What responsibilities does a representative payee have to maintain SSI disability eligibility for a child?

By / March 3, 2016 / SSI Benefits / 265 Comments

Learn when a representative payee must set up a Dedicated Account & set aside funds and what’s needed to maintain SSI disability eligibility for a child.

General SSI Reporting Responsibilities
If you are a representative pay for either an adult or a child, it is your responsibility to report all the changes that are listed in our SSI reporting responsibilities article. Reporting all changes by the tenth of the month following the month of the change will allow you and the Social Security Administration to stay current on the child’s SSI disability eligibility and financial eligibility.

In addition, you must open and manage a Dedicated Account if the disabled child for whom you are representative payee receives a large past-due SSI payment and Social Security advises you that the money must be put in a Dedicated Account. The account must show the child as owner and that you manage the funds.

Past-due payments that require deposit in a Dedicated Account cannot be mingled with the child’s other resources and use of the funds is restricted to educational expenses, job skills training, and medical expenses. Social Security may also approve use of the funds for impairment-related needs such as in-home nursing care, special equipment, housing modifications, and therapy or rehabilitation. The money in the Dedicated Account cannot be used for basic monthly maintenance of food, shelter, or clothing.

The representative payee must keep bank records and receipts for at least two years to prove use of the funds and provide an explanation of how each expenditure relates to the child’s disability. If you stop being the representative payee, you must provide an accounting and turn the funds over to the new payee. If the disabled child turns eighteen and remains eligible for SSI as an adult, the restrictions on use of the dedicated funds remain in place. This is true even if the child-now-adult is his or her own payee.

Because the money in the Dedicated Account cannot be used for food or shelter, it does not count toward the individual resource limit of $2,000 or the couple resource limit of $3,000 for SSI disability eligibility.

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  • Dear Gloria,

    The maximum amount counted for in-kind support and maintenance is $265 even if the actual amount is more. If he has no other income, the $20 general exclusion is applied to it, so that the reduction in benefits will be $245.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Gloria,

    Your household’s shelter and food expenses are $3,100 ($1,600 mortgage, $300 utilities, $1,200 food). Your son’s share is 1/6th or $266 so he will be getting $266 support and maintenance from you. The law is that the maximum charged for support and maintenance is $265, even the share is actually more. (Shelter expenses are shelter utilities [power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage] and rent or mortgage, property tax, and if required by the lender property insurance.)

    Your son’s benefits can be used to pay his share of non-shelter expenses such as Internet if he uses Internet. Otherwise, it is to be used to meet his other needs such as dental, vision, medical care, clothing, school supplies and activities, therapies not covered by insurance, recreation, and so on. He can have $2,000 countable assets, which includes savings. He can also buy a $1,500 burial insurance policy and a cemetery plot. Those items will not count toward the resource limit.

    As far as documenting use of benefits and payment of his share, if you are your son’s payee, the account will belong to him but you will be the only one with access. I suggest setting up a checking account so you can write yourself a check each month or do an electronic transfer each month to your account to cover his payment for food and shelter. Keep the bank statements and receipts for all other expenditures.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Gloria,

    Your son will be approved for $490 per month, which is a one-third reduction from the maximum payable. The reduction is because he is not paying for his share of housing and food, which is the shelter expenses and food divided by six, and his share is more than $265 per month. If he starts paying his share once SSI starts, the SSI can be increased to $735. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax, and if required by the lender property insurance.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Lisa,

    Your older son’s moving into the household will not affect your younger son’s SSI. If your older son starts to work and contribute to household expenses, his contribution will not affect the SSI payment as long as he does not contribute more than his share.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Michelle,

    I am unable to give you a benefit estimate. You are likely to be asked to provide a financial update back to last July because each month’s benefits is calculated separately. Apparently someone is supporting you and your child by providing shelter, so there may be some countable in-kind (non-cash) income that will affect payment amount. Once that update has been done, you should receive benefits within a month or less. If the back pay is $4,410 or more, it will be paid into a restricted use account called a Dedicated Account. You can read about dedicated accounts at https://www.ssa.gov/kc/rp_accounts.htm.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Micgelle,

    Yes, I would think so because it is an educational expense that could prepare him for vocational training in the future.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Derrick,

    Most of the time SSI monthly payments start before back pay is released, but not always; occasionally back benefits are paid first.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Derrick,

    You are finding out that your claim is moving through the process so it may continue to move forward.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Peggy,

    You can go to Social Security and apply to be payee for your grandson. Explain the situation and put the explanation on the application as well as explaining verbally. If you have any proof of your grandson living with you such as school records or his pediatrician’s statement, it would be helpful to take that with you. You will also need his Social Security number so his claim can be identified.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Derrick,

    You can spend the money on anything you want or need; however, don’t give it away because giving away a resource can cause future ineligibility.

    The SSI back pay will not count toward the $2,000 resource limit until nine months after you receive it. The $2,000 limit includes more than money in bank accounts; it includes cash, other investments, the cash value of whole-life insurance policies, second vehicles, boats, etc. It does not include several things, for example, one vehicle, a home you live in, normal household items and clothing, burial policies of up to $1,500, and a cemetery plot.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Micgelle,

    No, funds in a Dedicated Account cannot be used for normal shelter, food, clothing, entertainment, etc.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear JaymeLynn,

    I don’t believe that your tax refund can be withheld to repay a Social Security overpayment. I do suggest that you set up the repayment arrangements you mention as promptly as you can.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Queen,

    If you haven’t, I suggest that you follow up politely (even if you are put out) with the local office asking if they need anything else from you and, if not, whether they can give you an estimate on when they will make the adjustment in your payment amount.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Queen,

    The increase in your benefits should have begun in the second month after you started paying rent. You may be liable for repayment of an overpayment that occurred when your mother was your payee because presumably you benefited from the overpayment. You can, however, try to get a waiver of repayment based on not being at fault in causing the overpayment (you were a minor and not receiving benefits directly) and not being able to afford to repay. If the waiver is denied, you can request a small amount to be withheld from your SSI each month to collect the overpayment.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Micgelle,

    You need to get permission to use the money for the repair. I suggest that you write up a statement along the lines I suggested justifying the expenditure to maintain your child’s health. You might also describe the condition of the floor (danger of falling, mold, etc.) to your son’s doctor to see the doctor would write a supporting statement.

    Then take that to Social Security and request the permission to use the amount of the money needed to get the repair done. Take estimates from contractors to prove the amount. If given permission, request the permission in writing. Then keep indefinitely the permission and proof of what you actually pay for the repair in case any question comes up in the future.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear JPD,

    First of all, there is a difference between Adult Protective Services (APS) and the Social Security Administration (SSA). I suggest that if the information you can give APS does not satisfy the issue, that you consult with an attorney to help with the charges from Adult Protective Services because those charges could have criminal penalties.

    As far as proving what you spent the money on, you say that you have been handling the budget, but if you did not file to be payee and your wife continued to be payee, every year she would have had to have filed with SSA a representative payee accounting form. If she kept a copy of it or she can get a copy from SSA, she can submit that to APS.

    Also, if her basic needs (food, shelter, and clothing) are met, unless her benefit has been fairly high, it would be hard to prove misuse. Apparently, your daughter is an adult, but you do not say whether she lives with you and her mother or not. If not, the landlord where she lives should have proof that you or her mother paid her rent for the period in question; the same with the utility bills. If she lived with you, it is valid to use her funds to pay her share of shelter expenses and food.

