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What is Supplemental Security Income Disability—also known as SSI—and how is it different from Social Security Disability Insurance, known as SSDI or SSD?

By   /  March 3, 2016  /  686 Comments

See how Supplemental Security Income, aka SSI, differs from Social Security, how to get both SSDI and SSI, and how to apply for SSI disability.

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Watch the Video: "What are Supplemental Security Income Disability Payments?"

The Difference Between SSI and SSDI

Supplemental Security Income, SSI for short, is a Federal needs-based assistance program for people who are either disabled or over age sixty-five. The Social Security Administration administers both Social Security and SSI Disability, but some of the requirements for SSI eligibility are different from those for Social Security.

SSDI requires a certain number of work credits and payment of Social Security taxes. In most cases the SSI program does not require work credits. Only noncitizens in a certain immigration status must have work credits to get SSI. The SSI program, unlike SSDI, requires family assets and income to fall below a certain limit. It also considers living arrangements, including whether or not you are living in an institution, in determining eligibility and payment amount.

Another way that SSI is different from Social Security is that disabled children under age eighteen can receive SSI disability payments if their income and the assets and income of parents with whom they live are below the prescribed limit.

Yet another difference is that if you are approved for Social Security Disability for more than twenty-four months, you will be eligible for Medicare. SSI does not provide access to Medicare; but if you are approved for SSI, in most states you will be eligible for Medicaid in the first month of SSI eligibility.

SSI Definitions of Disability for Adults and Children

The definition of disability for adults who apply for SSI is the same as for Social Security disability. Our article “What Is Disability According to Social Security Disability Law?” explains the definition. The requirements for a disabled child under age eighteen are somewhat different. Social Security will determine a child is disabled if he or she “has a medically determinable physical or mental impairment or combination of impairments that causes marked and severe functional limitations and that can be expected to cause death or that has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than twelve months.”

Determining Eligibility for SSI

Because there are many factors involved in assessing financial eligibility for SSI, the most reliable way to find out whether you or your child is financially eligible for SSI disability payments is to contact the Social Security Administration or a Social Security Disability lawyer to file an SSI application. For more information about SSI, see our articles “What Requirements Do I Have to Meet for SSI Disability Eligibility?” and “When I Apply for SSI Disability, Why Does Social Security Require Me to Apply for Other Benefits?”

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  • Published: 7 months ago on March 3, 2016
  • By:
  • Last Modified: March 4, 2016 @ 4:26 pm
  • Filed Under: SSI

686 Comments

  1. Bette says:

    Good Morning. I was wondering if you could give me a little direction please. My daughter was diagnosed with Epilepsy at age 15 we did not apply for any benefits because we felt we could manage. Now she is 20 and her Epilepsy has gotten progressively worse. Her job has cut her hours down from 25-30 a week to 2 per week and of coarse she is older and now the inability to drive is affecting her and her employment. I have read at the ss site benefits are based on years worked if not a minor but what does or can a young adult who has not had the opportunity to earn these credits do. Will they look at my income and credits I have paid in? She is disabled and it could take months, years or never to find an acceptable medication to control her seizures. Any responses would be helpful. Thank you in advance

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Bette,

      Your daughter can apply for disability benefits while she is still working because her earnings are minimal. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits do not require work credits. Because she is an adult, your income and assets will not affect her SSI claim. Because she is quite young, she may have enough work credits (6) for a very small Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefit. She can apply for that at the same time as she applies for SSI.

      If she does meet the definition of disability and continues to be disabled and unmarried, she can apply for childhood disability benefits (CDB) on one or both of her parents’ earnings record when her parent(s) receive Social Security benefits or die.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  2. Tina says:

    Hi I have a question. My son moved back home and he is disabled and getting ssi we had to fill out paper work for his food assistance and they want to know if I will be claiming him on my tax return next year this is the first time they have asked this question. Why do they need to know this information?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tina,

      I am not sufficiently knowledgeable about the administration of the SNAP program to answer your question. I suggest that you ask the SNAP office.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  3. Tony says:

