SSI Benefit for Two Children with Autism

By / December 27, 2016 / SSI / 20 Comments

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Hi Disability Advisor:

Our oldest son is receiving SSI due to Autism and we recently received a second diagnosis of the disorder for our second child. We have just applied for SSI for him and are awaiting their decision.  Assuming he gets qualified I have a couple of questions. First, we are currently receiving around $106 per month for child #1.  Using the formula that SSA provides us each month on how they determine his amount I came up with a ballpark figure for two children of $670 ($335 each).  Does this sound possible?  I make $3945 per month gross.  This is earned income and the only income for our family which consists of me, my wife and our two kids.  It’s been really difficult finding info online for figuring amounts for two disabled children. Second, does the monthly income limit increase with a second disabled child?  Right now I think our limit is $4158 since we have one child considered an “ineligible” child by not being qualified yet. Lastly, I’m trying to understand the asset limits for having a child/children receiving SSI.  I’ve read where an individual can’t have more than $2,000 in assets to qualify.  Does this mean our child/children can each have $2,000 in asssets and we as parents can also have $2,000 in assets and still qualify?  Or does our entire household need to have $2,000 or less to qualify. I apologize for giving you so much to ponder.  We really do appreciate your time and your expertise in helping to educate us on this resource.

Thank you,
Chris in St. Joseph, MI

Dear Chris,

The calculation of how much parental income is deemed (considered) available for the support of disabled children is the same whether you have one or more disabled children. The only difference is that with multiple disabled children, the deemed amount is split among the children.

In the case of your family, I calculate the same figure as you, $333 for each of your two children ($335 each in 2017). The calculation follows the formula given you by the Social Security Administration, which also appears with an example in our article “What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect an SSI Application for Children?” You can find the article under the SSI tab at the top of this webpage. The formula makes provisions for parents supporting themselves and their non-disabled children and gives a work incentive by not counting part of the earned income.

With regard to resource rules, two parents living in the same household with one or more disabled children can have $3,000 in countable assets and each disabled child can have $2,000. If you and your wife have more than $3,000, the excess will be divided between your two disabled children and counted toward their individual $2,000 limits. Note that several assets are not countable including but not limited to a home you live in, one vehicle, resources necessary for self-support (i.e. property used to produce income) and certain kinds of burial policies. A list of some excluded resources can be found in the article “When I Am Applying for SSI Disability, Which of My Assets Are Counted Against the SSI Resource Limit?” This article can also be found under the SSI tab at the top of this page.

Sincerely,

Kay

SSI Benefit for Two Children with Autism
3.67 (73.33%) 3 votes

  • Dear Stressed Mom,

    You can start a Childhood Disability Benefits (CDB) claim for your son now to have his Social Security dependent benefits continued as CDB benefits, which are paid to unmarried disabled adult children. If his current benefit is less than $755, in July you can file an SSI application for him as well for benefits to start after he turns eighteen.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Aimee,

    If your family has resources (assets) within the limits and your children have no income, your child will be eligible for about $672. The resource limit is $3,000 for you and your husband and $2,000 for your disabled child. If your child has not assets, you and your husband can have $5,000 of which $2,000 will count as your son’s. The car with the lower equity value will count toward the limit. (Equity is the retail value minus the amount owed on the vehicle.)

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Yvette Varela

    I have a question, both my husband and i receive ssdi benefits. We have 2 children under the age of 18 with autism… and 1 18 yr old with a mental health condition. The 2 kids receive benefits from our ssdi. Due they qualify for ssi??? Does the 18 yr old who is unable to work?

    Also if ihhs pays me, will i lose my ssdi benefits? Or is it considered exempt income?

    • Dear Yvette,

      As long as your earnings from IHHS remain below $1,170 gross, it is unlikely that the work earnings will affect your SSDI benefits. Whether or not your two children qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) depends on the amount of Social security they receive from your account and any other income they have. Plus, it is possible that some of your income will be deemed available for the support of your minor child and if the older child is getting free housing and food from you, part of that will count as is income.