    Your stepdaughter’s share is the total shelter expenses and food expenses if you all share food divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax, and if required by the lender property insurance. If you have provided her with a phone, you can likely get proof of the amount you have paid from the cell phone company. You would not have receipts for money of hers that you applied to shelter and food costs, but you can probably get proof of the full amount of the costs, which indirectly would prove her share. Otherwise, try to estimate the amount spent on clothing, hair cuts, feminine hygiene and other grooming products for her and anything else including the amount of spending money she was given per month on an average.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Micgelle

    On my son’s backpay SSI said i buy computer for him how much can i spend on that

    • Dear Micgelle,

      No limit would be set on the amount your spend on the computer; it would be reasonable to spend what is necessary to get him the features that meet his needs.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Micgelle

        What kind house modifications can i do u was wandering if i replace floor in our bathroom since it’s bout fall in and can we buy TV for family to watch

        • Dear Micgelle,

          Repair of the bathroom floor is a safety issue for your child, so I would think that using his SSI back pay for the repairs would be acceptable. The TV purchase would depend on how much it is for your son; if your son rarely watches TV, then the purchase would not really be for his entertainment and might not be acceptable.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Micgelle

            So if i took my son back pay repair my bathroom floor that be OK or do indeed ask domeone

            • Dear Micgelle,

              If the money is not in a Dedicated Account, you can reasonably use the money for the repair. Keep receipts and if questioned about it at any time, indicate that you used the money for the repair because the floor was a safety and health hazard for your son and you did not have other money to use to keep his environment safe.

              Sincerely,
              Kay

      • Micgelle

        Can i use back on life skills and what r life skills i can do

        • Dear Micgelle,

          If your child’s doctor or another evaluator has recommended occupational therapy to help your child with life skills that would fall under therapy and you should be able to use money in the Dedicated Account for that without asking permission.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Dear Angelika,

    If you put your child’s money in a bank account it should be kept separate from your own funds and the title of the account should be “your son’s name by your name, representative payee.” When you were made payee, you should have been given a pamphlet that explains the responsibilities of a payee. You can read about these at https://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/handbook/handbook.16/handbook-1616.html and https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10076.pdf.

    Your child’s needs should be met before saving funds; however, your child can have up to $2,000 in assets. If he has more now due to payment of back benefits, the back benefits will start to count toward the limit on the first day of the ninth month after the back benefits were paid.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Benjamina,

    Deposit to a restricted-use Dedicated Account is required when more than six months of back benefits are payable. If you were not told to open a Dedicated Account then in all likelihood one was not necessary.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Payton,

    Your work activity has to be reported whether or not you deposit your work earnings into a bank account. Your mom is right that your working does raise some question about whether you are still disabled. However, if you have not recovered physically or mentally from your disability, you can earn $7,200 a year (no more than $1790 in a single month) while under age twenty-two and a full-time student.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear TJ,

    You can give your son spending money or money to purchase a specific items for himself–just see that he actually purchases the planned items. As long as your son’s current needs are being taken care of there is no limit on saving for future needs or college or trade school.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Christina,

    You can request that the overpayment be collected by withholding only part of any current benefits that are payable.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Benjamina,

    I would say that it is reasonable to use some of the monthly benefits to replace the chairs. (Money set aside in a Dedicated Account can not be used for this purpose.)

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Benjamina,

    The primary purpose of SSI payments is to pay for housing, heat, lights, water, garbage service, and food, so you can use your child’s monthly SSI funds to pay for any of those things.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Latisha,

    If the calls are coming from the local office and not from the Disability Determination Services, I suggest that if possible you take time off work and go to the office. To minimize the wait time, get there twenty minutes before they open and wait at the door so that you are one of the first in line to be seen. Say that you have been getting calls when you are at work and can’t answer, can never get through by phone when you do call, and need to know why they are calling and what is needed.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Andrea,

    You do need to report the marriage and your husband’s income, and you will be asked for his Social Security number. They will not ask about his immigration status.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • You are welcome, Keisha.

  • Dear Keisha,

    There was no overpayment so the overpayment should be cleared up. Ongoing you should get full payment for the children without consideration of your income or resources. I am unable to find in the regulations that underpayments due to calculation errors are limited to two years although it is possible I am not locating the reference. I suggest that you ask to be shown in the Federal Code or the Procedural and Operations Manual where it says a two-year limit. If they continue to limit the underpayment to two years and cannot show you a reference, after the payment is released, you can appeal the amount.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Diana,

    Just make the report now. If no one besides you is paying for your daughter’s shelter, the late report won’t make a difference.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Lori,

    You can use the back pay to purchase a home as long as the home is in your daughter’s name.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Jennifer,

    Your approval for benefits included the determination that for physical or mental reasons you are not capable of consistently managing your benefits to see that housing, food, and medical care are paid for first before other purchases. For that reason, your benefits are being sent to a payee for management.

    The check proves that any bank account that is opened must be in your name but under the control of your aunt. The title of the account will be “your name by your aunt’s name, representative payee.” This means that you will not have direct access to the funds and that your aunt will pay your bills and manage the remaining money for your benefit. If you find you need something, discuss the need with your aunt so the need can be met or saved for.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Tia,

    I think that they are saying that the cause of the overpayment was your income. The overpayment is subject to collection from your son’s current benefits. Back pay will likely be applied to the overpayment. If any is left over it will be paid to you. If the overpayment is larger than the back pay, you can request small monthly withholding to repay the balance.

    One last option would be to request waiver of repayment. If you reported your earnings on time each month and thought your son was being paid correctly, you could request waiver based on not being at fault in causing the overpayment and not being able to afford repayment

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Tia,

    I need more information to understand the situation. What kind of benefits stopped? Why did they stop? Is the back pay from the same benefit program? How/when did the overpayment occur? When I know more, I will try to respond.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • Dear Ab,

    Your first responsibility as payee is to pay for your child’s housing, shelter utilities, food, clothing, personal hygiene items, laundry soap, and school supplies. Her housing and utilities are reasonably her share (the cost divided by the number of people in household). I suggest that you figure out the amount of her monthly benefits you need to use for those items and allocate her benefits to them. If there is money left over, then it would be reasonable to use some of it to pay part of your car payment.

    Sincerely,
    Kay

  • You are welcome, Chrissi.

  • Chrissi

    Hey! On Wednesday my 4 yr old was approved for Ssi, this morning I received a deposit of 2199.00 in my account
    Does this mean I don’t have to set up a dedicated account for my son. The case worker said he will call with details but never did and he never mention a dedicated account. What does this mean?

    • Dear Chrissi,

      Dedicated funds are typically deposited directly to the Dedicated account, so the funds in the paper check probably are not subject to dedicated use. However, I recommend that you clarify the matter before spending any of the funds for anything other than what is allowed from a Dedicated Account.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Lashunda lockett

    Hi i have a ? My son was found disabled as of april 2016 we recieved 2199 back pay oct 30 in form of a paper check and i was told to open up a dedicated account for the remaining 1929 back pay and i received 1 regular ssi payment for nov. As of December i received a lump sum for myself of 3000 so they say he is not eligible for december so i have set up his dedicated account what happens with his remaining 1929 back benefits since he is not eligible for december

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Lashunda,

      Double check with Social Security, but, I think that if your son will be ineligible for only one month, the money still has to be placed in a Dedicated Account for future use following the Dedicated Account guidelines.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Hello, i have a question. I am my sons payee on his account. Ssi just took me off of his account to be the payee. I dont know why. Is there any way i can become his payee again?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Shimeka,

      If your son is an adult and capable of handling his funds to pay for housing, food, and other needs, he may have successfully applied to receive his benefits directly.
      If your son is a minor residing with you, it would be unusual to have someone else be payee unless you have an alcohol or drug dependency or have been convicted of certain crimes. I suggest that you contact the Social Security Administration to inquire why you were removed and if you disagree reapply to be payee. Note that they will not tell you who the new payee is.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Kim

    Hello. We live in FL. After reading the article and going through the comments I am a little bit more confused. My son (14yr) just recently started receiving SSI for High Functioning Autism. He did receive the 1st portion of his back pay awarded. This I have in a dedi. Now, I know I have to have/save receipts for any money used out of this dedi, but do I have to do the same for the monthly payments into the other acct? I haven’t really saved any receipts for what I have spent the monthly payments on, but I write it all down as I use it and subtract from balance to keep a running tally of how much is in the monthly account (balancing the account).

