. 505 gross weekly for husband.1300 bi weekly for mom. I pay 260 bi weekly for private health insurance and other expenses such as car payments. No assets. We live in Maine. Any thoughts if he will qualify for any payments. Even a dollar would help because he would get free medicaid and its much needed

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Casey,

      Your family income is about $462 above the limit for a family of four. You might look into Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to find out whether your child would qualify for less expensive insurance. Your income will be taken into consideration and possibly your access to other insurance for the children.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • JD

    My son is considered disabled and has received SSI before but his case was closed when I started receiving small amounts of child support a few years ago. I’ve been looking online to see if he might financial qualify and It’s so complicated. I don’t want to go through applying if he doesn’t qualify, please let me know what you think. I’m a single parent, one child, I receive SSDI 1039 he gets 461 a month from my SSDI and and he gets 120-180 in child support a month (at the moment) We live in NH. Please let me know if you think he qualifies and his possible payment amount.
    Thanks a bunch:)

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear JD,

      Your Social Security and your son’s Social Security are above the Supplemental Security Income income limits without considering the child support. Three months before your son turns eighteen, apply for him to continue to receive Social Security as a disabled adult child receiving childhood disability benefits (CDB). If he is either no longer receiving child support and/or is paying for his shelter and food costs, he may be eligible for SSI at that time.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Tomia

    Hi Kay,

    I recently began a job making 20$ per hour working 40 hours per week, no unearned income, and no other adult living in the home. My minor daughter receives the maximum SSI benefit of 733$ with no other income. I have an ineligible minor child within the home with no income. How much will her SSI benefit be reduced as a result of the new job?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tomia,

      In months that you receive four weekly or two bi-weekly paychecks, your child will be eligible for approximately $102 a month. In months that you receive five weekly or three bi-weekly paychecks, your child will be ineligible. This assumes the family has countable resources (assets) below the allowable limit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • april buckley

    My daughter is disabled and receives benefits.

    My employer pays for my health insurance and other benefits. They add it to my pay and then deduct it before taxes are added. Can this be deemed as part of my income or should it be excluded?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear April,

      Your question was answered under the article where you asked the question. Here is what I responded:

      I do not know the answer to your question for sure. If the employer did not show the benefit cost on your paycheck, the purchase of benefits for you definitely would not be income for SSI purposes. I think that you can argue that the addition and subtraction of the benefits net out to zero so zero should be counted for them.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • My minor son received ssi benefits because his father (who does not live with us) is disabled. During the benefit period in 2015 (Jan – Aug) My son worked, but did not exceed the $15k limit in this time period. BUT did exceed $15K in 2015. Does SSI look at the entire year even though he did not receive benefits Sept – Dec?

    thank you

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Melissa,

      The benefit you describe are Social Security dependent benefits, not SSI (Supplemental Security Income) benefits. If he did not receive benefits September through December because he had reached the age limit for dependent benefits, only the earnings through August we be considered and likely prorated to $1,310 per month January through August; that is limited to $10,480 for those eight months.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Crystal

    Hi, what are the income limits for a family of 5 with a child receiving ssi benefits?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Crystal,

      The income limits depend on whether the income is earned (work earnings) or unearned, the number of parents and minor children in the household, and whether the ineligible (non-disabled) children have income. If you would like to provide more information, I’ll try to respond more specifically.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jen

    Hi,
    My 5 1/2 year old son was diagnosed with autism when he was 2 1/2. We are both self-employed at our company. We have 3 children all under 5 1/2 (1 with autism). I’m a bit confused how self-employment is calculated. Could you explain it to me? Is it different than if we were not self employed?

    We both make over the $4000/month limit I believe there is for a 2 parent household. We have 2 cars (his is older and he still makes payments on and mine is a lease). Would retirement accounts (401k etc) be considered? We have no other income.

    Thank you

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jen,

      How your self-employment earnings are counted depends on what kind of a company your have (partnership, C-Corp, S-Corp, sole proprietor and one of you is an employee) and how your income is reported to the IRS. To get this evaluated, you would have to file a claim. You do not say how much over $4,000 you earn. The limit for a family with two ineligible children with no income is $4,525 gross per month.

      If you can access the 401k even with tax penalty for withdrawal, the 401k is an asset and counts toward the limit. I don’t know all the legalities of leasing, but my guess is that you do not own the leased car because you can turn it back at the end of the lease period. If you don’t own it, it will not be a resource.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Nydia

    Hello Kay
    I have a question. I’m a single.mother of a 13 year old girl and a 6 year old boy. My son receives 523.00 from SSI and 300 from Child support. My older one doesn’t get anything. Since my son was born I stopped working to care for him, but my living situation is difficult. I have apply for ssi in April for my self and I’m waiting for an answer. I’m currently living in a room in my cousins house with my 2 kids and he has asked me to live because he needs the room. In this case I have decided to find a job to get a place to live for me and my children. I understand once I start working I will be denied my ssi but I have no other choice. I’m thinking applying for a job that I will be making 2,240 a month before taxes. I dont have any more assests or anything else. I will like to know if my son will loose his ssi? Thanks in advance for your help.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Nydia,

      I estimate that your child’s SSI will be reduced by about $150 when you start work.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Charity

    Hi, can you help me? I’m going to apply for disability for my two kids. My husband makes 950 gross every week. We have one vehicle and one other he borrows from his brother but doesn’t own. Im trying to get a job. My son has been diagnosed since he was 3 and my daughter since she was 8. They are 11 and 13 now. How much would they get a mont? Also my husband pays 700 in child support for 13 years now for 2 other kids. One has turned 19 and the other will be 18 soon. We count the oldest on our taxes. They dont live with us. Will they affect anything? And would I be able to get any back money from when my children were little?
    Thank you for your time.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Charity,

      Based on the information you provided, if both your children are approved, they will be financially eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). The amount they are eligible for will vary depending on how many paychecks your husband receives a month. (If he is paid weekly, he will get a fifth paycheck every three months; paid biweekly, a third check every six months.) Child support payments for minor children are considered when calculating SSI payment amounts for minor children and reduce the amount of parental income deemed (considered) available for support of the disabled children. However, unless the nineteen-year-old is disabled, I don’t think that the $350 being paid for the nineteen-year old will be considered because the child is no longer a dependent minor. The same will be true when the other child turns eighteen. Who claims the child as a dependent on their taxes does not affect SSI. SSI is not retroactive, so benefits will begin the month after the month of application unless you file on the first of the month in which case benefits begin the month of application.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Charity

        Thank you for your consideration of my case. My husband makes 950 per week. How much do you think we would get?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Charity,

          Please see my reply of July 8.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Melissa

    I have 3 kids 2 of which are on SSI. My oldest gets $733 in SSI and $50 a month in child support. My middle child gets $485 in SSI, $210 in SSI (from her biological father being on disability.) and $86 a month in child support. My youngest child get $57 a week in child support as her only income. I have no income myself. I just got married last month and my husband makes about $520 a week before taxes and gets paid biweekly. He also pays about $300 as month in child support to his ex wife. We pay $500 in rent, about $400 for electric and gas, $300 in truck payment (we have 2 vehicles but mine is paid for), $160 phone bills, $200 a month in Auto insurance.

    My question is, how much will my husband’s income affect my children’s SSI?

    Also, my husband has expressed interest in adopting my children. How will this affect their SSI and SSA?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Melissa,

      You appear to live in a state with an SSI state supplement because the income totals you give for your disabled children are above the allowable amount for just federal SSI. I estimate that in months that your husband is paid twice, the children’s SSI will not change. In months that he receives three checks the countable earnings will cause a reduction of about $130 in each child’s SSI two months later. Adoption will not affect the SSI payment calculation. Adoption will affect the Social Security dependent benefits being paid on the children’s biological father.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Melissa

        Thank you so very much!

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Melissa.

  • Teresa

    My husband and I have permanent custody of his grandson since he was 4 1/2 months old he is now 3 his parents are not in the picture we recently sign him up for ssi and they said he was approved medically wait to do the allowance my question is will they use our income as allowance ? Thanks in advance

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Teresa,

      Grandparents’ income is not considered in determining SSI payment amount for a minor child. What will affect his payment is that you are providing free food and housing, which is in-kind (non-cash) income. For him to receive full benefits, he would have to pay his share of shelter. (He eats different food so food could be purchased separately for him with his money.)

      Share is the total shelter costs divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

      Your grandson will likely have some back pay coming; and if it is not so much that it has to be deposited to a restricted-use Dedicated account, you could use part of his back pay together with his monthly benefits to have him pay his share of shelter and his own food. Two months after he pays his full share and you use his money for his separate food, his SSI will be increased.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Kimberly

    Hi Kay! First thanks so much for this article. It has helped me in my journey of understanding disability. We are a family of 4 in which my husband is the only one working. He earns on average about 1440 every 2 weeks in gross pay. We have a son who has ASD. Today when applying I was told that we barely qualify and that we will get the lowest amount possible BUT will be receiving medicaid for my son which is #1 the biggest blessing! Here’s the thing, I have been looking on the social security website and they provide a chart with 2 amounts for a family like ours. ! ineligible child in the house with either 1 parent in the household where the cut off is $3,424, and 2 parents in the household $4,158. Now the only way I can see us coming in just below the cutoff would be if we were counted as a 1 parent family. Which by any normal definition we are a 2 parent family. When I do the math as a 2 parent family there is over a $1,000 difference on the cutoff. Am I understanding this wrong or is there a chance that a mistake has been made? Can you please help me understand how our case worker came to this conclusion?

    • Kimberly

      that should say * 1 ineligible child in the household.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kimberly,

      With two parents and one ineligible child in the household, in the two months a year that your husband has three paychecks your child would be financially ineligible if the average was $1,400 per pay period because the total would be $4,200 for the month. If the average is actually a little less than $1,400 each, your child would be eligible for a very minimum amount in those months. In months that your husband receives only two paychecks, your child would be eligible for about $680.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • laura

    Hi, pls help

    We are 2 parents( my and my husband) and we have only one child (2 yrs ) and that one child is diagnosed with autism. Only I work and earn around $3400 a month gross income. My husband doesn’t work, has no income and stays home looking after our child.
    Can my child qualify for SSI and how much monthly? We are in Illinois.

    How much is too much in a bank statement that they need to see? We only have several thousands in our bank and we have only one car and it is a 2007 Camry.
    Thank you

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Laura,

      Your family income is within the SSI limits. The resource (asset) limit is $2,000 for your disabled child and $3,000 for you and your husband. The car does not count. If you and your husband have more than $3,000, the excess counts toward your child’s $2,000 limit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • laura

        Please help explain” The resource (asset) limit is $2,000 for your disabled child and $3,000 for you and your husband. The car does not count. If you and your husband have more than $3,000, the excess counts toward your child’s $2,000 limit.”?

        We have $8K in bank account. Is that too high for SSI approval for our austistic toddler?
        Thanks

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Laura,

          Yes, you and your husband have $3,000 more in assets than the SSI resource limit because $5,000 of your savings is deemed (considered) your child’s. The child’s limit is $2,000. The excess savings of $3,000 are considered available for the support of your disabled child and, therefore, the child does not need support from the government at this time. assistance

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Amanda

    Does VA Disability Compensation count as unearned income? Does a VA Pension count as unearned income? The literature that I have been reading has been referring to the two interchangeably, and I am not quite clear which one is “countable” and which one is not.

    Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Amanda,

      VA compensation is a benefit paid for military service-connected disability. VA pension is financial needs-based program that pays a disability or old-age benefit to certain veterans who have income and assets below a certain level. Veterans benefits are unearned income for calculating SSI benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Felicia

    Hi Kay,

    My son is 2 1/2 he was diagnosed with Autisim last week. I filed for SSI Monday.
    We are a household of 6 (myself, husband, 4 children with 1 being the disabled child) only one income in household. $3900 per month gross & after taxes roughly $2600. We have a house payment of $728 & car payment of $394 we have 2 cars 1 being paid for older model the other one with the payment. We pay our child support for $215 & receive child support for $245. No other assets, no foodstamps. What would we get per month if approved?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Felicia,

      Assuming that your countable assets including the car with the lower equity value and any retirement accounts are below the resource limit of $3,000 for two parents and $2,000 for the disabled child and assuming that none of the $245 child support is for the disabled child, I estimate the SSI benefit to be about $390.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Kristina

    Dear Kay,

    Hello! My 6 year old daughter was diagnosed with a terminal neurodegenerative condition called metachromatic leukodystrophy in Aug 2015. She underwent a bone marrow transplant on 10/16/15 to try to slow down its progression, and was in the hospital in a different state for 6 months. There is no cure.