    Hello Kay,
    I tried to post my comment yesterday but I don’t see it on here. So I apologize if you receive this comment twice.
    The Social Security Administration approved my SSI Disability application but they calculated my back pay at $488.67 per month instead of $733 per month. When I asked my SSA representative about it, she claimed that SSA always assumes that when you are unemployed and you do not have any assets while awaiting the SSI disability determination, they assume that someone would be paying for your food and shelter so they automatically take out $244.33 for your monthly benefits as if someone paid for your shelter and food. She said this is pretty much always the case that they make this finding/ assumption for SSI back pay. Is this true or am I missing something. My daughter was helping me to pay for my food and shelter but this was done out of necessity because I had no other means to pay for them. I want to repay her for her help because it was agreed that once I get my SSI benefits, I would pay her for past rent. What can I do for SSA to increase my back pay benefits to $733 per month? Can I just talk to the representative and submit proof or would this require an appeal to an administrative judge. My current SSI benefits starting May 2016 is $733 but all the back pay is at $488.67 per month. I received some of the back pay already but am waiting for the second installment of it.
    Thank you so much for your help. I really appreciate your response.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Tony,

      Your post and my reply are under the article “Supplemental Security Income–SSI–the Other Disability Benefit”under the SSI tab at the top of the webpage.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  4. Chikma says:

    Hi.. I’m receiving supplemental benefits for my 12 year old son. I’m no longer working due to me having mental illness and also waiting on disability approval. Will I lose my sons benefits because I’m no longer working Kay?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Chikma,

      Your child will not lose benefits because you are not working. However, you do need to report your cease work date and the start date of any other income such as unemployment compensation, short-term disability benefits, or private financial help. That income will be considered in determining whether your son is still eligible for benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  5. Bill says:

    Hello,

    I am divorced and my son is living with his mother. He has been diagnosed with autism since he was 2 years old. Now he is 30 years old, not married, not working and already collecting SSI.
    I receive SSDI due to a stroke I had this past January. Can my son be also eligible for SSDI Benefits?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Bill,

      Yes, your former wife can apply for Childhood Disability Benefits (CDB) for your son on your earnings record. If your work history is sufficient, dependent benefits will be payable. His SSI will be reduced or terminated depending on the amount of the CDB benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  6. Sammy says:

    Hello,

    My daughter is 20yrs old, she has a learning disability and lives with her mother in another state, she is concerned that her mother has been receiving SSI for her disability and withholding this information from her, what should she do? and what can I do on my end to assist her as she does need help do to her disability.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sammy,

      Your adult daughter can go to or call Social Security at 800-772-1213 with her Social Security number and say that she thinks her mother is receiving benefits for her without her knowledge. They should tell her. If her mother is receiving benefits, it is possible that all of the money is being used for food, housing costs, clothing, and other day-to-day basic needs. If no application has been filed, your daughter can appoint you as her representative to help her file the claim.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  7. My son is 11 years old and is receiving SSI . I have 10 years working at my job.We were in a car accident in May and i lost my vehicle it was a total loss and the insurance company paid off the bank 15 thousand and some. I didn’t receive any money and i don’t have the money for a down payment on a vehicle.I am not having any luck on getting a vehicle. I’m afraid that im going to lose my job. I’m concerned that my son will lose his SSI if i lose my job and i don’t work for a while. Will he lose his SSI ? I’m supposed to be returning back to work in August.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Norma,

      Your child will not lose his SSI benefits because you are not working. You do need to report the loss of wages and if you are getting compensation for wage loss due to the accident, you do need to report that income so that his SSI can be recalculated due to the change in parental income.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  8. Jennifer says:

    Hi Kay, My 19 y.o. daughter receives SSI at $487.67. Upon graduating this June, I have since stopped receiving $398.00 monthly in child support for her. This is the only income we have in the household. I have given notification/proof to Social Security of the income change alittle over a week ago. Will her SSI go up to the maximum? Thank you in advance.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jennifer,

      I am having some trouble reconciling the figures you are providing. The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) federal maximum benefit (FBR) is $733. Child support of $398 would result in an federal SSI benefit of $355. Also, the figure $487.57 is very close to $488.67, the amount paid to a person receiving support and maintenance in the form of free or subsidized housing and/or food but no other income. All this makes me wonder whether the child support was being counted previously.