    Also, the reporting of wages, his father is the only one working. Should I be reporting his income monthly since at times he does go over 40hrs/wk and gets paid overtime? Or should I just report on those months where he actually DOES get OT (he has not gotten OT in a couple months)?

    Lastly, being HFA, my son is extremely intelligent and scores way above grade level. His school is going to work on challenging him more, but I would like to possibly get him tutoring to advance him even more and even possibly start prepping him for dual enrollment (College courses while in HS) and ACT/SAT tests. Is this allowed? Do I really need to get written permission for this since I would like to use monies from the dedi to pay for it. And one of the tutoring “schools” (Ok Sylvan) have special STEM like programs I would like to put him in, but the nearest location which has the specific program he would be interested in is an hour away. Can I also use monies from the dedi to pay for the gas to get him to and fro from this particular campus? These programs would also greatly benefit his social skills learning.

    Finally, (ok one more) I would like to purchase him a new PC out of his dedi account. Should I get written permission for this too? Or can I just purchase it and save the receipt and report it at the end of the year? I wouldn’t think they would frown upon a PC since he will most likely be taking practice tests at home online for dual enrollment/ACT/SAT. How do I get written permission? Do I just write a letter with a list of what I would like to use the money for and go to the SSI Administration?

    Thank you for any information you can provide to help me navigate through this confusing thing!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kim,

      You can use money from the Dedicated Account for the tutoring. You could get a statement from your son’s school or the from Sylvan that he needs the PC for his classes or tutoring; however, I note that you say a “new” computer. Does he already have one? If so, there would need to be an educational need for a newer one to use the funds. You can also use some of the money for gas to get him to the tutoring classes.

      The ledger you are keeping is a good idea and good documentation. It would be good to keep receipts for clothing purchases, school field trips, and other things that are not ongoing regular expenses like food, shelter, personal hygiene, allowance, etc.

      Report changes in his father’s income every time they occur, both increases and decreases including decreases back to base pay. Reports should be made by the tenth of the month following the month of change. If you are not already reporting by phone, I suggest checking to see whether your son’s claim qualifies for telephone reporting.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • My son is fixing to me draw disability off of his father. I know what the monthly money can be used for but what can the backpay be used for?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Christi,

      Your son is about to receive Social Security dependent benefits, not Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Accordingly, the same rules apply to the back pay as for monthly benefits. The money must be used for your son’s current needs or saved for future needs such as medical and dental care and education. Keep a record of how the money is spent (housing, food, allowance) and keep receipts for personal items purchased for the child such as clothing, medical bills, haircuts, school supplies and activities,etc.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Janice

    Hi yes my daughter get SSI last yr and she still gets it they just sent me a later asking for the rent receipt and receipts to show wat I spent the money on bt I dont have all the receipts wat will happen if I cant show proif

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Janice,

      You can get a letter from your landlord stating that you paid rent every month since the SSI started. You may also be able to get an accounting from your utility companies. You can make a written statement of how much of that rent and utilities were paid with the SSI check. In the statement, say that you did not keep receipts and estimate how much you spent for your daughter’s food, her clothing, personal hygiene, medical and dental care, school costs, and entertainment. If you made special purchases such as a bed or other items for her, estimate the cost of those, too. Add up everything you put in the statement to see if it comes close to equalling the benefits you got for her. State that you will keep receipts in the future. As long as your did not use your daughter’s money for anyone other than her and you make a reasonable estimate to itemize it, this one time of not keeping receipts may not be a problem.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Gennsing

    Hi I have a question that everyone seems unable to answer. My daughter used to get SSI. She also gets a 94 dollar benefits under me. I receive Social Security disability. I do not receive SSI or medicaid. I have a part time job and Ssdi. Because of my job I was constantly getting charged with overpayments on my daughter’s account. She has a job as well and works about 18 hours a week both of these things contributed to us constantly being in trouble with Social Security. We finally had enough and voluntarily terminated my daughters SSI benefits. She still gets the $94 benefit on the 3rd of the month under my account. here is my question…. we still have some money left in her dedicated account from back pay. Can we finally spend that money?. my daughter is now 17. She might be eligible for the adult child benefit under my case when she is 18 but we don’t really want it as I am encouraging her to move forward with work and school. We would like to use that money for school or help toward purchase a new home.

    • Gennsing

      Oh yes I might have mentioned as well… Even though we voluntarily terminated my daughter’s SSI even if we wanted to reapply we would not be eligible as we are now over the resource limit

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Gennsing,

        Please see my response to your first post. Once your daughter is age eighteen, her parents’ assets and income will not affect her SSI eligibility. Neither do the funds in the Dedicated Account count toward her $2,000 limit.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Gennsing,

      You or your daughter after she is eighteen should be able to use the money in the Dedicated Account for her college or vocational training, disability-related expenses, and/or medical care. The money cannot be used for the purchase of a house, but if such a house needed to be modified for handicap access, the money could be used for the modification. Any other use would have to be approved in advance and I recommend that you get the approval in writing. Also keep receipts for any services purchased with the money.

      I would suggest that your daughter pursue Childhood Disability Benefits on your account, assuming she is earning less than $1,130 gross per month. (She can apply three months before her eighteenth birthday.) The reason is that Social Security has various work incentives for disabled people including the Ticket to Work, which can include vocational rehabilitation services and/or job placement and continuation of benefits while attempting to work. Additionally, if she were to continue to meet the definition of disability and be unmarried, her benefits would continue and increase upon your death. You can learn more about the work incentives in Social Security’s Red Book, which is available online at http://www.ssa.gov. Additional information specific to the Ticket to Work is available from the Ticket to Work hotline at 1-866-968-7842.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Gennsing

        I’m sorry but I don’t get it we don’t want any benefits and I don’t understand if we are not getting benefits why we cannot spend the money how we choose

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Gennsing,

          I suggest that you and your daughter talk to the Social Security Administration to see whether there is an exception to the restricted use of funds in the Dedicated Account once eligibility has ended. I was not able to find anything about it in my research.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Jennifer

    My son is receiving temporary ssi in a dedicated account for up to 6 mo. while they verify that he qualifies. What exactly am I allowed to use this money on for him? I know it’s for his needs only and I don’t want to spend it on the wrong things. We also receive supplimental assistance for food and i was told it was being reduced since my son was receiving ssi (which from what I’ve read funds in a dedicated account can’t be for food, shelter, and clothing – correct?), and theyre counting that as part of my income. Can anyone help me understand how this works, if that’s correct, and what I can actually use his funds on bc I’m scared to use them, but I don’t want to let them sit there and not use them like we don’t really need the funds. TIA

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jennifer,

      If your son is receiving presumptive disability or provisional disability monthly benefits, they should not be paid into a Dedicated Account. Dedicated Accounts are required for back pay paid all at one time that exceeds six months of benefits. So I suggest that first you double check with Social Security that the account needed to receive his benefits is really a Dedicated Account and not just an account set up for your son with you as payee.