    Our social worker advised us to apply for SSI for my daughter. I have been a stay at home mom to my 2 daughters (6 and 2) for 3 years, and my husband is our only source of income. The only government help we have is state insurance (Maryland). My husbands income monthly is roughly $3300.
    I have our first phone interview tomorrow morning. I am very unfamiliar with all of this, as my child was completely healthy until last August. This is all so new to me. Does it look like my daughter will be approved for benefits? I appreciate any help you are willing to offer my family and I! Thank you in advance!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kristina,

      Your child appears to be medically eligible for SSI and she is financially eligible for SSI if your countable resources (assets) are not above the limit. As parents, you and your husband can have $3,000 in countable assets. This includes IRA and 401k accounts. The excess counts towards your child’s $2,000 asset limit. A home you live in ans one vehicle do not count. the equity value of the least valuable second vehicle counts unless you can make a case for your husband not being able to get to work and you not being able to take your daughter to the doctor with a second vehicle. In that case, the second might be excluded as income producing property. If you are unsure about your financial eligibility, keep the appointment and get a formal determination.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jennifer

    Hi Kay,

    My 3 year old son just got diagnosed with autism. His father and I are married, with me being the only one working. I have figured out that with my earned and deemed income he does qualify. My question to you is this. How far back does SSI go back with my income? How many months of pay do they use in determining how much he will get and how often do they re-evalute? Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jennifer,

      SSI payment amounts are calculated monthly. As long as your family income is below the limits, your income in one month affects payment amount two months later. You can request telephone reporting of earnings, which should be reported by the tenth of the month following receipt of pay.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Nicole

      My 10 year old daughter just got approved for Social Security disability. I am a single mom and have to kids one disable and one non disable. My income is 2,622 a month and i get child support for the disable daughter 300. and child support for the non disable daughter 200. Do my daughter qualify to to receive a disability check from Social Security???

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Nicole,

        I estimate that your child will be eligible for about $47 Supplemental Security Income (SSI)–not Social Security–benefits.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Jessica Harris

      Ok so I have a micro premier born at 23 weeks 5 days gestation she is currently reviewing low birth weight ssi at 30 a month because she is still in the hospital. Once she comes home how will it affect sail?. I’m on disability. Her dad grosses about 1200 every two weeks. We also have 3 other daughters that live with us and his son who’s here every other weekend.

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Jessica,

        I think you may have a typographical error with the word “sail,” so I am not sure what you mean. If you have not already filed an application for your youngest child, you can do so while the child is still in the hospital. Benefits will be minimal while she is hospitalized. When she comes home, based on what you told me, she should be eligible for the maximum Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Her SSI will not affect yours.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  • Ms. K

    Hello Kay,
    I have a question, my daughter is twelve and is receiving SSI as she was born with a genetic disorder. I also have another typical child under 18 yrs of age.. My only income is IHSS (in home supportive services) that I receive a maximum of $2700 a month. We live in CA. My boyfriend (not my children’s father) proposed marriage. He also receives SSI for disability for an accident he was in in 2004. My first question is, will my daughters SSI be affected by my boyfriends income if we get married? And, will my boyfriends income be affected by my income of $2700 a month? I also am aware that my boyfriend could claim my two children under his benefits? How will that affect my daughters SSI? I’m trying to figure out what would be financially beneficial for our family if we got married. Although I am ecstatic to marry him, it might cause a financial burden on us if we do. It is already hard enough to live on supplemental income.
    I am hoping you can help me with this.

    • Ms. K

      I wanted to add that the IHSS income I receive as my daughters caregiver.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ms. K.,

      Your IHSS income is excluded from counting against your daughter’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) because you are receiving it for her care. It will not be excluded in determining SSI eligibility for your husband and will reduce his SSI to about $109. If he is, however, receiving Social Security Disability (SSD) based on his own earnings record, your income will not affect his benefits. The children wculd become eligible for children’s benefits on his account after you have been married one year if he is getting SSD, not SSI, and if he was providing more than 50% of their support when he became disabled or at certain other points in time related to his initial application for disability benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Curious Friend

    Dear Kay,

    In Alabama can multiple children (3 or 4) with diagnosis receive benefits in a single parent home with no income other than $350 child support. The mother is newly divorced and the dad is incarcerated with no expectations of supplying help for the children. The mother is also very ill with two medical illnesses. Please advise.

    Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Curious Friend,

      Based on the family income you list, if the children and mother are all disabled, they could all receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI). It takes a while to process disability claims, so it might be a good idea for the family to contact the state or county social services office to find out whether the child support can be supplemented by Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) payments while the SSI claims are pending.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Curious Friend

        Thank you very much.

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome.

  • Kim

    My six year old son is currently receiving SSI in the amount of 733 per month. My husband’s income is going to go up in July. He is self employed and his income will go from $2250 per month to $4000 per month. Our family consists of both parents and two children one disabled and one is not. Will my son lose his benefits?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kim,

      Usually SSI benefits calculations count monthly self-employment as one-twelve of the total year. If that is done in your son’s case, less than $4,000 would be counted. If $4,000 is counted, your child will still be eligible for benefits, just a lesser amount. You can use the formula in the sample calculation in the article where you posted to work up an estimate. Be sure to report the increase in income and provide a new annual self-employment estimate for 2016.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Danielle

    I have a 3 yr old diagnosed with autism, live with his father (not married) and we both work. If both our income is over the monthly would he still be eligible? I don’t receive child support.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Danielle,

      The income of both your child’s parents counts in determining his SSI eligibility even though you are not married because he lives with both parents and the deeming of income is from parent to child. So, if combined parental income is over the limit, your child will not be eligible. You can view an income chart at http://www.socials.gov/ssi/text-child-ussi.htm.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • S Scarlett

    Why was my comment deleted !! I need answers

    • Kay Derochie

      Scarlett, your answer is where you posted your question, under the article “I Can’t Live on the Social Security I Am Getting. Is There a Way I Can Get More Money?” under the “After Approval” tab at the top of this web page.

      • S Scarlett

        Ok thanks

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome.

  • Dee

    Thank you. Where can I find income guidelines? Also, do we need to submit pay check stub every month? I also called ssi and was told that settlement counts as income? Is there a way to appeal it? As this was for a work injury and has nothing to do with our child!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Dee,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a needs-based public assistance program intended to supplemental a family’s income the family includes a disabled person or a person over sixty-five but only if income and assets are below a certain level. Accordingly, parental income does have to do with your child’s eligibility for SSI, and the workers comp is countable income in the month received.

      Any of the settlement that you still have on the first of the following month will count toward the resource (asset limit). Your child will become eligible for benefits again when you have used enough of the settlement repaying the SSI overpayment and supporting your disabled child and your family so that you have spent down to the limits, which are $3,000 for two parents and $2,000 for your disabled child. Any amount above $3,000 is counted toward the child’s resource limit. If your child becomes financially eligible again within twelve months, no new application is needed.

      You can view monthly income limits for at least $1 of SSI being payable at http://www.socials.gov/ssi/text-child-ussi.htm; however, the chart does not cover situations with a mix of earned and unearned income. You can use the formula in the example calculation in the article above to estimate benefits. Maximum income limits vary depending on number of parents in the household, the number of non-disabled minor children in the household, and whether the income is earned (work income) or unearned (non-work income including workers comp).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Kristen

    Hi, my 7 year old receives SSI. She usually gets 515-550 a month depending on how much child support was received. I get about 850 a month in child support total for 3 children. All are young and there is no other income in the house. I own my vehicle and it is older. No other assets. I start working tomorrow and I was wondering how it will effect the SSI. I’m going to be making about 1020 gross a month. I’m prepared for child support payments to be lowered as well. Also, when do I report the new job? Do I wait until I have my first pay stub so I can send it in?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kristen,

      Your earnings will be low enough that none of your work income will be deemed to (considered available for) your children. Social Security needs to receive a report of your earnings at least by the tenth of the month following the month in which you receive your paychecks.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Lilly

    My 2 year old was just approved for disability under her medical condition my husband earns $2,720/month and I am self employed so my income varies from $900-$1500/month our rent is $1250/month and we have 2 children total (one disabled one not). we have no other resources or assets aside from the car we e/use to get to and from work which are older cars a 1999 and a 2006. Are we above income limits? thanks

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Lilly,

      Based on monthly calculations, your child would be within the income limits in months you made $900 and a bit over in months that you made $1500. However, usually self-employment is averaged over a year because business expenses don’t always occur in the same months as income comes in. Typically, you would give an estimate for the whole year and adjust the estimate mid-year if circumstances change substantially. Once a year when you submit your self-employment tax returns, your child’s benefits are recalculated for the past year based on your actual net profit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Lilly

        thank you. what would be the estimated max I can make through self employment to keep her receiving her benefits?? and about how much will she be entitled to (estimate)? thank you!!!!!

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Lilly,

          You can view the income limit chart for a child’s financial eligibility at http://www.socials.gov/ssi/text-child-ussi.htm. The amounts shown allow payment of at least $1, which usually also provides eligibility for Medicaid.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

      • Lilly

        Assuming my deductions are $175-$200 a month.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Lilly,

          Please see my response of a few minutes ago.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Rai

    Im a single mother of 2 children my youngest recieves 733 a months ssi i recently started working making 500 every 2 weeks will this effect his 733

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Rai,

      Assuming your non-disabled child has no income and the $500 is gross wages, your earnings will not affect your disabled child’s SSI; however, you do need to report that you started work as soon as you get a paycheck to show what your earnings are.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Rai

        My other child has no income his father is deceased im the only source of income
        I only starting getting ssi for my baby a year ago and i actually forgot i had to report its been almost 2 months i plan on calling first thing tuesday morning thank you

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Rai.

  • Stacey

    I recently gave birth to a precious baby girl with Down syndrome and I have 13 yr old son living at home with me as well. My income is around 2000$ gross a month, the father of the baby pays the daycare for me to work but I don’t get child support. How much will she qualify for? I have lost days of work to take her to her many doctors appointments. I have a mortgage and a car payment. So i really don’t have any assets per say that are paid for.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Stacey,

      Your work earnings of $2,000 will not reduce your child’s SSI benefit as long as you have your other minor child in the household and he does not have unearned income or earned income above the exclusion amounts. As long as the father of the baby pays the childcare directly to the provider and does not give you the money to pay it, his financial help will not affect benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • msvicki

    I currently am going back to work and will make approx. 1500$ a month and i also receive 280$ a month in child support.. I already get 566.34 a month in ssi for my son, will my 1500$ count against his pay when I have 3 other dependents?

    • msvicki

      Also I do not receive child support for my other 3 children.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ms. Vicki,

      Your earnings will not be high enough to affect your child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit, but you do need to report the return to work and continue to report your earnings monthly.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • David

    Hello, i am disabled and receive SSDI benefits of$1335 a month. I applied for spouse and child benefits for my wife and step child. My wife has no income (disabled, awaiting SSDI hearing) and my step child receives $392.53 ($134.47 withheld for health insurance) in child support. We have all lived in the same household as a family for 5 years, but have only been married for a little over a year. SSI made us wait the full year before we could even apply and even after that we have been denied any spouse or child benefits. I am going to appeal this denial, but I have to file documents as to why. All of my benefits go to the support of the 3 of us, yet we’re told that I don’t provide half of my step daughter’s expenses. They also deny my wife anything across the board. I could please use some help or advice with any of this. Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear David,

      For a stepchild to receive benefits the child must have been financially dependent on your for more than 50% of his support for a year before your disability onset date as established by Social Security or a year before your entitlement to benefits (the first month FOR which benefits were paid). If you think the dependency requirement was met, you can appeal.

      Your wife can receive benefits at age sixty-two. To be eligible at a younger age, she must have a child under age sixteen in her care who is eligible on your earnings record.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Kim

    My 6 year old son was just approved for SSI. We are a family mom, dad and two kids. One is disabled and the other is waiting approval. We have two older vehicles. My husband works and is self employed. He grosses 2200 per month. What will his monthly payment be?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kim,

      With two parents and one ineligible child,your child would be eligible for $733. This assumes that family assets are below the limit. The car with the lower equity value (retail value less amount owed)counts toward the parents’ $3,000 limit. If you parents have resources above $3,000, the excess will count toward your disabled child’s $2,000 limit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Mary

    My son was recent found to have lung issues and as asthmatic. My gross income is 3019 which is below the limit but I also receive child support 260 monthly. Would this make him over the limit

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Mary,

      If you have no other children and only one parent and no stepparent in the household, yes, your son’s child support combined with the portion of your income that is deemed to your child (considered available for his support) will put him over the income limit. If you need medical insurance for him, you might look into the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). More information is available at http://www.healthcare.gov.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • laketta Staten

    I grossed $2,538 last month will my children’s Ssi be decreased?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Laketta,

      I need more information to respond. Do you have other minor children in the household? If so, do they have income? Do you have a husband in the household or is the child father in the household? How much is your disabled child receiving now? Does that child have income?