      That aside, to answer your question: For your daughter to receive the maximum benefit, she would need to have no other income including support and maintenance in the form of free or reduced-price housing and/or food. So she needs to either pay fair market value (FMV) for room and buy her own food or pay FMV for room and board or pay her share of shelter and food. (Sometimes it is hard to prove a business rental relationship with an adult child because it is likely you would evict.)

      Fair market value for food would reasonably be the maximum food stamp grant for one person, which is $194.00.
      FMV for room is the amount such rooms are renting for in your geographic area. Social Security law does not specify an amount required to be paying fair market value for room because the economy is different in every location. You can figure out a fair market rental rate by looking at ads for room rentals in your area or by choosing state and county on the federal HUD website at https://www.huduser.gov/portal/datasets/fmr/fmr_il_history/select_Geography.odn. It will not list rooms, but it will list studio or efficiency (one-room) apartments. A room in a house would probably be about half of that amount.

      Share is the total shelter (and food if food is shared) costs divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

      If your daughter doesn’t have enough monthly income to do this, she could save up her SSI until she has enough saved to cover her share or FMV for two months. If she does this, she should save in a bank account to prove she had the money available. SSI would increase two months after she starts to pay her share or FMV.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  9. mercedes says:

    my mother past away 3 years ago and she had three checks before she past away that I gave to a nursing home to pay for her stay there. they never cashed them . then my mother pasted.SS They told me to bring the checks back and they were they sent me a form i filled it out and still nothing that money is the nursing homes…… how can i take care of this

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mercedes,

      If two or three months have passed since you returned the checks, ask the local office to follow up to the payment center for release of the funds. Let the nursing home know that you are still trying to get the money reissued. When you do get the payments, do not turn checks over to the nursing home; cash them and write them a personal check or buy a cashier’s check to have proof of having paid the nursing home bill.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  10. Quinton Williams says:

    Hey I want know SSDI will pay back to me in 6 month if I have to SSI and part time work??

  11. Quinton Williams says:

    Hey I have still in processing SSDI will pay back to me in 6 month if I get it approve since April got applied SSDI but I have to SSI and part time work??

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Quinton,

      If I understand you correctly, you receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and work part-time. If you are approved for Social Security Disability (SSD/SSDI) and your SSD is more than your SSI, you will be paid any back benefits that are due, reduced by the amount of SSI paid to you for the same period. Back benefits would begin the later of twelve months before you filed your application or as far back as the date you became insured for SSD.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  12. olicia says:

    I was recently approve ssi/ssdi and then after one check of ssi i was told by customer service i will no longer receive ssi only ssdi because i am receive $729.00 and ssi is allow only $733 not sure how they expect for me to survive on that with a child,but question is if i pay rent and let SSA know will i get back my ssi since my $729 will go towards rent

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Olicia,

      Please tell me how much your SSI was before the SSDI started and what your living arrangements are (with whom do you live and how much, if any, you pay for rent, shelter utilities and food if you share food. Shelter utilities are Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance. Then I will be able to answer your question.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  13. shelly says:

    Case Description
    My Son was getting SSI for a couple years , then my husband his apply for early Social Security. When my husband apply they put my son on his Social Security . Well My Husband work too many hours and owes Social Security money. But their also taking my son money, If he was still on SSI he still be getting his own money. Son buy his own food and over counter meds for hives, and personal needs, also he pays rent. He has a disability make hard for to work. He didn’t want to on his dad Social Security, Social Security told us to do that. My son is 28 he need his own income.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Shelly,

      If your husband’s overpayment is correct, it is likely that your son’s Social Security overpayment is correct also. If it is, then the months of benefits he was not eligible for and has to pay back should not count as income for SSI. I suggest that your son request a redetermination of his SSI benefit amount for the months that he was not eligible for Social Security dependent benefits.