      You can file an application for each child to determine financial eligibility. If they are financially eligible, a medical review will follow to determine whether or not they are disabled as defined by Social Security law.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Dear Jennifer,

    I do not have enough information to figure out how much SSI might be payable. If you would like to provide more information, I will try to respond.
    1. Who is eligible for SSI? You or one of your children?
    2. List all the income the family has and whose income it is.
    3. How many children do you have under age eighteen.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Marilyn,

    I would recommend appealing with the assistance of an experienced Social Security attorney who knows how to present an appeal to the Appeals Council.

    When you hire a Social Security attorney, you do not have to pay any legal fees up front and you will pay attorney fees only if you are approved for benefits. Social Security law sets the amount the attorney can charge and the Social Security Administration pays the attorney directly from your back pay.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

    • Marilyn Miller

      Thank you

  • Dear Kristin,

    No marriage will not reduce the benefit because your boyfriend is your child’s father and his income is already being considered in determining your child’s benefit amount.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Kristin,

    Your child will be eligible for $735. It is important to note that your disabled child’s father’s income will be reduced by an allotment for his one non-disabled child and not for the support of your two other children because you are not married and he is not a stepparent to your children.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Michele,
    There is no prohibition in SSI law that I know of against listing your child’s income as part of your household income. Whether or not you are allowed to list it will depend on the policies of the lender.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Kristen,

    If your disabled child is not your boyfriend’s child, your boyfriend’s income and resources (assets) are not counted in determining your child’s SSI benefits. However, if your boyfriend pays more than his share of shelter expenses (and food if you share food), your child is receiving in-kind (non-cash) support and maintenance from him, which counts as income. Your boyfriend’s share is the total shelter expenses and food expenses if you share food divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax, and if required by the lender property insurance.

    If the child support is for all four children, your disabled child’s portion is $212.25. Of that, two-thirds or $141.57 is countable income. His SSI benefit will be calculated as follows: ($735-141.57) – (any in-kindsupport he is getting from your boyfriend).

    You must not co-mingle your boyfriend’s money with yours or with your son’s money. You can have $2,000 total resources regardless of what they are or where money is stored. Your car is not a countable resource. If you have more than $2,000 is assets, the excess counts toward your son’s $2,000 resource limit.

    Finally, if your boyfriend gives you any cash that is income you have to report. If you have income of more than $735 a month, the excess will count to reduce your son’s benefits.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • You are welcome, Mrs. B.

  • Dear Lisa,

    As you describe the situation, your daughter may meet the criteria for childhood disability.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Danielle,

    I suggest getting written documentation of the restrictions on the access to the Thrift Account, then report the account to Social Security with the proof that you cannot access it except under those restricted circumstances, which I assume don’t apply to you. (You don’t need to have negative cash flow for your child to qualify financially for SSI).

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Angela,

    I’m uncertain whether you meant to ask a question. If so and you want to post it, I will attempt to answer.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Daniel,

    You can appeal the effective date of your children’s benefits as you describe on the basis that you did not receive the notification; however, if you did not keep Social Security apprised of your address changes and/or set up postal forwarding orders, you might not be successful with the appeal because you would have been responsible for not receiving the mail.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Mrs. B.,

    I estimate that your child, if medically approved, will receive about $392.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Autism Mom,

    Unless the payment of rent and utilities by your four-year old’s father is considered child support, her benefit will be about $497 because she is receiving free shelter paid for by someone outside the household and one fourth of that value is charged to her. You can apply for the two-year-old at any time you think you have enough information about is medical condition. Your five-year old’s income change will not affect the SSI calculation at the present time because you have no income yourself.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Ronald,

    Were you approved for Social Security Disability, Supplemental Security Income, or both. Once I know the kind of benefits, I can respond.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

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