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Janie Mallow

    Family: Husband, self (wife), 2 children with autism and other medical issues.
    Income: Husband grosses 4750 per month.
    I am currently working, but our household is moving for better educational/medical services for children, so I am considering SAHM due to high volume medical appts.
    Rent 1175 per month.
    Car payments 325 and 234 per month.
    Children eligible for ssi/ssdi? Still confused concerning income guidelines.
    TIA

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Janie,

      With only your husband’s income your children will qualify for about $120 each if your assets are within the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) limits of $3,000 for you and your husband and $2,000 for each of your children. If you parents have more than $3,00, the excess will be split and counted against the children’s limits. The list valuable car will count toward the parental limit. The countable value is the equity value, which is the retail value reduced by the amount owed on the vehicle. If you are not sure whether your assets are low enough, file an application to get a determination. (I do not know what SAHM is, if it involves income that could affect payment amount.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Sy

    Hello my son just moved back with me from dad’s house and I’m now his payee I work now making 9 bucks a hour,my hours vary from 25 to 30 I get paid biweekly I was told to report wages starting in June how much will he be receiving if I’m working receiving wages

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Sy,

      In months that you are paid two pay checks your child will be eligible for $733. Twice a year when you receive three checks, he will be eligible for $718. This assumes that he does not receive child support or other income.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Dee

    If my husband and I apply for SSI would be qualify? He only works and we have two children one who is special needs and the other who isnt? He makes gross 4,100.8 I dont want to waste time applying as the process is very long if we arent going to qualify? Also do they check other financial resources ? AS we were $ awarded an amount due to an accident.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Dee,

      Income and resources are checked and need to be documented. The maximum for you and your husband is $3,000 countable resources. Any excess would be split and half would be counted against each disabled child’s $2,000 resource limit. If your assets are within the limit, each of your children would receive about $370.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Dee

        What is considered as an Asset for SSI? So they would count the awarded amount as income too? It was a large amount that was awarded to my husband.

        • Dee

          what are the income limits? As some months have more weeks, how do they calculate it?

          • Kay Derochie

            Dear Dee,

            The income limits vary depending on whose income it is, the disabled adult’s or his spouse and whether the income is earned or unearned. Because you mention weeks, I surmise you are talking about work earnings.

            SSI benefits are calculated monthly. For the purpose of counting income for SSI income limits, the money counts in the month it is received. For purposes of determining whether a disabled person is performing substantial gainful activity for remaining disabled according to Social Security law, earnings are counted when earned.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Dee,

          Your husband’s SSI back pay will become a countable resource (asset) the first of the ninth calendar month after he received it.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Dee

            I’m so confused. My husband isn’t disabled. we have 2 kids and 1 is special needs. The award I’m referring too isn’t ssi. It’s an injury settlement my husband received so I asked if that will count as an “asset” per ssi guidelines? We have not finished application and we aren’t going to qualify why go through all the paper work.

            • Kay Derochie

              Dear Dee,

              I believe that the settlement will count as income in the month that it is received and any of the money that is left on the first of the following month will count as a resource that following month. However, I suggest that you file the financial portion of the application just to be sure that there are not exceptions for this type of income. If your child is not financially eligible, you do not need to complete the medical part of the application.

              Sincerely,
              Kay

          • Dee

            If we aren’t going to qualify why continue woth process.. As we aren’t not sure if we even would because of injury settlement?

            • Kay Derochie

              Dear Dee,

              See my response of a moment ago to your last post.

              Sincerely,
              Kay

          • Dee

            Thank you. Where can I find the financial portion of the application? Can I just submit just that and not medical information? Also can you attach a website link to your response.

  • Sally

    Hi,

    I am at the beginning stages of filing SSI for my child. He has hydrocephalus, microcephaly and cerebral palsy, among other conditions that are causing impairment. I stopped working a few months ago and we are now a single income household of 4 members (two parents and two children). He makes about $32K so income wise I believe we are under the limits. However, I have a $15K 401k that will put us over the resource limit. Is there a safe way to transfer/cash in the 401K? I read that the transfer penalty does not apply to deemable assets or I am misunderstanding? The cash from the 401k will help us pay some bills such as student loans, and credit card bills. Thank you!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Sally,

      Retirement accounts do count as resources for SSI. Transferring a 401K to another retirement account would not count as a withdrawal (income) but it would not keep it from counting as a resource. You could cash in the account or part of it and use it for the things your mentioned or to buy you and your husband and your disabled child each a $1,500 irrevocable burial insurance policy, which is not a countable resource. You do not have to spend down to zero. You and your husband have a $3,000 limit. Any excess counts toward your son’s $2,000 limit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Pam

    Hello. I am on SSI and receive $212/month. My husband is on SSDI and receives $920/month. We also receive $335/month for my son off of my husband’s SSDI. Our 16 year old (only child, no disabilities) would like to get a job. Will this affect our Social Security benefits?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Pam,

      Your son can earn up to $15,720 gross per year before his Social Security benefits will be affected. Your SSI benefits can be calculated one of two ways–either with you and your husband as an eligible couple or with him as an ineligible spouse with income deemed for the support of your child. The child doesn’t enter into the eligible couple calculation. For that reason, I don’t think your son’s earnings will affect your SSI. What will happen is that the amount of SSI payable may be split between you and your husband and paid in two payments–one for him and one for you. I suggest that you ask SSA to perform a hypothetical calculation before your son starts working to be sure.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Lmw337

    Thank you for taking time to read this. My 2 year old was just diagnosed with Autism and we want to know if we qualify.

    I make $3200/m. My girlfriend is a stay at home mom. I have a son from a previous marriage who lives with us half the time, I pay $100/m in child support. We have 3 children who live with us full time. My daughter who was diagnosed, her son from a previous relationship (she receives $374/m in child support), and another son who is six months old.

    We also are caretakers for my fiancés adult brother who is also disabled and collects SSI.

    Do we qualify for assistance?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Lmw337,

      Your child is financially eligible for SSI based on family income. The family assets also have to fall within the limits, which are $3,000 for you and your girlfriend and $2,000 for your disabled child. If you have more than $3,000, the excess counts toward the child’s $2,000 limit. A home you live in and one car are excluded. The equity value of additional cars, certain life insurance policies, bank accounts, and most other financial instruments are countable. If you are uncertain about which of your assets count, file an application to get a formal decision.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Amanda

    Hi there my son was approved for SSI , i get 733.00 , and my step son gets the same amount. We also recive 300.00 from my farther in law for rent as we own our home and he rents from us. And i also get 280.00 a month as well.. how much will my son get a month…

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Amanda,

      If your son is eighteen or older and is not paying his share of shelter and food expenses if you share food, he will receive less than $733, possibly as low as $488.67 until he starts contributing.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Gigi

    If the father of the child does not live in the home with the child, will the Social Security office force me to apply for child support? The father is involved with his son and provides material things that my son needs but does not give me money.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Gigi,

      I don’t think that applying for SSI for your child forces you to sue for child support. If the father is providing food or paying the rent or utilities (power, heat, water/sewer and garbage) directly, you have to declare that. The value of the food and/or half of shelter payments will count as income. (The occasional restaurant meal or occasional take-out pizza would not have to be reported.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Ashley

    Hi,

    My 4 yr old daughter is special needs receiving benefits. My fiancé makes about 4,000 a month and we have 3 other children. Does he make too much for my daughter to keep her benefits if we got married? Also, he has another child he pays child support too 600 a month, do they minus that out of his income?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ashley,

      The child support that your fiance pays would be considered in calculating your disabled child’s SSI payment amount. Currently, with the number of non-disabled children being supported, your child’s SSI benefit would not be affected by your finance’s work income.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Semone Albright

    My grandson who receives SSI may need to live me for awhile so that he can get physical and occupational therapy several times a week. His parents also want to make me his permanent payee. I own and am living in my house but I need to sell it because it needs too many repairs. Will my financial situation affect his disability?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Semone,

      Your exact same question (same wording) was asked by Darla. I answered her inquiry. You might take a look at that.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • DARLA KOLOJACO

    My grandson who receives SSI may need to live me for awhile so that he can get physical and occupational therapy several times a week. His parents also want to make me his permanent payee. I own and am living in my house but I need to sell it because it needs too many repairs. Will my financial situation affect his disability?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Darla,

      Your finances do not affect your grandchild’s SSI payment amount. However, if he does not pay fair market value (FMV) for room and board or pay his share of shelter and food expenses, his SSI will be reduced. His share are total expenses divided by the number of people in the household. (If his food is bought separate due to diet, for example, then FMV would be for room only and his share would be of shelter expenses only. Shelter expenses include power, heat, water/sewer, garbage, rent or mortgage, property tax, and if required by the lender property insurance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • tara

    I have two children, one is autistic. She gets 733.00 per month. I am wanting to have my boyfriend move in with us. I am currently in college full time so I have no income. He makes 1600.00 gross a month. But he has three vehicles. One has a monthly payment, the other two have engine issues and are not working. My question is will anything that I’ve mentioned affect my daughters eligibility? Also, how can I figure out the value they would apply to the other vehicles that are not running? He is currently allowing me to drive the running car to school when he is not working, is that an issue as well? Thank you.

    • tara

      I should also mention he is not the father of the autistic child, but he is the father of the other child. Thanks.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tara,

      This response considers both your posts. Your boyfriend’s income and assets are not considered in determining your disabled daughter’s SSI benefit amount because you are not married. If you start to have income, the support he gives the daughter you have in common may reduce the usual allotment of your income that would be dedicated to her support and Might, but not necessarily, indirectly affect your daughter’s benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Tara

        Thank you. I have another question. I was reading about fair market values of homes and such and he owns the house I currently live in. Once he moves in my rent will be dropped to 600. That’s not what usually homes in the area I’m in rent for. Will that also have a major effect on her ssi?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Tara,

          If you are to be a renter in the household, then the FMV would be for room rental with living area privileges not for a whole house. However, it is difficult to establish that you are a renter if you and your boyfriend share a bedroom. Accordingly, your child’s SSI payment amount will likely be calculated based on whether or not he is paying his share of shelter expenses (and his share of food if you all share food). His share is the total expenses divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance. If he does not pay his share, his benefit will be reduced by the amount of his share he is not paying less $20. The maximum reduction is $244.33.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Tara

            But his assets still won’t be deemed?

            • Kay Derochie

              Dear Tara,

              That is right because you are not married to him.

              Sincerely,
              Kay

      • Tara

        Sorry for all the questions, I’ve just also read if I have access to his assets (car) that his income can start to be deemed, I’ve also read that 1/3 of his income will be deemed because we live together, as well as possibly if he pays over his share it will start to be deemed. Just wanna clear up my understanding as it is quite complicated because all the ssi sites talk in terms of husband and wife and not boyfriends/girlfriends.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Tara,

          See my response to your other question of the same date. Your boyfriend’s income and assets do not affect your disabled child’s SSI payment amount because he is not your husband and he is not the child’s father.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • owensmama

    I have two children, they are half-siblings both with different disabilities. My daughter receives $900 in child support, my son receives $0 in child support. I earn $800 a month in self-employment income. I live in California. My questions are concerning how much my daughter would be entitled too. Since the $900 in child support is more than the $889 disability benefit in California, does that mean my daughter is ineligible? Or do they go ahead and calculate it from the start at the 2/3 amount of child support, do the calculation formula, etc.?
    Also, since my daughter’s unearned income is over the deduction amounts, is any part of that child support income received for my daughter counted as my unearned income for determining my sons eligibility?

    • owensmama

      Also, forgot to mention, the child support is collected from the child support office, so in all but two months, the amount received is $830/month. Do they count that or do they count the full $900 even though I only receive two months a year of more than $830 a month?

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Owensmama,

        Please see my response to your first question. SSI is calculated month by month, so in months that your daughter receives only $830 child support, she would be eligible for a small amount of SSI if California pays a state supplement when income is too high for federal payment, which is $733.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Owensmama,

      Your daughter is not eligible for SSI because all but $20 of her child support is countable income for SSI, so her countable income is slightly above the limit.