      Note that if he is eligible currently for dependent benefits that are being withheld, the amount he is eligible for counts for SSI even though he’s not getting the benefits or all of them because they are being withheld for the overpayment past months. Stated a different way, the months for which to request recalculation of SSI are the months that he was overpaid Social Security, not current months. When he requests redetermination, it would be helpful to submit a copy of his Social Security overpayment letter that shows the months he was not eligible. One final note: Social Security in one month affects SSI payment amount two months later. So,if he was ineligible for Social Security and was overpaid in January 2016, his March SSI should be calculated without any Social Security.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  14. Erik Totten says:

    I only make so much a month which is not even close to getting my own place or pay bills how can I increase the payment, or Am I bound to live on the streets and beg for food and clothes?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Erik,

      You do not say what type of income you have or the amount, so I don’t have suggestions on how to increase your income. You might lower your expenses eventually by getting on a waiting list for government-subsidized housing in which the rent is based on your income.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  15. Lynn says:

    Hi I’m receiving social security and am currently engaged. If I were to get married would I lose my social security. I got it because I’m physically and mentally not able to work. Been that way since birth. Or would i have to check in with the people at the social security office.?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Lynn,

      If you are receiving Social Security Childhood Disability benefits on the earnings record of a disabled, retired or deceased parent, your benefits will stop when you get married. If you are receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) because you are disabled and have limited other income and assets, whether or not marriage would affect your benefits depends on how much income and assets your spouse has. You can take that information to Social Security before you marry to get a preview of the impact of marriage on your SSI. More information is also available in the article “What Are Deemed Income and Resources and How Do They Affect SSI Payment Amounts and Qualifying for SSI Disability?” under the SSI tab at the top of this webpage.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  16. rose vieira says:

    hi kay my name is rose i recently filed for ssi/ssdi but i hav benn disabled since 2012 i have an interview on thee 18th of august but i dont know if i will get back pay i have a 5 year old living with me and we live off food stamps will this affect the back pay

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rose,

      Having a child live with you and receiving food stamps will not affect your eligibility for SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  17. jen c says:

    so I have 2 daughter’s.one of my daughter’s is on ssi and getting 801 every month. my other daughter just got approved and waiting on first payment. I also get 686 for reach up.. how much will my daughter that just got approved recieve each month?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jen,

      I am unable to reply because I do not know what the “reach up” payment is. Please explain and I will try to respond.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  18. Mandy says:

    Hello,
    I will be a single mother of an autstic child. I am currently working and collecting $28 a month for him from SSI. I am in fear that i am about to lose my job due to the care of my son, therapy,appts, flares school,needing more care,etc. My living situation will also change, i am worried about how i am going to take care of my son in the event i am unable to work anymore. He is needing more and more care and his therpaist and doctors are suggecting i be a stay at home mom to care for him. Would anyone know if i am able to continue collecting and if my payments would go up if i lose my job or is forced to quit my job of 12 years to care for my son?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mandy,

      If you become unemployed and any unemployment benefits you receive are not too high for your son to be eligible for SSI, his SSI will continue. If you do not get unemployment, his SSI will increase to $733 if you are paying for all his shelter and food costs (with or without SNAP benefits). I also suggest that you check with your local Social Services office to find out whether your state has In-Home Support Service(IHSS) payments for individuals who care for severely disabled relatives and whether IHSS payments are made in a parent-child care situation.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  19. sabrina says:

    I am a single mom i just started working and make 2514 a month payed on the 5th and 20th. I have a daughter on ssi and a son thats not will she loose her ssi because i make to much?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sabrina,

      If your son does not have income, I estimate that your daughter’s SSI will be reduced by about $288.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  20. Angel says:

    I am a single mother of 1 daughter who is eligible for disability and I child who is not, I make $1500 a month approximately how much would my child be able to get for SSI?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Angel,

      If your disabled child does not have income and your $1,500 earnings are gross earnings, and you are paying for all your family’s shelter and food expenses (with or without food stamps), your child will be eligible for the maximum federal payment of $733.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  21. Angel says:

    I have COPD .I been fighting for ssdi for over 6 yrs. All they keep telling me is denied I have to take 6 different pills inhalers the machine I can’t even keep a job anymore.does any one have an idea what I can do . because I don’t know what else to do .any one pls .I have worked all my life and yet nothing