      If the money was paid all at once and thus required to go into a Dedicated Account, take whatever written proof you have such as a letter that your son’s provisional benefits were paid to a restricted-use account. Also take proof of the allowed uses for the money–either the brochure you were given or a printout from Social Security’s website https://secure.ssa.gov/poms.nsf/lnx/0200602140 to the office providing food assistance to show that the Dedicated Account funds cannot be used for food or shelter.

      Allowed use of Dedicated Account funds are education, rehabilitation, job training, or needs related to your son’s disability. Examples of the last category might include gas to get him to medical appointments or childcare if he cannot be left alone because of his disability, a sheepskin mattress cover if he is confined to bed, or a humidifer if he has asthma, etc.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      Si

  • Mitchell

    Hi my 19 month old son is very sick and has a syndrome that there is no cure for and chronic respiratory failure and a lung disease. He currently receives ssi benefits 733 a month. I’m the representative for his ssi and report my wages monthly. We are a family of 5 my wife doesn’t work she has to stay home with our son and the other 2 kids are 9 and 10. I am in the process of getting a 2nd job to help pay for therapy not covered by insurance and equipment not covered by insurance that he needs. Also, to improve our living arrangements and conditions. I currently gross around 900 a month, the second job I will gross around 1200 a month will my disabled child lose his ssi benefits due to me getting a second part time job?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Mitchell,

      Now that your child is over age eighteen, your income and assets do not affect his financial eligibility for SSI benefits and you do not need to report your earnings. When is necessary for your son to receive the maximum SSI of $733 is for him to pay his share of shelter and food expenses. His share is the total expenses divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

      If you made a typographical error and your son is under age eighteen, your income is considered in determining his benefits; however, with two parents and two SSI-ineligible children, work earnings of $2,100 will not reduce your son’s SSI.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Tammy

    Dear Kay,
    First, Thank you for your help with my question last month. I have one more question I was hoping you would be able to answer. My son has received his first installment of back pay but not his regular monthly payment yet. We are in desperate need of the following and I was not sure how or if it’s possible to get these. First my son has chronic asthma issues which was a big part of his approval. He goes back and forth between sleeping on my bed or on the mattress on his floor. My mattress and bed was in the home when we moved in and because of his nighttime accidents smells heavily of urine and smoke from the homeowner we rent from. His doctor has provided me a note suggesting getting him a new bed and mattress as he cannot get a used one because it could set off his breathing issues. Is this possible? Is it possible to replace my own as well for health reasons? Additionally the rubber bellow in my washing machine is torn which causes water to flood the floor and presents a issue of mold. I can repair the washer myself and save costs. Would I be allowed to purchase the part needed to be able to provide him with clean clothes without flooding the floor? Also, I recently had to borrow $100 to get my car turned back on so that I could pick up medicine and be able to transport him to preschool. My used car payment was short and they would not turn it back on without the rest of the money I owed them. Can I pull out the money that was borrowed to pay it back? Lastly there is a large leak from pipes that is leaking badly over the kitchen table. Because I back owe on rent so much I am responsible for my own repairs. Can I get an estimate for that to be able to get the leak repaired? If these can be approved how does it work? Do you purchase first and turn in receipts? or fill out a special request form? I know this seems like a lot but because he is sick so often I have not been able to keep a job and we have nothing to our names.
    Thank you in advance for any advice you are able to provide.
    -Tammy

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tammy,

      If your son’s back pay was not paid into a Dedicated Account, you can use the back pay for the car, the bed, and the washer because your son uses them all. The only items that could be in question are the leaky pipe when you don’t own the property and your bed. With regard to your bed, given the nature of your son’s disability, I would say that removing a contaminent from the home would make it acceptable. (Buying rubber sheets for the new beds would be advisable.) Regarding the pipe, you might be able to justify it as payment in lieu of paying back rent and thus a shelter expense. Keep the receipts so that you have them for reference when once a year you are asked to account for use of his funds. If the funds were paid into a Dedicated Account, you have to request permission in advance to use the money as for all these items. You would request them on the basis that they are necessary for his health.
      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Tammy

        Thank you Kay,
        I am not sure what the proper process is so I called the 800 number for Social Security and the woman on the phone said I would be fine purchasing the washer part, bed and mattress for my child. considering his sensitivity to allergens and mold as well as the need for clean clothing. Did I receive permission properly? Everything I have just says to contact Social Security.

        • Tammy

          The money was put into a dedicated account for him.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Tammy,

          If it were I, I would go into the office with a written request to use the dedicated money for those items and get a written approval, which could be written across the bottom, signed by the representative, and date stamped. That way, if there is a question down the line, you have proof of approval.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

        • Jessica

          My son is on ssi an my mom is payee for him but I want to be payee an I am fighting with my mom about it an she told me that social security will cancel my son ssi if I was payee cause I am not the greatest with math now is that true can social security cancel if I’m payee

          • Kay Derochie

            Dear Jessica,

            If Social Security decides that you are capable of being your son’s representative payee, they will switch the checks over to you; your son’s benefits will not be terminated. I do have a suggestion, however. Because that you said that you are not good at math, I suggest that for a couple of months at the beginning of the month that you figure out and write down how you would spend your child’s benefit for that month, that is, make a budget that includes housing, food, clothing, medical care, school costs, transportation to medical appointments, and all the rest of your child’s needs. That will let you know whether you can handle the benefits. If you find that you can make the budget for using the amount that he receives over a couple of months, you could apply and show the budgets you have prepared.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

  • Si

    Hi,

    Hope you can help. This is so confusing. Here’s the situation.

    When I qualified for SS (my wife does not as yet), they gave us both a stipend for our minor child, to be used for his benefit. We set everything up as required, accounts in his name with each of us as the custodian.

    My wife pays for most of the education expenses, clothes, and miscellaneous. With the stipend we were finally able to rent a slightly larger place and he has his own room. I pay that and deduct a small amount per month from the stipend to allow for it, also paying for school uniforms, supplies, lunches, food, medical and dental expenses.

    In both accounts, the balance earns a small amount of interest.

    Okay…questions.

    1. We’ve been very frugal and have about 35% of the money left over each month, after expenses. When we report this in the annual submission to Social Security, is it likely that they’ll reduce the benefits because we didn’t need to use it all? We could have spent more, but we wanted to be conservative.

    2. More worrisome is the uncertainty of taxes. SS has issued both of us a 1099 for the total amount. When all this started they told me (verbally) that it was unlikely we would pay taxes on the stipends, but to hire a tax advisor.

    If we get hit for the gross amount of these stipends, we are in trouble because we don’t have the extra money to pay them. The stipends are wonderful and we’re appreciative, but there’s nothing extra to pay additional income taxes with — unless we use the balances in these accounts…and I’m sure SS would not be happy with that, probably stopping the benefits.

    If you could clear this up, we’d be grateful.

    Thank you!

    • Si

      By the way, our child is not disabled. Sorry if this forum is just for parents of children with special circumstances, and we’re trespassing. Didn’t mean any disrespect.

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Si,

        I did not see this comment when I responded to your first post, so please disregard the portion of my response about SSI. If the money really is going into two account with your son’s name on them, you and your wife need to clarify with Social Security what kind of benefits are being paid. If one is for your wife, she needs to correct the situation by having the benefits deposited to a different account in her name only or a joint account with you, transfer the funds from the incorrectly labeled account to her own account, and close the account with the erroneous title of ownership.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Si,

      Social Security never splits a benefit paying it to two different representative payees. Either your child is disabled and he is getting Social Security dependent benefits and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for disability or your wife is receiving a young wife’s benefit for having a child under sixteen in her care.