      Your son is financially eligible for SSI. Your daughter’s child support means that none of your income is excluded for her support when calculating your son’s benefit. Even so, your current income of $800 is low enough that it will not reduce your son’s payment amount if he is medically approved.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Heather Hughes

    I have a question. I am a single mom going through a divorce. Both of my sons receive ssi payments of $733 each. My oldest is 20 and my youngest is 16. We are looking at child support for them, (If a child is disabled and an adult, there is still a responsibility to support them), about $600 all together. I am starting a party time job that will be about $500 a month. I will be paying about $1000 in rent and have a used car that is paid off. How will any of this affect their payments? Thank you!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Heather,

      If each of your children receives $300 in child support, each of their benefits will go down by $280. Your earningsof any amount are not considered in calculating your nineteen-year-old’s benefits. Your $500 a month earnings are low enough that they will not affect the sixteen-year-old’s benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Misty Hatfield

    Hi, I have a complicated situation. my Husband who is my two childerns step father get Social Security in the amount of 1041 dollars a month. He has two childern that do not live with us that get some money from SSA. He also works part and makes 10 dollars an hour so 800 dollars a month. I do not have a job but I was planning on getting a part time job when my kindergartenergy goes to first grade. I have two childern who both receive SSI. Their day pays $670 a month in child support so 335 for each child. How do all these incomes affect each of the benefits?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Misty,

      A certain amount of work income is excluded as a work incentive–the first $65 plus half of the excess. $1,100 is allocated (excluded) for your and your husband’s support. The balance of parental income is split in half and counted to reduce your children’s SSI benefits, which are also reduced by $315 of the child support. The Social Security your husband’s children receive does not affect you children’s SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Misty Hatfield

        So even if it is unearned income there is still an allocation for my husband and I of 1100 dollars? If this is correct then it sounds like my husbands SSDI doesn’t really affect it since it is less then 1100 dollars. My kids SSI is still affected by 800 dollars of earned income and child support of 670. So each is reduced to about 300. does that sound right?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Misty,

          I calculate that your children’s SSI will each be reduced by $134 for you and husband’s income, plus a reduction for their child support. The benefit calculation is done in a certain order. You can see how that was calculated by using the formula in the sample calculation in the article where you posted your question.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Marie

    Hi, my 3 year old was recently diagnosed with autism & I Wanted to know if she would be able to get benefits? I am a stay at home mom & my husband makes $4000 for a family of 6. 4 children in total including my daughter diagnosed with autism. He works 7 months of the year, after that the company lays him off. We pay morgage, car, & utilities ect. Do you think my child would qualify

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Marie,

      In months that your husband is working, your child will qualify financially for SSI benefits. Unearned (non-work) income does not have the same exclusions as earned income. This means that whether or not your daughter qualifies in months that your husband is drawing unemployment will depend on the amount of unemployment he receives. Report wages and other income changes monthly by the tenth of the month to avoid overpayments.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Rosse

    Hi I have one question… We are a family of five, 3 children (8,11 and 14 years old), and my husband. Our monthly income is 1,500 monthly. My husband had to leave one of his two jobs to help me with the care of our daughter who is sick and needs to be watched. Her diagnosis is DDMD, ODD, Depression and signs of squizofrenia. I suffer from major depression, PTSD, anxiety disorder. We got help from Food Stamps. We pay $ 300 monthly for our car and $ 930 (rent) + utilities. Do you think my daughter will be approved for SSI and what would be the benefit of it?

    Thanks in advance!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Rosse,

      Your daughter is financially eligible and may be medically eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. If you are unable to work due to your mental health conditions, you might qualify also.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Rosse

        Thank you so much for your help!

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Rosse.

  • Ashley

    My daughter receives SSI. She is blind and autistic also has turners syndrome. Only her blindness is on record, her medical review has not been up yet. So they have not added the other conditions. I recently got married. My now husband (her step-dad) makes about $4200 a month $2800 adjusted. We just had a new baby together with no disability. Also we pay 1,225 in rent and just financed a new car together. How badly will her benefits be affected? How much she we expect to see?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ashley,

      About $578 of your husband’s income will reduce your daughter’s SSI benefit beginning two calendar months after your marriage. You need to report your marriage right away. Take proof of your husband’s income and also take the birth certificate for your new baby to prove the additional dependent needing support.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Ashley

        Kay,

        Does having multiple conditions add to the amount she receives? I cant get a direct answer on when they will add the autism to her case. Thank you for your replies.

        Ashley

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Ashley,

          The payment calculation is the same for disability based on a single conditions as for disability based on multiple conditions.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Isabela

    Hello
    Great article ! I just had a child not disabled wondering if that would affect my childs SSI payment

    I receive 3120 gross from work and 209 in child support, I pay rent 850.00 and all utilites

    Can you help me understand how it will change my sons SSI payment? THANK YOU!!

    • Isabela

      the child receiving SSI is seven yr old

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Isabela,

      An additional child to care for could raise your disabled son’s SSI benefit if he is not already receiving $733. Report the birth as soon as you have a birth certificate.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Isabela

        If you can ? how do you calculate $733 because at the current time I receive 125.15. THANK you again with you help!!!

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Isabela,

          I was not saying that your child’s SSI would go up to $733. I meant to say that $733 is the maximum. You did not say whether your disabled child had other income, so I could not do a calculation. Your child’s SSI should go up by $369 because $369 of your wages will be excluded for the support of your recently born child.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • JC

    My son is autistic, he is four years old. I am self employed and I make about 25,000.00 a year and 12,000.00 adjusted gross income. I have 808.00 a month in child support which will soon increase to 1000.00 a month. I also have another child who does not have a disability which makes a household of three. How much can u expect for my son?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear JC,

      If your assets are below the SSI limit, your child will be financially eligible for the maximum $733.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Crystal

    I am going to begin working soon and I have two disable children and three total and two disable they draw 1466 a month I am going to be working 40 a week at 13.10 an hour. Will that cut down there checks or will it be stoppes

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Crystal,

      In months that you get four weekly paychecks or two bi-weekly paychecks, your children’s SSI will not be reduced. In months in which there is an extra check (every third month if paid weekly and every six months if paid bi-weekly) your children’s benefits will be reduced but not terminated. Be sure to report your wages monthly.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Victoria

    I have 2 children that have been approved for ssi my husband meets all income requirements and I am a stay at home parent with 2 other children I pay 550 in rental fees I was told I will be eligible for the full amount what would I receive for my kids age 5 autism and adhd and 1 developmental and autism child.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Victoria,

      The maximum benefit for each of your children is $733.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Amanda

    My husband and I have just had our second child diagnosed with autism. We are a family of 5 and my husband is the only one working, his salary is 6,090 a month gross. We have 2 vehicles paying a note on 1. Being that we have 2 diagnosed would they qualify for ssi?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Amanda,

      I am calculating that your family is just a little bit over the income level–only about $20 for each child. I suggest that you file a claim for each child taking in your husband’s pay stubs to get a formal decision. If they are financially eligible, then you can complete all the medical forms. (The car with the higher equity value will be excluded and the equity value of the other will be counted toward the resource limits. You and your husband can have $3,000. Half of any excess resources will count toward each child’s $2,000 resource limit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Amber L Bolton

    I make $22.16 per hour and work 40 hours per week. Times this by 4 and it comes to a monthly income of $3545.60. My 8 year old son has recently been diagnosed with ADHD combined type and dyslexia mixed type. We live alone and do not have any other income. Is it even worth it to apply? I think I may make too much money by ssi’s standards. Am I right?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Amber,

      You are correct. Your earnings are too high for your son to qualify financially for Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • S.Miller

    Hello, I’m a mother with a 5 year old son who has autism and he just started to receive his ssi. At the time when we first applied my income was counted only which $1756.80 a month, his father unemployed, and two other kids that dont receive ssi. Our home rental was 695.00 at that time. Some changes have been made just recently. I still make 1756.80 per month and his farther now makes 630 a week before taxes. We have moved to another home which is 750.00 a month now. My son receives 733.00 a month. How will these changes affect his ssi payments?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear S. Miller,

      The increase in family wages will result in a substantial reduction in your child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. You need to report all wages by the tenth of the month following the month the wages are received. You also need to report your move; however, the move will not affect benefits as long as the members of the household don’t change.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Si

  • Nin

    Hi my son got approved for ssi. I gross roughly 1800 a month. I’m a single parent with no other kids. I pay rent and have one car. What would his ssi amount be monthly?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Nin,

      If no one is paying for rent, utilities, or food for you and your son, his benefit will be about$674.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • JSimon

    Hi, I have a son who is self employed and his net income is $14,550 or $13.522 Adjusted Gross income. The net comes out to be $1,212.50 a month. He has 2 boys who live with him both under 18 and 1 who is Autistic and receives $700 a month SSI. He also has to pay $120 child support a month on 2 other children, plus $400 house payment, $1,782 a year property taxes, and $74.50 per month house insurance. He also pays $20 a week for someone to watch the Autistic son while he’s working. They are reviewing his SSI. Will his son still get SSI? The Formula for Calculating Amount of SSI Child Will Receive is driving me nuts…… Thanks

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear JSimon,

      Assuming your son is paying all his family’s shelter and food costs and the family’s only income is his work, only his work earnings and the number of children he is supporting affect his son’s SSI. $369 is allotted for the non-disabled child in the home and $249 for each of the children not in the home ($369 – $120). There is also an allotment for his own support. Accordingly, your grandson will still be eligible for SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • sherry

    hi I had a question my boyfriend just currently moved in with me and my two disabled sons both have autism one is 15 and the other is 21 years old.My boyfriend doesn’t currently have a regular job but does odd jobs to get by, is it ok he moves in and what is the process, I’m so confused with the whole thing he isn’t the father of either child. please help!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Sherry,

      Your boyfriend’s income does not affect your children’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. As long as you boyfriend does not pay more than his one-quarter share of rent, shelter utilities, and food, his being in the household will not affect the benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Michelle

    Hi,
    My daughter recently just got fully approved for SSI. Her dad and I are not married but we live together with 2 ineligible children. He is self-employed and I am not working but I am going to school. I receive $517 a month in child support for my first child. I can’t find anywhere about how they count income for being self-employed and what they consider deductions and what income is counted. On average his net income a month is $3200.00. Any help or advice would be appreciated. Thanks.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Michelle,

      Net profit from self-employment is the income that is considered in determining your child’s SSI payment amount. If your disabled child’s father’s is a sole propriety, his Schedule C tax form will list the expenses the IRS accepts. Usually Social Security accepts all of them except depreciation. None of his income will be allocated for your child who receives child support.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • GF

    Hello!
    I recently found out my unborn child has Non-mosaic T21. I do understand this qualifies for SSI. My questions are;
    1. I am separated (living in my own rented home) with 3 other minor children. This child is #4. Will the baby qualify for payment? My gross income is $4600 and I own a newer vehicle that I pay monthly. I do not receive monetary child support because my estranged spouse (soon to be divorced) covers the children’s medical insurance as well as tution for my children.

    2. When do I apply? Upon birth?

    3. Does it matter that I will need to take 12+ weeks maternity due to surgeries the baby will need upon birth? Only 2 of those weeks are paid?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear GF,

      It is possible that your child might be financially eligible for a reduced amount of SSI because of the number of other children you are supporting. You can apply for your child in the month of birth and should do so because there is no retroactivity. SSI is calculated monthly, so months that you are without pay will result in an increased in benefits. The maximum federal SSI benefit is $733.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Samantha

    Hi. I am currently receiving ssi of 733. I live with my father and my two daughters. One who was just approved for sis. I pay my dad 200 a month to stay with him and half the electric. We eat separately from him. How much will my daughter monthly payment be?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Samantha,

      If you are sharing and your share is $200, your daughter’s share is also $200 and you’ll need to have her pay that amount when her benefits start in order for her to receive maximum benefits. Her benefits up until she pays her share will probably be $488. When she starts paying her share (or rent), report it to Social Security so she can receive an increase at that time.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • I’m trying to apply for ssi for both of my kids both who are under 18 years old. I have a 6 year old boy who was diagnosed with autism and a 3 year old with a few learning disability’s . My husband brings home $898 GROSS but really it’s $580 a week. I’m a stay at home mom with no income. We also have 2 cars one is 2013 Silverado and a 2014 equinox that we pay on monthly so I was wondering if we would have to many assests to get ssi? I’m not even sure if my 3 year old would get qualified for ssi but we are trying anyway.