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Angel,

      You do not say whether you have appealed any of the denials or whether you have an appeal pending. If you do not have an appeal pending and you are outside the appeals period for your last denial, you can file new Social Security and Supplemental Security Income disability applications, claiming a disability date of the day after the last denial. Then get an attorney and appeal all the way if you really cannot work in any occupation.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  22. Jacuelyn says:

    If im a single parent and recieve SSI am i able to claim my kids cause im not able to work at all. People tell im not abl to claim my kids while im on SSI i need help

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jacuelyn,

      I understand your question to be a tax question. If so, I suggest that you talk with a tax accountant. If on the other hand you are asking whether your children can get benefits as your dependents, the answer is no if you are receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) because SSI does not pay dependent benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • tasha says:

        Hi Kay my two kids father is currently on ssi and I have a child support case in the works in Oklahoma should I continue with it or will nothing come out of it and should I just drop it and move on with taking care of my kids by myself as I have been doing. And thanks for your response.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Tasha,

          I cannot advise you on whether or not to pursue child support; I can provide some information. If the father of your children is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), his benefits cannot be garnished for child support and the maximum amount he can be receiving is $733 (slightly more in some states). If he is receiving Social Security Disability (SSD) and has a child support order and does not make payments, his SSD can be garnished. If he is receiving SSD, I recommend filing an application for you children to see whether Social Security dependent benefits are payable on his account.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  23. Jordan says:

    Hi I’m Jordan and hard of hearing. I have ssi and Medicaid n my kids medcaid . I get 731 a month and my boyfriend make under $2000 a month and I would like to know will I lose everyrhing ?
    Jordan

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jordan,

      Your boyfriend’s income does not affect your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. If he give you month or lives with you and pays more than his share of the shelter and/or food expenses, it will cause your SSI to be decreased. His share is the total expenses divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Jordan B Nelson says:

        I mean if I get marriage will I lose my ssi and Medicaid?

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Jordan,

          To tell you the impact of marriage to a spouse with $2,000 gross wages, I need to know the number of minor children and student children under age twenty-two.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Kay Derochie says:

            Dear Jordan,

            If you are medically approved for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), with your husband’s wages and two minor children, your SSI payment would be about $520 in months his income is included in the calculation. Note that income counts two months later. This means your SSI will increase in January, February, and March because he will have no income in November, December, and January.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

          • Jordan B Nelson says:

            Thank you so much. Jordan

          • Kay Derochie says:

            You are welcome, Jordan. Take another look at my response because right after I posted it. I added information about payment patterns.

      • Cori says:

        Kay, I just recently found out im pregnant. I am currently receiving SSI. They already know about me living with the boyfriend. Does having a baby affect anything? We split everything, he has his own acct/bills and I have my own acct/bills. We have never “shared” anything it has always been strictly “what’s mine is mine” and “you worry about your part” yes its a weird relationship lol

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Cori,

          When the child is born, your share of shelter and, if you share food, food expenses will drop to one-third of the total expenses. As long as you pay at least one-third, your SSI should not be affected by the birth of the child.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  24. Jordan B Nelson says:

    Why my comment delete?

  25. joseph says:

    Hi question i have is i am on ssi my next back pay will be march 2017 it will be over 2600 what will happen to my ssi will i loose my ssi because of my back pay.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Joseph,

      Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) back payments start counting as a resource on the first of the ninth month following the month in which you received the benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  26. Liza Camacho says:

    Hi ,I was wondering of my sons ssi payments they were lowered down to 10 dollars a month.and he is down syndrome. There saying I’m making 2000 a month.I’m a single parent.would that be right.if that’s supposed to be his checks for life. Wouldn’t he be getting the full amount. I really don’t understand how this works.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Liza,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a public assistance program that pays benefits to disabled and aged people who have limited income and assets. When the disabled person is a child, the income of the parents living with him is considered in determining payment amount. If your child is still disabled when he turns eighteen, your income will no longer affect his benefits.