      If the benefits are all Social Security, how much you save up will not affect benefits. If your child is receiving SSI, the maximum in countable assets including savings that he can have and remain eligible is $2,000. As far as taxes go, if you file jointly and your joint income is below $32,000 a year Social Security benefits are not taxed by the federal government. Amounts above that are taxed on a graduated basis. I am not sure how a dependent’s benefits are handled as related to the parent’s tax return, so you do need to have a tax accountant figure up your tax liability, if any. Note that at any time, you can have federal income tax withheld from the Social Security benefits. SSI benefits are not taxable.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Kia

      Can you use back pay for a tutor?

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Kia,

        Yes, you can use the back pay for a tutor for your child, even if the back pay was paid into a Dedicated Account.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  • lisa heath

    I erroneously posted this as a reply to someone else’s question, then after reading through the Q&A, I realized my error so I apologize for having to re-post…. I am curious about payday and title loans with respect to a MINORS SSI. Is it legal for these companies (or a violation of SS rules and regulations) to allow a rep payee to knowingly(by both parties) list their child’s SSI payments on their loan application as the qualifier for the loan? Parent is unemployed, sole household income is the child’s, and that fact would also be disclosed to lender. I know it is unethical , but are they allowed to do it even though the child is a minor and therefore cannot legally co-sign the loan? Thank you so much for being here! Lisa *-)

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Lisa,

      I do not know whether what you describe is legal. You would probably have to check with your state’s department that regulates payday loans. (I do know that SSI income can be listed as household income for the purposes of purchasing a home.) As far as the SSI program goes, I would say that it shows poor money management on the part of the parent, because payday loans are expensive in interest and part of the SSI is going to pay the interest on lthe loan. However, if the child’s needs are being met, the representative payee is probably meeting his or her legal responsibilities as a payee.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • lisa heath

        Thank you for your response!

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Lisa.

  • Brittney

    A couple of questions as I can not reach my SSA. My son recently was approved. The person who helped us just said to get a seperate account and that he will get 4mnths of back pay but for now 2199.00 is going in and the remaining 4th mnth of 733 will go in in jan. My question one is… He didnt say anything like what im reading where its called a dedicated account and not to touch the funds for certain things. Nor did he say anything about not keeping monthly separate from the back pay… SO my question is.. Is the 4mnth counted as needed a dedicated account? should i have been told to set up two accouts? Or b/c its only 4mnths that we get is it not considered needed or labeled as a dedicated account?
    Second question… My husband makes 1100.00 a month i was making 550.00 i have an opp to make 1400.00 now a month we are a family of 5… (husband, self, two no disable , and one disabled child) We pay 850.00 in rent and have only one car will this pay increase if i get the job take away or limit my sons benefits
    it already took away some of our SNAP. thanks for any help you can give

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Brittney,

      A minor child’s SSI back pay only goes into a restricted-use Dedicated Account when the amount is over six times the Federal Benefit Rate (FBR) plus any Optional State Supplementation. The FBR is the maximum federal SSI benefit, which is now $733. Given the number of children you have, your new job will not affect the amount of your disabled child’s SSI benefit.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • joe santos

    Hi im divorced aplay for social security disability, my kid is 9 years old is ok to recive social security disability benefits independent,but she live w/ her mother,her mom maried again she do not social security number yet to be the paypee, so i request to be the paypee rep w/ her aprove utill she will be approved on immigration stusd to get Social Security, allthis will efect me on my social security disabilits benefits if is aprove.I recive food stamp, and cash assisted , mass healthcare and my kid have masshealth care we loose this benefits if wee r aprove for the social disability benefits.thanks.joe

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Joe,

      Your being payee for your child will not reduce your benefits. You need to check with Massachusetts social services office to learn the impact of getting Social Security on your other benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Nel

    Thank you so much for your help!

    I also wanted to ask you…
    Last week I received a “Representative Payee Report” for me to fill out (For the first time).
    They are asking me about the money received between may 2015 and current… about how much I used and how much I saved…
    The thing is that I remember I started getting checks for my child from March or maybe even February 2015…
    After that they started deducting some money because they said they had overpaid… well, the thing is that the checks were sent earlier… In one of the letters it states “back payment” of $700 something and I am not sure if more was sent as back payment too because I don’t have all of the attached letters…
    All the money went to the same account… not sure if I had to keep it separately or spend it differently…
    How to provide this information? What to do?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Nel,

      Keep it simple and answer the questions based on benefits received May 2015 to present. Look at bank records to determine the amount paid since then. That is the amount to account for now. (Unless you were asked to set up a Dedicated Account, back benefits can be co-mingled with monthly benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Nel

        The Representative Payee Report says:

        Benefits paid to you between 05/01/2015 and 04/30/2016 = $3,895

        Then it asks how much of that I have saved…
        So I just have to check how much money was spent between those dates and subtract to the $3,895?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Nel,

          The math you suggest would tell you how much of the beneficiary’s money you have left; but it is not a theoretical figure. The money should actually be saved in the beneficiary’s account.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Nel

            The question was how much I had spent and saved between those dates and I calculated it like that…
            The amount of money saved on the account is actually way more because he received money before and after…

            • Kay Derochie

              Dear Nel,

              That makes sense.

              Sincerely,
              Kay

  • Nel

    If I am going to use just a portion of my toddler’s SSI to pay our rent or utilities, how do I do this? Should I withdraw the money? transfer it to my bank account? How can I prove this money was used for that?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Nel,

      One way would be to write a check off your child’s account directly to the landlord and to the utility companies. If you are paying part of each bill with other funds, just mail in two checks to cover the total cost.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Nel

        Can I purchase the checks with his SSI money?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Nel,

          Yes, because the checks are for the SSI recipient’s account and to manage the SSI recipient’s benefits.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Karla

    Hi, my daughter is almost 17 and autistic and has a seizure disorder. She just started receiving disability and I had to set up a special account for her back pay. I am not very clear on what it can be used for. I went through a divorce last year and cannot afford the vehicle that I have now and it is going to be repossessed any day. I myself have an auto-immune disease and am only working part time and have applied for disability myself to help supplement my income. I need to put a down payment on a used vehicle that I can afford the monthly payments on. Obviously I need a vehicle to work, take my children to school, and to get my daughter to all of her doctor’s appointments. Am I allowed to use part of this money as a down payment on a new (used) vehicle before our current vehicle is repossessed and we are left with nothing?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Karla,

      I suggest that you make a written request to purchase a used car with the benefits in your daughter’s Dedicated Account based on the need for transportation for her to get medical care and on its being income producing property because it gets you to work. Explain the situation with your current more valuable car. You might also voluntarily turn your car back to the dealer so that you do not have a repossession in your credit history.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Mom2013

    Hi, my son is disabled and receives supplemental security income. I am his representative payee for his funds. My husband and I are purchasing our first home and I am wondering since a portion of his ssi can be used towards shelter needs if our lender will take his ssi into consideration?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Mom2013,

      I think that the lender will consider the SSI funds as income for the loan if your son’s name is put on the title. The lender can tell you.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Theresa

    Can i use the dedicated account to purchase my son a new computer for school. He is home schooled. His computer quit on him today.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Theresa,

      You have to get permission from Social Security to use the money for that educational expense; however, permission should be granted because education will be the foundation for any rehabilitation program when he is older. Get written approval.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Nel

    My autistic toddler started receiving SSI right after my husband was Court removed from our home due to Domestic Violence more than a year ago. I have used this money for his needs like diapers, toiletry items, clothes, toys, comfort items and his necessities like a bed, sheets, toddler/items in general, etc., but due to my economic situation (not working, lacking resources) I also used this money to pay for our rent full at least 3 times and also paid the internet and electric bills a couple of times during this time lapse. (The first checks I think were retroactive, so it was a larger amount).
    I recently read that at some point I will be ask to provide proof of how the money has been spent, and I worry this will be a problem because I might have just taken portions of it every month or something like that?
    Also, since I don’t have a car, I mainly purchase all of his needs online, so there are tons of transactions to different sellers… Amazon, eBay, Walmart, Kmart, etc. Do I have to provide a receipt for each item purchased? How detailed is the proof I will need to provide?