    • I’m new to the whole ssi thing I have no clue of how things go

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Marla,

        If you have a specific question, I will try to answer. Otherwise, you might try reading all the articles under the SSI tab on the navigation bar at the top of this website page.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

        • Alicia

          Hi Kay, my story is smiliar to this ladies,, however my 2kids receives ssi and I’m moving into a home with their dad(recently together again) I’m a stay at home mom and his monthly gross is 3300, how much will my kids receive now based on their fathers income?? We have two cars one car payment and house mortgage,, thank you

          • Kay Derochie

            Dear Alicia,

            Your children have to meet the resource limit which is $2,000 each. If your and their father’s countable assets exceed $3,000, the excess will be divided by two and counted toward each child’s resource limit. The car with the higher equity value will be excluded and the equity value of the second car will be counted toward the resource limit. Equity is the current retail value of the car reduced by the amount owed on it. Based on $3,300 gross earnings and no non-disabled children to support, your children will each be eligible for aobut $495 a month.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Marla,

      I think you may have either made a typographical error on the gross earnings or you meant $898 net a month. (Gross is before taxes.) If the gross is $580 a week and your children don’t have income, your child or children would be financially eligible based on income.

      The equity value of the car with the highest equity will count toward your and hour husband’s $3,000 resource limit. If your resources total more than $3,000, the excess counts toward your child’s $2,000 limit. If both children are eligible, then the excess is divided in half and half is charged to each child’s individual $2,000 limit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Candice

    Hello. My 8 year old son receives SSI for autism and speech impairment. Currently we are co-renting a house with a roommate; however, my mom and my sister have an old house they would like to give us to live in. If they give us the house and deed gets changed to my name, would my son loose his SSI? I am a single mom, I have one more year to graduate college. I am currently self employed cleaning houses occasionally, and my income isn’t very much.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Candice,

      The gift of a house in which you live will result in a $266 reduction in your son’s benefits two months after the house is transferred to your name. If you move into the house the same month as the deed is transferred to you, there will be no other reduction in benefits. Just an additional note: you do need to report the net profit from your house cleaning income. The first $65 a month ($85 if you have no other income) is excluded and won’t affect your child’s benefits. For every two dollars over $65 (or $85), your child’s SSI will be reduced by one dollar.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Jessica

        I have a question ..I am on ssi and my bf.works we don’t live together yet but plan on finding a place soon.we have 3 children together.he makes around 3000 a month and I get 889 monthly…since being a family of 5 will moving in with him affect my ssi even though we are not married? I am just curious what the income limit is for a family of 5?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Jessica,

          If you pay your share (one-fifth) of the shelter and food costs your benefits will not be affected by living with your boyfriend. Even if you were to marry, his $3,000 gross income would not affect your benefits if the children do not have income.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • DHER0208

    My daughter currently receives SSI and I would like to enroll into a 401K plan at work. Does that affect my daughter’s SSI benefits?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear HHERO208,

      The money in the 401k carried over month to month will count toward your daughter’s $2,000 Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit. If her employer also makes deposits, the employer deposits are likely to be countable income in the month of deposit. I don’t know whether the deposits will be treated as earned income so that only half is counted or they will be treated as unearned income with a dollar for dollar reduction in your daughter’s monthly SSI. The reduction will occur two months after the deposit if her income remains low enough for her to be eligible. I suggest that you talk with an SSI claim representative in your local office.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jason

    Hi I was wondering if owning two cars can effect my two sons from getting ssi I have,a family one and one I use for work I make about 1600 a month I live with my girlfriend and two sons who have autism.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jason,

      Ownership of cars and other property is not related to Supplemental Security Income (SSI) income limits. Such ownership is related to the SSI resource limits, which are $2,000 for you and $2,000 for each of your children. The lower valued car typically counts toward the resource limit. In figuring which car is less valuable, consider the equity value of each, that is the market value reduced by any amount you owe on the vehicle. If the second car is over $2,000, the excess value will be split between your two sons and charged against their $2,000 resource limits. Some exceptions are made; if you can prove that you need both vehicles because you cannot get to work without both vehicles because one is needed for your children’s frequent medical care, then the other car might be excluded as needed for self-support.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Edith

    Hello,
    My daughter receives $733 each month. My husband is the only one in the family who works and makes enough to pay for living expenses. We were planning to save up my daughters payments, we were thinking she could use them later on for school expenses (college) and buying a house of her own. Pretty much making sure she has a future when we leave this world. We lacked in SSI information, recently found out you have to spend her payments monthly. Account should not exceed 2,000. What can we do, if we feel she wouldn’t have much to spend her money on? I just wish that a miracle would happen, and doctors could tell us she’s gonna be okay for the rest of her life and no longer disabled.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Edith,

      To be eligible for $733, your daughter either has to pay her share of household expenses as part of your household or she has to pay fair market value for room and board. If your husband pays for her shelter and food, you must report it and her SSI will be reduced, probably to $488, because she doesn’t need money for food and housing. If you want to save for her to purchase a house for her after you and your husband die, you might consider talking with an attorney to put any money you can afford into in a special- use trust for her she cannot access and that upon your and your husband’s deathmust be used to purchase housing for her to live in. An estate attorney can advise you on how to structure the trust.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Moka

    Hello. I have four children total, three other children who do not receive disability benefits. One of my four children does. When I return to work my gross income will be around $2500 monthly. Will my childs benefit amount be reduced due to my income? If so what will the new amount be?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Moka,

      Your child’s benefits will not be reduced.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Moka

        Thank you. How much room to do I have for overtime before it affects her benefits? When I did the example from the article I came up with $657, which puts me near the $733. Is that when it changes once its more than the $733?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Moka,

          If the family’s only income is your wages and your wife’s SSI, then:

          The first $65 of your income doesn’t count.
          One-half of the excess above $65 doesn’t count.
          There is a $733 allotment for your support.
          There is a $369 allotment for each of your three children ($1107 total)

          After all exclusions are counted what is left is called deemed income and it reduces your wife’s current $733 benefit. To get a projected SSI payment amount, estimate your gross income with projected overtime and subtract these amounts. Any deemed amount above $20 will result in a reduction of her benefits. For example, if $100 is deemed, you SSI will be reduced by $80.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Moka

            Hello. I used my tax return to pay for rent for four months and to pay off three charge cards. My refund was roughly $8000. My daughter was approved approximately three wks ago but I am going through the pay process and waiting on the disbursment of checks. I was contacted recently about the spend down of my refund. I have gathered receipts and my bank statement. Is this a normal part of the approval process? Will the way I spent my refund effect my childs benefits and back award? What type of things can her income be used for? Does paying rent in advance hurt her benefit award?

            • Kay Derochie

              Dear Moka,

              It is routine to get proof that the money has been spent. Your daughter’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) back pay will not count against the resource limit for nine months after it is received so prepaying rent will likely not accomplish anything. If your daughter is under age eighteen and her benefit is more than six months benefits, you will have to open a Dedicated Account for the back pay and use of the back pay will be restricted and the money in the account willnot count toward the resource limit. You can read about Dedicated Accounts at https://secure.ssa.gov/poms.nsf/lnx/0200602140. If her benefits do not require deposit to a Dedicated account, her benefits can be used for shelter, food, clothing, medical and dental care, grooming, school supplies, entertainment, etc.

              Sincerely,
              Kay

          • Moka

            Still awaiting an answer please.

            • Kay Derochie

              Dear Moka,

              Please see my response of a few minutes ago.

              Sincerely,
              Kay

          • Moka

            The household only consist of myself (the mother) and my four children one of which receives disability. There is no wife I am woman with no husband. Does that $733 allotment count towards my one child receiving disability?

            • Kay Derochie

              Dear Moka,

              See my April 21 response to you that lists the income exclusions for each member of your family. Those exclusions are used to reduce the amount of countable income that will be considered in determining your disabled child’s benefit.

              Sincerely,
              Kay

          • Moka

            I am a single parent household. Do I receive a $733 allotment for self in addition to $367 per ineligible child?

            • Kay Derochie

              Dear Moka,

              Please see my response to the post you put up right before this one.

              Sincerely,
              Kay

  • melissa

    I’m also in florida

  • melissa

    Hello my son receives 733 in ssi benefits…I just recently started working at the end of January many a monthly income between 900 and 1200. How will his benefits be affected

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Melissa,

      Your income is not high enough to affect your daughter’s SSI benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Tj

    I have 3yr old twins with disabilities and no other children. Combined household income of 2 parents is $5000. Does having two disabled children and no other children effect the deeming charts/calculations? All the info I see is related to unqualified other children and calculating benefits for one child.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear TJ,

      By my calculation, your children are not financially eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) federal payment. You can check this by using the formula in the sample calculation in the article you posted under. Once you get the amount of income to be deemed, divide it by two. That amount will be charged to each of your children. If it is over $754 each, they are not eligible for a federal SSI payment. Some states pay an SSI supplement that allows slightly higher income. You can either check with your local office Social Security office to see what your state may offer.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Mellisa

    Hi. I have a daughter that was approved for ssi. She was getting the maximum at 756. Our household consists of two adults and two other children 3 if you count her. My question is I recently accepted a job where I make 1125 a month earned. Will her amount go down? Thank you in advance.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Melissa,

      If your earnings are $1,125 gross and that and the SSI is the only income your family has, your child’s SSI will not be reduced. You do need to report the work and submit pay stubs monthly.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Sarah

    Hello – I have 2 children with autism and 2 children that are non-disabled. Our monthly income is 4200 per month. Do we make too much for our two autistic children to qualify for SSI? I don’t want to go through the application process if it’s clear that we make too much. We also have two vehicles, don’t know if that matters? Thanks for any info someone can provide!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Sarah,

      Your family earnings are not to high assuming that the $4,200 is gross earnings and the children don’t have any income. As parents your resource limit is $3,000; each disabled child’s resource limit is $2,000. Usually the vehicle with the lower equity value (value minus amount owed) counts toward the resource limits. In some circumstances a second vehicle will be excluded such as both are needed for two people to go to work. (for example, they cannot carpool or take public transportation.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • candace

    Hello I have a disabled daughter that is receives $$733 a month in SSI monthly in Georgia. I don’t work and have 2 other children in the home I receive $200 monthly for one of my children. My husband and I are separated but are thinking about getting back together he makes $370 gross weekly. How much would her benefits be cut down?

    • candace

      So mine and his income monthly together is $1680 without my disabled daughters ssi included in that total.

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Candace,

        Please see my reply to your first post.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Candace,

      Based on the information you provided, I calculate that your daughter’s benefit will not be reduced unless your husband is paid biweekly. If he is every six months, he will receive a third paycheck, which will cause your daughter’s SSI to be reduced two months later by about $150..

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • angie

    hi i have a 6 year old son that is reciving $733 of ssi for his speach and adhd my husband makes 1,600 a month and i will start working and will start makeing about 1000 a month that makes a total of 2,600 i also have 2 other children not reciving ssi will this affect my sons ssi benifits we live in florida and we pay $900 in rent and all other bills we have 1 car

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Angie,

      If your two other children are under age eighteen and the family has no unearned income, your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment amount will not be affected by your and your husband’s work earnings.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • angie

        hi yes my other children are under age one is 1 and the other one is 4 but will his ssi benefits go down or stay the same? does ss go by tje rent and bills you pay ?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Angie,

          Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits are not calculated based on what your bills are. Payment amounts are based on your income. If your boyfriend is providing free or subsidized food and/or housing for your disabled children, then their SSI will be reduced because they are receiving in-kind (non-cash) income in the form of food and/or housing.

          If on the other hand, you are paying your share of rent or mortgage and property tax (and property insurance if the lender requires it) for yourself and your two children and either buy food separately from your boyfriend or pay your and your children’s share, your children’s SSI will not be reduced. Your family’s share is three-quarters because there are four people in the household and three in your family unit. The maximum reduction for in-kind (non-cash) support and maintenance results in a benefit of $488 for each child, assuming they do not have other income.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Theresa Moore

    My Husband and I were separated last year. We also have a disabled son who is 22. Husband made $8000 for the year total income. Will it affect our SSI benefits when he claims taxes this year? My son and I receive a total of 1466. per month.