      I cannot tell whether the $10 benefit is correct or not, but it seems low unless your child has other income such as child support or in-kind (non-cash) income in the form of free or subsidized housing. Are there months in which you get an “extra” paycheck, such as five weekly or three bi-weekly paychecks?

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  27. Jennifer says:

    I recive survivor benefits for my children and I get widow benefits for me my husband also had another kid who receives benefits how is the money dispersed after each child is taken off one of my kids is gonna be 18 where does that go?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jennifer,

      When a child is no longer eligible, the money is either paid out to the remaining survivors or simply stops and is not paid out because no one is eligible for it. The latter happens when the remaining eligible persons are already receiving the maximum percentage of the deceased worker’s Primary Insurance Amount that they are eligible for.

      Let me describe how that works. If the Maximum Family Benefit (FMB) is currently being paid, when one child becomes ineligible, the total amount of money now being paid to all the eligible survivors will be split among you and the minor children who remain eligible up to the maximum payable to any one survivor. Each child can potentially receive 75% of the deceased worker’s Primary Insurance Amount, but the actual amount is limited by the FMB when multiple people receive benefits on the amount. The FMB also applies to your widow’s benefits. If you are receiving benefits because you have a child under age sixteen in your care, your maximum potential benefit is 75%; if you are eligible based on being disabled and age fifty or based on being age sixty or over, your percentage is governed by the age at which you started to receive benefits. If you are receiving benefits because you have a child under age sixteen in your care and you don’t meet the disability or age requirements, your benefits will stop when the child turns sixteen. If you are receiving based on age or disability, your benefits will continue at your benefit percentage. The money paid to the children will not be paid out because no one is eligible for it. It stays in the Social Security trust fund. (Note that nearly always much more in benefits are paid out than the amount the worker paid in taxes.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  28. Heiress says:

    my husband used to receive disability benefits then, when he turned 18 his mother told him it’s best if he stopped receiving them so that he can work full time. Now that we are married we have one child Maybe mentally disabled like my husband. Would my husband still be able to qualify and if that will have any effect on my child’s ability to qualify?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Heiress,

      If your husband has worked and is now unable to work, he can apply for Social Security Disability (SSDI). If he has worked little or not at all, he can also apply for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Both your husband and your child can receive SSI if they qualify medically and the family income and assets are low enough. You can learn more about SSI by reading additional articles under the SSI tab at the top of this webpage.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  29. Mary Woodward says:

    Hi, my son is 3 years old and he is blind along with other medical issues that require very costly frequent prescriptions. I do not work and I stay home with my son right now and he receives sssi..well my question is Me and my boyfriend want to get married but my boyfriend makes a little over 5000 a month, my boyfriend is not his biological father but I’m curious if I marry him, will the Income he makes interfere with my sons ssi and Medicaid? The cost of one of my sons medications is 100,000 for two injections.. he requires two a month. With Medicaid the co pay is $0 but regular insurance I imagine the co pay would be around 20% which I don’t imagine anyone would be able to afford? Is there a way I can get married and still have my son keep all his benefits? Even if not the ssi but still keep the Medicaid Since the man I’m marrying is not his parent? Please let me know whenever you can please

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Mary,

      If you marry your boyfriend and you and your son live with him, his income will be considered in determining your son’s eligibility for SSI. Your boyfriend’s income is too high for your son to receive benefits. (You and he would have to be supporting four other children for your child to be eligible for SSI.) It is likely that $5,000 a month would result is loss of Medicaid with a zero co-pay, but I suggest you check with the Medicaid office to see if your family would be eligible for a buy-down Medicaid eligibility, where you pay a certain amount per month for medical care and Medicaid picks up the rest.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  30. Jennifer says:

    Hi, my twin sons have received ssi in the past and stopped receiving it when our income increased. Our income decreased again, what steps do I take to get it back. My husband makes approximately 3200/month. 15.78/hrs for 45 hrs

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Jennifer,

      If your children have been financially ineligible for less than twelve months, you can just submit pay stubs to show that family income has gone down and benefits will be restarted. If it has been more than twelve months, you have to file new claims for your sons and get new medical decisions.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

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