    I am really overwhelmed since I am not sure what is allowed and what is not…
    How to appropriately utilize the money in a more organized way?
    What % can I use to pay for rent and bills?
    Also, is it ok for to also purchase his preferred food and snacks with this money and I guess keep the receipt.

    • Nel

      I am sorry to ask so many questions… I am an immigrant and have no knowledge about any of this since we don’t have it in my home country…

      I also would like to ask if I have to report getting tax money.

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Nel,

        Income tax refunds are not countable income. If you save the money, it will count as a resource the month following the month you receive it. You can have $2,000 in assets. If you have more than $2,000, the excess counts toward your child’s $2,000 limit.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

        • Nel

          Thank you for your response… I didn’t know about the $2,000 limit… Now I worry because I think there was a month in which the total on his account was $2,100 because they deposited his money and some purchased transactions hadn’t gone through yet.

          So I can’t save the tax money or my child loses his SSI?

          • Kay Derochie

            Dear Nel,

            If you can show that the checks were written before the first of the month, they might determine that he was not over the limit. If your son was over the limit in one month, he would be overpaid only in one month. Keep in mind that you can have $2,000 and your son can have $2,000. If you are over, the excess will count toward your son’s limit. You can spend the money to by a irrevocable burial policy of up to $1,500 on your son or yourself and the policy will not count toward the resource limit.

            Sincerely,
            Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Nel,

      Your child’s SSI is being paid foremost to provide him with food and shelter, so it is okay to pay rent and utilities with his benefits. Paying the Internet bill is more questionable but because you are using it to shop for his needs, that is probably okay, too.

      Documentation of expenses for a minor who lives of you is less than other situations. Just do the best you can. For Internet purchases, print a copy of each invoice at the time you make the purchase. Payment of credit card bills with the child’s money should be limited to charges for things for him.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Gretchen

    Hi i just wanna ask something in regards of my sons saving that he received monthly as well..even im receiving also as a survivor and im a payee of my sons account..the last time that i reported and this times amount it wont match..because of since his dad past away i used some of his savings for house care,monthly payment for car..even im working and at the same time receiving but its not enougj because of my monthly personal bills as well were i used my own..and we used also some of his money to buy ticket when we went off island just to relax..just to move on after my husband passed away…he still have savings but like what i said i used some of it because of our monthly needs as well..and because of were not approved of SNAP..i need some advice please…

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Gretchen,

      If the savings is not in a Dedicated Account for a minor child, using his savings for some of the things you mentioned is probably fine. Just include those items on the accounting. Your son lives in the house so using some of his money for house care is probably okay. If you use the car for his transportation, that is okay, too. And it is reasonable to use some for his portion of the cost of the trip.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • ConcernedAunt

    My 17 year old nephew receives SSI benefits as child support due to his mother being on disability, his dad (my brother) has been receiving these benefits. In December my nephew relocated to live with me in order to complete his high school education and get a better start. My question is shouldn’t my brother be forwarding those funds for my nephew’s expenses? At this point we have only received one months worth of benefits and my brother seems perfectly content to keep the funds while not contributing anything to his son’s care. Is there anything my nephew can do to change this situation? My husband and I are happy to help him get his life back on track but it is very expensive to feed and clothe a teenager and there are some medical bills pending for him as well.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Concerned Aunt,

      Yes, your brother should be forwarding the Social Security dependents (not SSI) benefits to you for your nephew’s care. You can go to Social Security and apply to be his payee because he is in your physical care.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Katie

    My fiancé eight months ago purchased a car but he has a representative payee who lived in another state. The car dealership scratched out the payees name and went forward with letting him purchase the car….is there a way that this contract can be Voided out knowing he has impulse buying issues that is why he has a representative payee? I just became his representative payee so I would like to get this matter figured out if I could…..

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Katie,

      Your question is a legal question that does not directly involve Social Security. I suggest that you consult with an attorney about the validity of the contract and the issue of the document with the payee scratched out.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • BJL

    I’m representative payee for my elderly sister. Because her expenses were high during the past year, I did not pay her portion of the Sec 8 rent. Now the landlord is evicting her and asking for the back rent. Am I liable for that rent?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear BJL,

      I suggest that you get legal advice regarding your personal liability. Also, perhaps someone else should be your sister’s payee because you did not guard her well being by prioritizing paying for her shelter before anything else.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • I am the payee for my two minor children who receive SSI and Medicaid. I was told Wednesday morning after a simple inquiry I had about something else that I better be back in this coming Monday morning with the last two years of tax returns in hand, proof of how we have used them, and where we spent it. I was also told by this employee that only people like her knows the rules, most who work up front don’t know anything. She implied that if I didn’t do what all she required that, she would take the SSI and Medicaid that my two medically disabled children get. I left there bawling….

    Now I have since learned that tax returns CANNOT be used against us as income for 12 months. I have read also where I am not required to report to SSI that we got a tax return.

    Am I required to report tax refunds and can they really “take everything away” from my kids?

    My son is having a major brain surgery in early June and this is the last thing I needed…..

    • I do have this prepared for Monday morning: “I am not frauding anyone with a tax return refund and nobody really can legally tell me what to do with that money. Nor can anyone legally tell me where to put it.

      Now, my grandmother did close that entire account and put all of the money that was in there into my checking. After looking into more things, I found out that only the tax return amount was rightfully ours. so I did pull that difference back out of my bank because I will not steal from my grandmother.

      If you see that difference, that is why because I will not steal from my grandmother anymore then I would knowingly fraud anyone else.”

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear CranioMom,

        I did not see this post when I responded to your first post, but please see my response as related to the tax refund. I am not sure what you are saying here, but two points.

        First, you can use the benefits any way you want as long as it is for your children. You can use your tax return and other income anyway you want, except if to give money away when it results in keeping your children within the resource limits. Giving away resources can also cause them to be temporarily ineligible because the money given away could have been used to support the family.

        Second, having your money mixed up with your grandmother’s is a problem because all the money in an account with your name on it as an owner or a co-owner is legally yours, even if ethically it is not. That means that if your grandmother’s money went into an account in your name, it will likely be income to you in the month of the deposit and a countable resource beginning with the following month and for some months following (the number depends on the amount of money you gave back to her).

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear CranioMom,

      Even if the children are overpaid for past months, that should not affect their eligibility for SSI or Medicaid now as long as they are below the resource limit now. (If they are overpaid, you can request collection through partial withholding and/or waiver of repayment.)

      Tax refunds are not countable income; however, if you save the money and carry it over to the following month, the amount of income carried over becomes a resource (asset) the following month and counts toward the SSI resource limit together with other countable assets. The limits are $2,000 for one parent in the household or $3,000 for two parents including step parents. Any excess the parents have above the limit is split and half counts towards each child’s $2,000 limit. What you need to show is that your children were not over the resource limit in any month or, if they were, when they dropped back below the limit. (You can cite the following SSA source that tax refunds are not income.)