    • Theresa Moore

      Also My Husbands is cash income so I don’t understand the deemed income part of it

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Theresa,

        Please see my reply of a few minutes ago to your earlier post. How income is handled is not governed by how it is paid–by check or in cash. Deemed income means that after the earned income exclusion, and after an allowance for your husband to support himself and any minor children in the household, any remainder is deemed (considered) available for your support to reduce your SSI payment amount.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

        • shelma

          Hello
          My husbands income is about $1,400 a month..
          There is 5 of us.. One of my children receives SSI..
          I do not work I stay at home with our baby. Will my sons SSI be taken away? Does my husband make too much?

          • Kay Derochie

            Dear Shelma,

            Your husband’s earnings are not high enough to reduce your child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

            Sincerely,
            Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Theresa,

      Your husband’s income potentially can affect your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) only in months that he lived with you.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Amanda

    Hello, my question is about deemed insutuional. What exactly does that mean? Right now we receive SSI for my son who has CHARGE Syndrome. One Part of the effect of it is that he is profoundly deaf. (Can’t hear at all) We turn in our check stubs every month and his payment changes monthly due to that. A teacher at a deaf school mentioned that we could deem him insutuional since what he has will never go away and by us doing that, that he would get the same amount every month and we wouldn’t have to deal with turning in our checks stubs every month. Is that true? How does that work?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Amanda,

      I am going to take a guess at what what I think the teacher meant. If your son comes home for vacations so that your home is his home and he is away at school when he resides at the deaf school, his parents’ earnings impact his benefit amount. If on the other hand, his primary residence year around is the school then he may be considered living in the institution and not your home. Accordingly, your income would not affect his benefits.

      Things to consider: if he is not part of your household and you pay for his room and board or part of his room and board at the school, your payments would cause his benefits to be lowered possibly as low as $488 a month. Any cash you gave him on a regular basis (or irregular and infrequent and not exceeding $60 per calendar quarter) for spending money would also be income to him. If the school is a government facility, he might not be eligible for SSI at all. If the school is considered a medical treatment facility and Medicaid pays more than 50% of the expenses, he would be eligible for $30 a month. In summary, before you make any decisions gather information from the school about its funding and from Social Security about what constitutes residing in an institution. Also, there’s the issue of what is the real situation, that is, is he really a child of your household just away at school part of the time?

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Amanda

        Hello, he is in a county class and lives at home. So I’m not sure what the teacher meant by what to do to being able to talk to the people at the social security office so that my son would get the same amount every month.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Amanda,

          I don’t know either. You might ask her if you want to pursue the question further.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • MEL CARPENTER

    I have a 11 year old son who was approved for SSI Benefits. I think they are not calculating the benefit amount correctly because every time I question them on the benefit amount they are calculating they tell me they made a mistake and the benefit amount changes. However, it still does not come out to what I have calculated myself based on all the worksheets I can find. Can you tell me what he should be receiving? I am a single mom of 3 kids and we live in NY. Only 1 child would be the only person in the household receiving benefits. I have unearned income from unemployment in the amount of 1413 monthly and earned income of 351 monthly. I also receive 329 a month in child support for all 3 kids.

    Thank you
    Mel

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Mel,

      I figure about $34 is payable to your child.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Bethany

    Hi I have a 7 year old son who has duchenne muscular dystrophy a fetal illness my husband and I make about 4,000 a month before taxes are taken out and own 3 vehicles will my child quality for any amount of ssi

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Bethany,

      If you an your husband are not supporting other minor children, your family income is too high for your son to receive SSI. The limit on earned income for two parents and no non-disabled children is $3,791 a month. The resource limit for parents is $3,000. Any excess counts toward your son’s $2,000 limit. The equity value of the two least valuable vehicles would count toward those limits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jennifer

    My daughters case came up for review and she was classed as .. CAS but now speaks fine but now has been diagnosed by her doctor as having ADHD and is getting pull ups cause she has a hard time going to the restroom cause she doesn’t want to stop what she’s doing to go.. she was on meds but I didn’t like the zombie affect it had on her so I use positive reinforcement to get her on track cuz she’s always getting distracted. Instead of using meds.. my question is how does social security not know why she goes and sees a behavior specialist and now what she has and they still have her as only CAS and will she get denied and have to start the appeal or will they go by what she is now diagnosed with… thank you so much.. any advice is appreciated

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jennifer,

      Your daughter’s continuing eligibility will be assessed based on her current condition, so you need to be sure that her medical and school records for the last year get submitted and that you explain why she is not on medications and anything else that might not show up in her medical records.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • i’m sorry i said that wrong My son is 4 and autistic and has ADHD. he just won his case. I only get 900 a social security, my son gets an auxiliary payments from my disablity of 262. making are ONLY asset and unearned income 1162. I live in Maryland. What are his payments going to be.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tina,

      See my response of a few minutes ago to your first post.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • My son just won his case. I am also disabled . I receive 900 a month and 262 supplement payment for him making my income 1162. Since he is now disabled I know his supplement will stop but how much would His payments be. I have no other resources. I rent,don’t own a car, I get food stamps ,etc. His dad doesn’t live with us and will buy him toys and baby sit but no money so that is no income either. How much will HIS payments be.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tina,

      The $262 Social Security dependent benefits your son receives will probably continue and all but $20 will be counted as income in determining his SSI payment amount. If the $900 is your gross benefit before Medicare premiums or taxes, about $167 of your income will count towards determining your son’s benefit. Accordingly, I estimate his benefit will be about $404 ($733 minus his $167 and minus $262).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • I wrote my question wrong, My sons supplemental income is actaully 262 auxiliary payment off of my disability ,so does that mean he will get both or will the auxiliary stop. He is 4 and I have been getting the auxiliary payments for about 3 years. Besides that my ONLY income is the 907 disablity I get. I do not have any medicare premiums because I get both state and federal benefits what ever that means

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Tina,

          My previous reply is still correct, except the estimate will be $7 less because previously you said you were getting $900 and you have now corrected that to $907.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Rebekah

    Hello. My son was just diagnosed with Autism, SPD and PDD.. we have 5 total in the household, 3 of which are children. My husband is the only one working and that is the only income. His approx gross is $1175 bi-weekly. Do we qualify for SSI in Oklahoma and if so, how much would our payment be? Thanks In Advance- R. Cavazos

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Rebekah,

      If your children have no income and the family’s assets are below the SSI resource limits and if your son qualifies medically, his benefit will be $773 in months his father has two paychecks. Every six months he will be paid three times causing your son’s benefit to be reduced for one month to about $500. The reduction occurs two months after the month of higher pay.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • letter330

    I hope you can help with this unusual one. It has two scenarios, married and sep/divorced. The end nutshell is easier for this reason, see below.

    Judge awarded me SSI 11/2013 (adult). Local SSA told me to go away. It took 11 months with OIG’s and Congressional help, to make then honor judges decision. They issued retro SSI turn of Oct. 2014, 14k owed. Finished math errors by Nov. 2014 a bit more issued. Case went onto system Nov. 2014 very late, in no-pay status T51. The POMS says honor decision at once, and rules go from there on how long to keep case on sys. Because, a win has a reasonable expectation for it to remain in effect a substantial amount of time per POMS. So this is highly abnormal for the 11 month contempt.

    Someone went into negative time fashion to decide to code it as “never an ssi payment” T51. This differs in that no notice of impending closure has to be sent to client, like previous SSI given, code T31, tells client month prior to intent of closure. The case closed for October 2015 despite informing them timely I had divorced mid Sept. 2015. I separated in July 2015.

    Because ex had 1208 gross disabled SSDI, they were claiming all of it was mine, tho its 2 disabled adults in the home. Not counting son as deduction because he got ssdi off the ex first half 2015. I had medicaid all year, because there are rules when 2 adults are both disabled, different than simple deeming onto one disabled, for DHS. Back in May, my son was getting 302 from Ex’s claim, when we were married, and I had to split it as mother 302. (total 604 ssdi between us). SSA had denied child’s claim against ex, and reconsideration same; only when pressed to honor my Award of SSI, did they choose to go back and honor that (not my request). In May this sharing ended 2015 when child became 16, so my income was zero again.
    Since July’s separation, August should be zero deeming ssi eligible. The no-pay ssi claim ending by system October, when eligible before that, was not reopened so far and found out, worker on phone closing son due to divorce, had asked for original Decree mailed, then called back said DONT mail decree – lawyer said this was a trick to keep Decree out of file and snub my SSI eligibility by the divorce/separation. We then did his advice bringing it up to the SSA office this week in person. The lawyer states they are compelled to go back and fix my SSI to august, and reopen it without reapplying. The worker is not replying since I found out in Oct. re the surprise closure as I called ssa, and her job when I notified Oct. 1 of the divorce by letter, should have been to ask for the original Decree if thats what was needed, yet they didnt. SSA is disagreeing with lawyer (SSA type) that they dont have to fix my SSI. It was a twenty year horror disabled with a perm/total cert from MD 1996 onwards, and it seems they love to try and force reapp on people (even just after my win, this was the stall eleven months contempt, “reapply” malarkey). Are they supposed to fix it?
    The horror part, is in a Sec. 8 apartment, cant get my own voucher without completely new wait list application, have to stay here camped in LR with ex; 604 of son’s benefit ended for October, since divorced not natural child of ex; now son and I have zero income, and have to wait for own apartment sec. 8, totally poverty again with zero options. Not going to a shelter fifth time in 20 years with my child. It is amazing they would bend POMS without a decree to end son’s bennie, but not do the same to consider his mom now divorced taking care with no income, doesnt need her SSI.

    Nov. 2014 SSI open no pay, then-spouse disabled also SSDI 1208 before mcare.
    Child getting 302, mom sharing kids bennie 302, nixed 273 ssi per ssa.
    May 2015, Child 16, no more sharing; 1208 spouse SSDI, mom zero, no ssi, son
    604 ssdi kids.
    July 2015, separated, deeming ends next month;
    Sept. 2015, divorced, son’s 604 ssdi ended October, mom zero income. No ssi?
    Oct. 2015 case auto-closed coded “never got ssi” when certainly did. No notice.

    Thanks – SSA is definitely shocking and dont see anybody else getting this awful treatment.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Letter 330,

      Your situation is complicated but it comes down to the following general laws: no deeming applies while divorced and deeming applies while married. Second basic is to get SSI you are required to apply for all other benefits, hence, being put on your wife’s record as a young spouse with a child in your care. The third, is that to get un-reduced SSI, you have to pay your share of housing or pay market value rent while living with your ex-wife. Changes in eligibility factors should all be applied including for past months.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jenny

    Hello my ? Is my two children receive ssi I don’t work anymore. They both receive 733 each month. I’m thinking of getting back with my childrens father who makes around 2200 mth sometimes less cause he a roofer and if it rains no work..lol how would that affect my children’s benefits ..

    • Jenny

      I also have a car worth about 1000 and I’m paying on a rent to own house 975mth

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jenny,

      My rough estimate is that your children’s SSI would go down to about $164 each when their father earned $2,200.

      This assumes that the family would not have excess resources. If there are two vehicles in the family one might count toward the $3,000 resource limit for you and the children’s father. Half of excess resources count toward each child’s $2,000 resource limit. If you want to give me more information about the vehicles, I may be able to provide more information. Specifically, how many vehicles would you and their father have? Is their father’s used to carry tools and materials to work site that could not be carried in your car? What is the value of his vehicle(s) and how much, if any, is owed on each?