      To head off any suspension of benefits, follow the requested action on Monday and submit everything you can gather by Monday for the two years requested. Take proof of the amount of the refunds (either a check stub or your federal and state tax returns, your bank statements and the children’s bank statements for the month (or months) following the receipt of each refund until your assets are low enough that the children’s assets are at or below $2,000 each.

      If the refunds did put the children over the limit for any month, make up a list of everything you used the money for as best as you can remember from the time the refunds were received to when they dropped below the limits again. If you can, provide verification with receipts, cancelled checks, debit entries on bank statements, etc. of any large uses of the refunds (big payment on a credit card, medical co-pays, or any large purchase), take those proofs. If you need more time to try to gather documentation, politely say so and ask for a couple weeks because of the length of time that has passed.

      One last consideration: If part of the refund was of an Earned Income Tax Credit or certain other credits, that portion of the refund is excluded from counting as a resource. The reference from SSA’s regulations is SI 01130.676. You can view this at https://secure.ssa.gov/apps10/poms.nsf/lnx/0501130676.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • CranioMom

        The account was in my grandmother’s name only. I didn’t know the amount in there till it was closed then it was after that, I returned all but our current tax return amount because we had nothing left of last year’s.

        Our tax refund did include the EIC and CTC.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear CranioMom,

          If the account was in your grandmother’s name only, then the account does not have to be declared. However, you keep saying your returned money to your grandmother so you must have had some sort of access to it.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

      • CranioMom

        For the years we have dealt with SSI, I have always reported that we got a tax refund as I was supposed to. This was the first year we had anyone hold it for us for a short time. It was also the first year we ever got in trouble for anything…. I thought that once it was reported, we could do whatever with it.

        I have learned a hard lesson…. I have told my husband from now on starting next tax season, we will open a totally different bank account for JUST tax refunds, and that way anything and everything from those returns has a paper-trail to back it up with. It’s sad when everything from medical bills to toilet paper has to be proven to the government….

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear CranioMom,

          Keeping your money separate from other people’s is a very good idea when SSI benefits are involved. SSI is a public needs-based assistance program. Accordingly, to receive benefits you exchange some of your privacy for the privilege of receiving financial assistance.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Tilly

    Hello there – my son has been receiving social security survivor benefits for whom I am the representative payee. This is from his father that passed away – I have remarried.

    He is 19 1/2 and is still receiving the benefits due to the fact that he is has a disability.

    He does live at home, and is able to manage his own money – I would like to have his benefits go directly to him in his own account. I do not feel he need to have me as a representative payee. His disability is heart related and does not interfere with his cognitive ability to handle his money. How do I go about doing that?

    I cannot seem to reach anyone, and he and I have each tried to create accounts for ourselves (individually) via the SS website – there is always an error.

    Thank you very much!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tilly,

      You and your son should go to a Social Security office, where he can apply to be his own payee and you can make a statement supporting his application. Both of you should state on the forms that your son’s disability is cardiac and does not affect his cognition or judgement. If Social Security questions this, you can have his physician complete an SSA-787 supporting his financial capability.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Nelly

    I am currently not able to work and have been paying the rent and bills with saved money and help from my family.
    Is it ok to pay part of the rent or one of the bills with my child’s SSI?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Nelly,

      Your child is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to first provide for her shelter and food; so, yes, it is appropriate to spend part or even most of her money for food and housing while using some for clothing, school supplies and activities, and other needs. As you describe your finances, depending on the amount of your savings, you and she might qualify for SNAP (formerly called food stamps).

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Nelly

    My toddler seems to have allergies, has to have his tonsils and adenoids removed because of the constant congestion and might have asthma.
    Is it ok to use his SSI benefits to purchase a new H.E.P.A. Filtered Vacuum since the one I have is just a regular cheap stick vacuum and we live in a wall to wall carpeted apartment?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Nelly,

      I would say, yes, you can use your son’s benefits to buy a device to keep his environment cleaner to help his respiratory system.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Anon

    I am a single mother of 3. Two 11 year olds and a 17 year old. The two 11 year olds receive SSI, we have one vehicle but as my 17 year has a job it’s impossible for us both to work at the same times. Is there anyway to get her a vehicle? She can make her own payments, I just need to put the car in my name because she’s underage.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Anon,

      Your resource limit is $2,000; each of your two disabled children have a resource limit of $2,000. The equity value (value less amount owed) of the least valuable vehicle will count toward your $2,000 limit. If your other countable resources and the car’s value puts you over the resource limit, the excess will be split between your two disabled children and count toward their $2,000 limits.

      For example, if with the equity value of the second car, your resources reached $4,000, you would have $2,000 excess resources and $1,000 would count toward each disabled child’s $2,000 limit. In this example if the children did not have other resources, the second car would not affect their eligibility.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Anna

        My daughter currently receives ssi benefits from her father. He does not live with us. I received a call this evening from him stating that the laws have changed and since she does not live with him she will no longer receive the monthly benefits. Is there any truth to this?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Anna,

          Your child’s father is misinformed. Your daughter’s benefit can continue to be paid. If you are not her payee already, go to your local Social Security office and apply to receive her benefits in your name because she lives with you. It might be good to take proof of relationship with you such as her birth certificate and your own photo I.D. as well as school records or other proof she lives with you.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • AnonK

            Hello,

            My mom is my payee for SSI benefits. My case however goes back for a few years and that required a large back pay. I know that you can get an extension on the first installment of proper documentation is brought in. My mom is thinking of purchasing a house closer to where the college that I will be attending is so that I do not have to live on campus, something I am not comfortable with due to my disabilities. We brought in a copy of the contract on a property to ask for additional funds, and they were saying that I had to be on the contract and the loan for the house, however I’m only 18, I have no credit to be approved for a mortgage and since my income is SSI, and my mom is the rep payee, the mortgage lender states that it is still considered my moms income. According to the social security website, additional funds can be asked from the back pay if there will be a future debt/need such as future medical equipment or the purchase of a home. How can I go about appealing the local offices decision on the denial of release of funds.

            • Kay Derochie

              Dear AnonK,

              Have your mom put your name on the loan application and on the title of the house. Then have her reapply for an advance on the back pay. The bank is incorrect in saying that your SSI benefit is your mother’s income; it is not. The SSI is your income. If necessary, get Social Security to write up a note saying so.