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • toya james

    My 7 years old receives benefits ssi. When he first started receiving benefits I had a full time job making 14.00 now I have a part time making a 11.00 my son receives 733. Will my income increase his ssi payments?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Toya,

      Your decrease in income will not increase your son’s benefits because he is already receiving the maximum. You do need to continue reporting your earnings monthly.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • ashley

    HI MY DAUGHTER RECIEVES SSI OF $796 in California I just got a job that is seasonal I’m making about 1600 this month I am a one parent and one ineligible child household will they lower her income

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ashly,

      If your gross wages are $1,600 and neither child has income, your daughter’s SSI will not be reduced.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • If my child gets Ssi and is autistic and I’m going to be starting a job paying 22.70 an hour but I have 3 kids total a 17 year old enrolled in a Junior college , a 10 year old with ADHD that has been diagnosed but I never tried to get benefit for, and the one who is autistic. Will they reduce her benefits alot and what should I do.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ms. Parks,

      If you are the only parent in the household, the income from you new job will make your child ineligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) according to the deeming chart on Social Security’s website (https://www.socialsecurity.gov/ssi/text-child-ussi.htm). My opinion on what you should do is to take the job and, if needed, apply for health insurance for your whole family under the Affordable Care Act or for your children through the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). More information is available at http://www.healthcare.gov. And, of course, report your new income to Social Security by the 10th of the month following receipt of your first paycheck.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Tiffany

    Hi. My child should be deemed eligible for SSI due to severe autism. I receive $1731 in a pension from previous spouse’s death and my current spouse receives $185 a month in back child support for a seperate non eligible child. We have no earned income. What will my eligible child receive in SSI?
    Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tiffany,

      If your family resources (assets) are within the SSI limits and your family is paying for all its own housing and food, your child will be eligible for SSI because your family’s income is within the limits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Andrea

    My son was just approved for SSI benefits. Our application interview was back in August. How many months of back payments are to be expected? I have heard 3 and I have heard 4. Also at what amount will it have to be put in a trustee account?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Andrea,

      If you started the application in August and it was not August 1, SSI benefits will begin to accrue for September. The number of back pay months will depend on when payment is process and the first monthly benefit is paid. If January is the first monthly benefit, there will be four months. A dedicated account is required when back pay for a disable child exceeds six months.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Carrie P

    Ok so my sons mother just passed away and he will be living with me soon! He draws a disability check for his adhd, I gross roughly around 2300 per month, sometimes more depending on overtime and holidays! When he moves in with me, will he still receive his full amount or will it be cut?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Carrie,

      Your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will be reduced because of your work earnings. In addition to applying to be payee for your son, you should also apply for survivor benefits to find out whether any Social Security survivor benefits are payable for your son on his mother’s earnings record.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Derek

    My daughter currently receives SSI and lives with her mother and I (unmarried), and one ineligible child. We have one vehicle valued at $3000 . My employer wants me to work four hours a week for 2 years in exhange for a $6000 car, but she wants to give me the title now.

    A) Will there be any problem with her signing the car over to me?

    B) Am I right in thinking that the $6k car will be excluded and the $3k car will take up parents allowed resources. Leaving basically whatever money in the bank as counting towards my daughter’s $2k resource limit.

    Basically the way I understand it is, With two parents there is a $3k limit and then it begins to count as daughter’s resource and she has a $2k limit. So in total our family can have right at $5k in resources and our daughter is still eligible for SSI.

    Last question: Would value of resources affect SSI benefit ammount? Or is that just income?

    Thanks, you’ll be a lifesaver if you can set me straight on this!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Derek,

      You have correctly analyzed the effect of the two vehicles on your daughter’s SSI resource limit if the title goes in your name with no lien holder on it. If your boss keeps a lien on it and loan papers are drawn up, then only your equity in the car will be the car’s value. Accordingly, the $3,000 car would be excluded and the equity value of the $6,000 car would count.

      If assets are below the limits, they do not affect payment amount. Sometimes gift of an asset is income in the month it is received. In the situation you are describing, receipt of the car would not count as income because one of the two situations would apply. 1) If there are loan papers drawn up, the acquisition of the car will not count as income because you are buying it. If the car is transferred to you with no lien, it will be the excluded vehicle because it has the higher value of the two, so its receipt will not count as income in the month it was received.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Angie

    My son turned 18 recently. I am applying for SSI benefits for him. They are asking if he received child support. If I still receive child support for him from his father because our decree orders him to pay after my son turned 18 due to his disability, would i need to include that child support amount in my som’s application. To restate my question, would child support that I’m receiving for my adult son reduce my adult son’s SSI benefits?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Angie,

      Yes, I believe that the child support will reduce the SSI because it is income for your child’s support and SSI (Supplemental Security Income) is intended, as its name says, to supplement other income. Failure to declare the income would be fraud.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Chris

    We live in Alabama and have a child that is diagnosed with autism. Our mortgage payment is 995 per month. We have two inelgible children besides our autistic son. I work a commission job and my average bring home pay after insurance is 3400 per month for the months from May until September. How much should my son receive in SSI. My wife and I are married and she does not work. We have two vehicles. Neither is newer than a 2006. His ABA therapy is $110 per visit and we desperately need the help for those payments because we would like to take him twice per week. Any help you could provide would be greatly appreciated.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Chris,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments are calculated month by month, so your child might be eligible for SSI benefits (and Medicaid) in some months and not others. I can’t tell whether he would be eligible in the months you have work income because gross earnings are counted. The limit of earned income for your household composition is $4,525 gross earnings. If you draw unemployment in the months you don’t work, the limit for all unearned (non-work) income is $2,607. Monthly benefits can range from $1 to $733. Usually Medicaid coverage accompanies SSI eligibility and would continue even when only one dollar is payable.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Christine

      Hello
      I’m trying to figure this out. My daughter just got accepted for ssi payments. I make 800 a month but I am on section 8 and my rent is 95 a month. How much will my daughters ssi payment be?

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Christine,

        If your $800 income is work earnings, your daughter’s SSI will be $733.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  • Tabitha

    I’m trying to understand how the resource guidelines work for automobiles. I know that they exclude the 1st vehicle regardless of value, but the 2nd is counted. My kids dad and I both work and use both vehicles for transportation (our shifts don’t work out for only 1 vehicle). We have 3 children together, 2 have autism (we are applying for SSI for both at the same time) and 1 that will be ineligible. I believe we will qualify right now with the vehicles we own because one is only worth $1300 and the other about $950, but my question is that we were considering replacing the vehicles with our tax refund in February. Does this mean I won’t be able to purchase a vehicle with a value of over $2000 (or is it $3000 because we are a couple)? HELP! 🙂

    • Tabitha

      Also, what value do they use for vehicles and how is it calculated?

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Tabitha,

        Please see my reply of a moment ago. The value is the equity, that is, the value of the car reduced by what you owe on it.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tabitha,

      The more valuable vehicle is always excluded, so if you keep the one worth $1,300, then $1,300 will count toward your $3,000 resource limit (the two-parent limit) and will be added to bank accounts and other assets you may have when totaling your assets. If you have more than $3,000, the excess will be split between the two disabled children (if both are approved) and counted toward each child’s $2,000 limit. Also, as an aside, you may be able to get both vehicles excluded regardless of value based on their being income-producing property (needed to get to work). Finally, in order not to have three cars’ value counted on the first of any month, be sure to sell one of the cars in the same month you buy the newer one.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Thrash

    Hello my 3 year old son just got approved for ssi. Myself and his mother both receives ssi benefits so i would like to know if our son will get full benefits with both parents living in rental apt. And also can the mother have a car note

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Thrash,

      Please see my reply to your prior posting. Buying a car will not affect SSI eligibility for your son or his mother.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Thrash

    If my son just got approved for ssi and myself and his mother receives ssi living in same house hold will he get full benefits

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Thrash,

      Your son’s SSI payment amount will not be affected by you and his mother receiving SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • TammiF

    My son qualifies for ssi, I just need to apply but wanted to make sure we’re even eligible. It’s difficult to calculate, can you help me. I have 1 other ineligible child. I’m on ssdi $930 (after my $105 medicare ins) plus each child receives $229 due to my ssdi. So the total ssdi income is $1388. Husbands work is seasonal but when I calculate average monthly is $2750. So the total coming in each month is approx. $4138. I get mixed up when it comes to whether my or my kids ssdi checks are considered in the calculation. Can you give me an idea if we qualify. If I did it right, it looks like we make about $249/month too much to qualify?

    Thank you so much, you are awesome for helping so many people work thru this process.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tammy,

      Your gross Social Security does count as income. Your ineligible children’s social security reduces the amount of your and your husband’s income that will be allotted for their support. Your disabled child’s Social Security will count as his own income. Your husband’s wages will not be averaged. His gross wages will be counted in the exact amount he receives each month so your son might be eligible some months but not others.

      Take your husband’s lowest gross earnings and your gross Social Security, $1,035, and your children’s income and use the formula in this article where you posted your question to calculate whether your son might be eligible in low-wage months. If you are not sure, apply for SSI for him in the low season when your husband’s wages are likely to be the lowest.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • penny

    Hi,
    I’m working with a family of 5 with a handicapped child, they were turned down for SSI because they make too much money. The husband works making 20.50 per hour and they pay 1,000 or more each month for their health insurance from his work(if there are 3 paydays in a month then 1,500). They are over the limit too for CHIP/Kidcare. What is the income limit for a family of 5 and applying for SSI.
    Penny

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Penny,

      The earned income limit for two parents and two non-disabled children is $,525. Therefore, I would expect the disabled child to be financially eligible based on family income in the months the father gets only two paychecks unless the non-disabled children have income or the family’s countable resources (assets) exceed the limit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • kesha

    My 6 yr old son currently receives disability because he has adhd and mixed/expressive language delay. My 3 yr has recently been diagnosed with the same disorders. If my 3yr old is approved for disability, will my older son’s benefits be cut. He currently receives $733 we live in Tennessee and don’t receive any state payments.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kesha,

      Your six-year-old’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will not be reduced if your three-year-old is also approved for SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jennifer

    Hi,
    Does my 401k that I have count for deeming my son’s SSI? I make $2300 a month and have $2,721 in my 401k. There are 2 other children living in the household. No other resources as we rent a house and only 1 vehicle . Will my 401k exceed the limits for my son?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jennifer,

      If you are under age fifty-nine and a half, your 401k will not count toward your resource limit because you cannot not withdraw from it without a large tax penalty.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Janell

    I can’t get the hang of the income. I have two children. One that Would be eligible for benefits(she has no income). The other child gets $53.00 a month from ss off of his dad’s disability. The household only consist of my 2 children and my self. My income for last year was 33,253. And should be close to the same for this year. Will my child be eligible for benefits?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Janell,

      One or both of your children should be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits if they are disabled.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • stephanie hurley

    I had a question my disabled son is on ssi he gets 733.00 a month I have two other children who are ineligible one of them gets 100.00 in child support but the other gets nothing so I am working with the HCB Waiver and getting income from that of about 1700 before taxes will my son’s ssi be reduced any

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Stephanie,

      Unless the income you receive under HCB waiver is excluded by federal statute from counting as income for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), it likely will be treated as earnings. However, with two ineligible children and the work-incentive exclusions, the income is likely to have little or no effect on your disabled child’s SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Kimberly

    Hi Kay,

    I have a question. I just became employed, how will my income affect my son’s SSI? I will be earning under $2000 a month. Is there a calculation for this? Do I still need to report it to the Social Security office?

    I’m a tad confused on what I should do. I obviously want to do what I’m supposed to.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kimberly,

      You should report your income as soon as you receive all your pay checks for the month of June if you are paid in June or for the month of July if your first pay will be in July. Your son’s eligibility and, if eligible, payment amount depends on whether you or he has other income, whether there are other children in the household, and on whether you are married. You can use the formula in the examples in the article “What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect an SSI Application for Children?” under the SSI tab on this website.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Yvette

    I have a 8 yro child with down syndrome. I will retire soon where my income will be 2969 monthly. His dad is required to pay $305 child support, but only does so when and if he works. I am a little confused about the computation of deeming parent to child for SSI. Aslo confused about the earned/unearned income clarification. The more I read the more confusing I get. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Yvette,

      Unless you have five other minor children in the household, your child is not eligible for Supplemental Security Income. If the $2,969 retirement income is Social Security, your child will be eligible for dependent benefits on your earnings record. If it is from another source, when you apply for Social Security in the future, you can apply for your child at the same time.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Linda

    My 2.5 year old has nonverbal moderate autism. He has been approved and now we are to turn in income. My husband is in the military. He’s military and the only household income. His total income is $53527. That includes bas, bah, and wages. His taxable income is $30972. I know his bah ($1512 monthly) is considered in-kind if we live in base housing, which we do. How does that work? Would it bring us in the eligibility limit? We are a family of 4.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Linda,

      I do not know what bah is. I suggest that you use the formula in the article “What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect an SSI Application for Children?”, which can be found under the SSI tab on this website. For the in-kind income use $244 as your son’s income. Do not include in-kind income for you or your husband. If you work up an estimate that is close to qualifying, be sure to file a claim to get a formal income determination.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Laron

    Oh yeah by the way I live in california

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Laron,

      California pays an SSI state supplement, which I estimate will be $51. This is in addition to the previous federal benefit estimate I gave of $184.00.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Laron

    I receive 942 for social security disability.My son receives 370 off of my social security record.How will deeming work for my situation and about how much will his ssi check be if I apply for benefits for his diasbility.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Laron,

      Please see my prior response of a few minutes ago.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Laroch

    Can you tell me what my son’s monthly payments would be.I receive 942 and social security disability benefits.My son receives 360 off of my social security record.However I am applying for ssi disability benefits for his disability. No other income or anyone leaving in the home with me.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Laroch,

      If your gross Social Security before any withholding or Medicare premiums is $942, I estimate that your child will be eligible for $184 monthly if approved.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Ashley

    Hi Kay, Thank you for your previous response. I have reviewed the article as you advised but am confused. It says that a single parent can have $2,000 in countable resources, does that mean gross monthly income or do they count after taxes? Im just trying to figure out the numbers but Im not sure what the $2,000 limit in countable resources actually includes. After this is clarified i can then use the formula of income – $65 – $20 / half = X – FBR = Monthly payments.

    Thank you !
    Ashley

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ashley,

      You are confusing resources with income. Income is money that comes in during the month (gross wages, pensions, etc.). Resources are what you own on the first of the following month including income from the prior month that was not spent.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jennifer

    Hello,

    I was hoping you could answer a question for me, I have searched and searched but to no avail I an’t find the answer. I am going to apply for SSI for my 2 sons. One is legally blind so I know he will qualify, the other has a vision of 20/100 but other problems with vision so I am not sure if he will. I also have a 3rd son who is not disabled. I am living with my boyfriend, we are not married and he is not the father of any of my children. We are both on the lease but all bills are in his name. We share half the bills and rent. I provide everything for my children including their food. Will his income be counted? I make $2120 monthly before taxes so I’m not sure if my son’s will qualify if they use his income too. I also receive no assistance or child support if that makes a difference. Thank you in advance for any information you can give. This is an overwhelming journey and I just started! This site has been a life saver and the only thing that has kept me sane while researching. I want to thank you for spending time and effort on us clueless people and helping guide us thru this. Thank You so very much!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jennifer,

      Your boyfriend’s income will not be counted in determining your children’s financial eligibility for Supplemental Security Income. With five people in the house and your paying one half of everything, your children and you are being subsidized by your boyfriend. To pay your share, your family’s share, you would have to pay 80% of the expense shelter and food. (Note: If you are paying half of cable and phones and household supplies, you might consider letting him pay all those and you pay more of the rent, shelter utilities, and food.)

      You can use the formula in the examples in article “What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect an SSI Application for Children?”to calculate the amount of your income that will deemed available for the support of your disabled children. (The article is located under the SSI tab at the top of this page.) If both children are approved, the amount will be split in half with half of the deemed income reducing each child’s benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Jennifer

        Thank you so much for the info Kay! I just have a follow up question. How can I prove to the Social Security office that I pay my share of the bills? What proof will they ask for? Can I show them my bank transactions that say I pay the bills with my card? I’m all new to this so I am clueless.

        • Jennifer

          I also would like to add, if I should keep the grocery receipts when I buy the food? I’m not sure what all records the Social Security office will ask for.

          • Kay Derochie

            Dear Jennifer,

            Please see my prior reply. You could save the food receipts to show the total amount of the food cost for the whole household, although it may not be required.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Jennifer,

          You will need to present the household’s utility bills and your lease. If you have a bank record that shows what you pay directly to the landlord and utility companies that would be one kind of proof. You might also take a statement from your boyfriend regarding how much he pays and how much you pay on these specific items. If you share food, both of you can make a written statement as to costs and who pays them.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • angela

    I have two children and one is on the Autism spectrum severely. I will receive 1,200.00 a month for child support and that is it. WILL the amount of food stamps I get affect the amount of SSI I could qualify for? I live in North Carolina if that makes a difference

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Angela,

      The family’s food stamps will not affect your child’s financial eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • satin

    Hi, my son who is 16 months(13 months corrected) is disabled. He doesn’t walk or crawl yet. He has hypertonia of his legs. MRI came back normal. Do we qualify? We are a family of 4. My husband is the only one working. This year gross tax was approximately$ 53,000. Oh and we live in nj. I don’t know if that helps. Thanks

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Satin,

      Your husband’s work earnings are about $300 above the SSI monthly earned income limit for a family with two parents and one non-disabled child.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Trish

    My daughter wants to apply for SSI for her six year old disabled son. My daughter is employed, but doesn’t make a lot and they both live with me in my house. Does the SSA consider MY income for deeming purposes or only my daughters?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Trish,

      Your income and assets will not be deemed to your grandchild and will not affect his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) application. If your daughter does not pay her son’s share of shelter expenses (rent or mortgage and property taxes, heat, power, water/sewer and garbage) and of food (if they share food with you), your grandson is receiving in-kind (non-cash) income from you that will reduce his SSI payment.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Trish

        Thank you very much for responding so quickly, I greatly appreciate it.

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Trish.

  • Katy

    I have a daughter and a son. My son recueves Ssi I also receive. My daughter does not. Their father left me and I would like to go for child support but I want to know if it would affect my sons Ssi check? I was told that it shouldn’t affect it because he gets Ssi for being disabled and the child support is to support him. I’m very confused. Pls help. I live in Pennsylvania.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Katy,

      Your son’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will be reduced by all but $20 of his child support. For example, if your son now gets $733 and he got $500 child support, his SSI would be reduced to $253 and his total income would be $20 more than his current SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sinc

  • Erica

    Hello. My 2 year old son was approved after 6 months for disability. I make 2300 a month plus 600 in child support. I haven’t heard back yet from ss but today received a $14 check. Is that the amount I will get monthly?

    I miss so much work for doctor appointments and now need to at outpatient speech and occupational therapy for my son. And need to cut back on my hours at work.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Eric,

      The maximum federal SSI payment is $733. Your son’s child support reduces his benefit to $153.00. Presumably the remainder of the reduction is due to your work earnings.

      As your work earnings fluctuate, so will your son’s SSI benefit. As long as he remains eligible, your earnings in one month will be used to calculate his benefits two months later (March earnings determine May benefits.) You need to report your actual earnings at the end of each month. If you have not been set up for telephone reporting, ask Social Security to get you set up. If you formally reduce your hours, you can report that so that the ongoing estimate is lowered.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • rosanna york

    Besides the allocations stated above are there allocations for mortgage payments and utilities?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Rosanna,

      Allocations are only for the people that the parents’ income supports. The presumption is that the mortgage and utilities are paid out of the allocated money that is excluded from deeming to the disabled child.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Alicia

    I have a son on ssi and he recieves full amount. I applied for ssi for my other son. I dont have any income at all. What will my second son recieve? Do they deem what my first son gets?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Alicia,

      Deeming does not apply between siblings. Each son’s benefit will be calculated separately.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • leah

    Hi!

    My husband just accepted a position that puts our family monthly income at about 4300. We have one disabled child and one non-disabled child. Our rent is 850/mo, we have a small amount in savings.

    The current max parental income limit appears to be 4096. Are we screwed? Or can there possibly be additional adjustments? I don’t care about the payments….we depend on the medicaid.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Leah,

      The allocations have gone up a little bit so that the earnings threshold is a bit higher in 2015, but it appears that your family income is still too high for SSI eligibility and Medicaid based on SSI eligibility. If your husband pays child support to a child outside the household, there would be a further adjustment. Other than that, I can’t think of anything else to adjust the amounts.

      Regarding health insurance, perhaps your husband’s new job offers insurance. If not, try applying for insurance through your local state or county social services office. There are different levels of Medicaid coverage in different states so that might be a possibility. Several states have special insurance programs for children, such as Children’s Health Care Program (CHIP). You can also apply for your child through the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). You have sixty days from the termination of the Medicaid without having to wait for an open enrollment period at the end of the year. You can get more information at http://www.healthcare.gov.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Meryl

    Hello-
    I have 2 separate situations :

    My adult child receives $480 in SSI and also gets food stamps of $157. We had to move from paying $1300 rent to having an extra bedroom and more room so he can live with us. Our rent right now is $2100. I wanted to know if I should charge him rent and how do I go about doing that to be able to report it? Would his SSI go up? Also the SSI is under my name not his, since he is unable to to do his financials due to traumatic brain injury.

    Other situation is, I got married 2 years ago. I have a stepson who is in the autism spectrum and receives disability. The disability goes to his mom. I don’t know how much he receives. We also pay child support of $655. We also have him 14 nights and 4 days out of the month.
    I wanted to know if we can reduce the support since our income is 60k a year and if it would affect his SSI?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Meryl,

      You can charge your son rent for the room. If you charge market value for the room (check Craig’s list or other rental sources in the area to see how much rooms with kitchen privileges go for) and he continues to receive food stamps because his food is purchased separately from yours and you do not share food, he can receive an increase to the maximum SSI, which is $733. The increase will occur two months later. If he can’t pay market rate, but can pay some amount over $244, report the rent to get a partial increase. (The difference between market value and what he pays will be in-kind income.) When he gets an increase, raise the rent, and keep doing that until he gets as close as he can to the maximum.

      You need to consult with a family law attorney for your question about child support. I’m not sure I understand all the relationships regarding the stepchild, but if you are paying child support for the stepchild, a reduction in child support could cause the child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to go up. If instead the disabled stepchild is in your household, reducing child support paid to a child outside the household could cause the stepchild’s SSI to go down or stop.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Meryl

        Thank you! Have a blessed day. 🙂

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Meryl.

  • My son gets SSI and I received the information about his back pay and the figures. However I do not see where they calculation for my other child that lives with me. Also I was wondering in Child Support is a source of unearned income on my disabled child. Can you please give me an example of how to figure payment with 1 Child Allocation that received $400 a month in child support with my income at 2600.00 per month and the disabled child receiving $400.00 child support.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Regina,

      The child support that your disabled child receives is countable income and reduces your child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI). The child support that your other child receives is more than the support allowance for an ineligible child; therefore, there is no allocation of your income for the support of your non-disabled child. You can calculate your child’s benefit by using the sample calculation in the article “What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect an SSI Application for Children?” under the SSI tab found at the top of each page on this website.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Riley

    Hello, I receive SSDI, and my 4 year old receives SSI. My wife works and draws nothing. We have had vehicle issues and will need to get another vehicle.
    My question is, will our resource limit affect our Childs SSI or my SSDI should we go over the $3,000 resource limit to purchase another vehicle? We reside in Arkansas if that might matter.
    Thank you.
    Riley

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Riley,

      Your question about resources applies to Supplemental Security Income (SSI) paid to disabled children. (If your child is not disabled, then he or she is receiving Social Security dependent benefits, not SSI.) Your assets have no affect on your Social Security Disability (SSDI) or on Social Security dependent benefits.

      The SSI resource limit is $3,000 for you and your wife and $2,000 for your child. So, if you and your wife have $4,000 in resources, for example, $1,000 would be deemed to be your child’s resource. Looking at multiple vehicles, your equity in the vehicle is its value. Equity is the value of the car less the amount owed on it. The more valuable of the two cars will be excluded and the less valuable will be counted unless an exception applies. If one vehicle is needed for self-support (to get your wife to work) and the other for medical and there is no way to use one to meet both needs, you might be able to get one car excluded as property needed for self-support.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Smarcano

    My son turned 18 in July and I was asked to send my income and my husband’s income to calculate his benefits. When I called the SSi office the person i spoked with did not know why they are asking for my income, so she trasferred the call to my case manager I left numerous messages and she haven’t return my calls. Does anyone knows why is my income counted?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Smarcano,

      If your child was receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) before he turned eighteen, it is possible that the information was requested to do a final calculation of benefits to determine that he was correctly paid up to his eighteenth birthday before starting SSI payments for him as an adult. If that is not the case, it would appear an error was made. Your income will not affect your adult son’s SSI benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jman1919

    Are a parents resources and income counted against an adult child that is living with their parents? Or is the child just required to pay say 1/4 of the expenses in the house if their are 4 people living there? Do the parents still have to turn in their financial information each month just like when the child was a minor?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jman,

      Parents’ income and resources do not affect an adult child’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. The parents do not have to provide any financial information other than proof of shelter expenses, which is needed as proof that the adult child is paying his or her share of expenses. (If you have a minor child receiving SSI, you need to apply for adult SSI benefits for the child three months before his or her eighteenth birthday.)

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • George

        Follow-up question to this please: If the adult child does not pay FMV for room and board and does not pay his or her fair share of the household expenses, will SSI benefits be only reduced, or eliminated?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear George,

          The most benefits will be reduced for in-kind support and maintenance is by one-third to $488. If the adult child has other countable income, the benefit will be reduced further.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

Read It To Me
Listen to the article with our text to speech feature
Ask the Adivsor
Click for the BBB Business Review of this Online Publications in Orlando FL

Send this to a friend