              Sincerely,
              Kay

  • ladyluck

    I have had my grandson since birth he collects off of my husband ssdi I am his payee we moved changed husbands address not gransons thought when changed it would do his. just found out it dint and now thay want me to prove were his money went for a year.i know longer have these recites. what can I do .please let me know all money goes to take care of him

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ladyluck,

      Start out explaining that your grandchild has been living with you and that you didn’t realize that his address had not been changed. (Perhaps you can get some school records to prove his address after the move.) If they accept that statement, you may not have to file the detailed report. If you still have to, fill out the form to the best of your ability based on memory and bank records. If asked for receipts explain the situation. Also be sure to get your grandson’s address changed.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Brittney

    Hi . I recieve survival benefits on my son since his father passed away in June of 2014 . however I didn’t no I was to keep the receipts so therefore my questions is will I be in trouble for something I didn’t non? I use it for rent ,food ,clothes he needs, transportation etc.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Brittney,

      If your child lives with you, you may not be asked for receipts. I suggest that you start keeping a log of how the benefits are used. Record the date and amount and use for items that the child may only pay part of, for example, for rent, food, utilities, etc. Anything that is purchased specifically for him, keep the receipts.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Ms.Baker

    I was approved in September 2105 and turn in all information needed on Oct 23rd and on Oct 26th I faxed banking information into office Oct 29th turned in banking information for my son account .I gotten a call on 0ct 31st from the manager stating I did not show up for my appointment and I told her that I was there and that I turned in all my information that was needed to move forward with his case as well I have left more than five voicemail massages for the case worker no reply as of today I called the toll free hot line and they said that He was approved but now its being reviewed and it could be turned into a no also she had the wrong date for my appointment on file and did not tell me why would they say no after he was already approved was really rude to me wondering what should I do next to find out what is really going on with his case it will be two weeks since appointment date on this coming friday and the worker has not put nothing in the system as of yet

    • Ms.Baker

      Never mind the case worker input case information in system on the fourth everything is working out just waiting for award letter to come in the mail.Was able to get letter of proof of income already.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Ms. Baker,

      In order for me to offer a suggestion, I need more information. How did the manager leave things at the end of the call? What were you told would happen? Did she accept what you were saying as true?

      Thanks,
      Kay

      • Andrew

        I am my daughters payee and recently received her first installment. My wife and I used that to pay off our over due bills so we could still have a roof over our heads. We also bought our daughter some much needed clothing and other necessities. We then found out our electric was going to be shut off and went to ssa to see about getting the amount needed for that since we did not have enough to pay it. We saved all the receipts but still can not count for $229.27. We believe its a receipt fir the tires on the car but we can’t find it. What will happen if we can’t show where that amount went? We are going to ssa tomorrow with what we do have.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Andrew,

          You will have been to Social Security by now. If you were asked for the tire receipts, go to the place you bought them and try to get a duplicate receipt.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Hannah Bearden

    I just recently turned 18. I have been in foster care my whole life just about. I receive survivors benefits, because my father passed away when I was only 3. However none of this money has ever been used for my needs. Is there anything I can do about this ? I am 18 and I have no start in life now that everyone has abuse the income from my father.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Hannah,

      If your benefits were used by your foster parents to pay for food, clothing, school supplies, haircuts, toilet articles, medical co-pays, transportation, etc., the the money has been used for your needs. If this did not happen, then you can report the misuse to the Social Security Administration.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Tina

    My grandson is in mine and my husband’s custody. My husband is the payee for my grandson and we are going through a divorce. My husband said that he had to setup a designated account for our grandson’s monthly payments from SSI and it can’t be touched. However, he doesn’t always tell the truth. Everything that I have read states that only back pay needs to have a designated account but monthly SSI payments don’t have to go into that designated account and can be used for living expenses. Is this correct? Please explain what needs to go to a designated account and can’t be touched and what doesn’t need to go into that account.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tina,

      Current monthly benefits are not supposed to go into a dedicated account; they are supposed to be used for the child’s current needs. If the child is going to remain with you, you need to apply to be his payee and to receive his benefits to care for him.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • donna

    My question is, my daughter is getting her monthly checks ive went down and ask for a larger payment do to we have a bedbug issue in our current house, the landlord knows of the situation, i was told to make a list of things that needed to be replaced and bring to the office ive done that, then i filled out a paper explaining the situation, my landlord has not even made an attempt to have the home treated for the problem, can i use the dedicated money to move and replace all furnishing?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Donna,

      It is possible that you might be able to get the money released from the Dedicated Account for the special purpose of moving to an insect-free apartment and replacing anything that cannot be cleaned. Go to Social Security again and make an amended request, stating that your landlord is doing nothing about the bedbugs so you need to move to provide a healthy place for your daughter to live.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • anonymous

    Hi, I’ve apparently been receiving ssi checks every month for the past ten years, but I’ve only recently found out about a month ago that I even had ssi. I’m 17 and my mother is my payee and recieves everything. I’ve always been denied even basic necessities or when I asked for money for such simple things as a haircut for as long as I can remember. Is there anything I can do about this?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Anonymous,

      I suggest that you go to the Social Security Administration and discuss the situation with them to get their advice on what you can do about the use of the money. However, keep in mind that your mother is providing a place to live and food, which may be paid for or partially paid for with all or nearly all of your benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • hello Shannon,

    I am currently my fathers payee, but I was just laid-off. Will my fathers SSI be considered as my income? I was thinking of applying for unemployment insurance.

    Thank you
    Adriana

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Adriana,

      Your father’s SSI benefits are not your income and will not affect any aspect of your finances.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • frances

    I am the pay of my to younger cousin 11 & 7 they live with their mom but I assist her with groceries and paying some of the bills but she also receive an adoption check for them for almost $1000 she is constantly asking for extra money for gas for the car or spending money for her to buy restaurant food or for activities for her and some of her nice and nephews and if I don’t agree she threatened to remove me from being the payee. She is horrible with money I recently found out the she is behind in the bills and she had not paid the morgage in a year
    But she has recently refinaced and is back on track. Can she do this without having a valid reason?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Frances,

      I assume that you are asking whether the children’s mother can ask to have you removed as payee. She can ask; whether or not the change is made will depend on what Social Security thinks is in the best interest of the children. I suggest that you go talk to Social Security and explain that you are refusing to use the children’s money for anything other than their personal needs, a portion of the mortgage and the utilities and that the mother pressures you for money for her own use. Ask that a notation be made to each of the children’s records that you want to go on record about refusing to use the money for her or other children.

      A side note: If the adoption assistance is being paid for the disabled children, it may or may not be countable income for determining SSI eligibility, depending on the program under which it is being paid. As the children’s payee, it is your responsibility to report this income if it has not already been reported at application or at the last redetermination.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Lor

    Hello. I am here with question.
    My son first got his SSI when he was born as very preemie. He first starting with $30 in the NICU. When he discharge, i sent report in the mail and seem like SSI dont get the mail. It’s take me 4 month or 5 months to finally get the report update of his discharge. Right now he got SSI over $2000 into 1 month.

    I want to know is this money from his SSI count as Dedicated Account or as a monthly normal SSI money?

    I make a call to SSI and ask what can be spent and not be spent. This person said I can buy him whatever he want: clothe, food, pay rent and the way he answer me is like he is rushing.

    I am his payees and I don’t want to make any mistake that lead to trouble like jail just for spent things for my son or pay money back because i spent thing for him.

    • Lor

      oh one more thing.

      If i spent my son SSI money for his need, can I just use his bank card ( where his SSI money put in ) in the store or i have to withdraw his SSI money into cash before spent?

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Lor,

        You can use the bank card. Be sure to keep receipts so you have a record of spending for your annual representative payee report.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Lor,

      The large SSI payment that your child got was an adjustment in benefit amount and not back pay on a new claim, so my understanding is that the money does not need to be deposited to a dedicated account and can be used to care for your son in any way, as the Social Security representative said. However, keep in mind that there is a $2,000 resource limit so you may want to spend down below $2,000 on things needed for your child before the beginning of the next month.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Lor

        I understand that I will need to spent under $2000 as for the resource limit before the beginning of new month.

        1. What happen to the money that have not spent? Are they going to add with the new month money to spent for the month?

        2. I hear that some people withdraw money before they spent and save the receipts to show proof. Is this the right way to do in SSI or ( can only be spent using the SSI bank card in store) or either way is right way to do?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Lor,

          As long as you save receipts, it does not matter whether your use the bank card or pay cash. Only money received in the prior month counts toward the $2,000 resource limit. Therefore, any SSI received in one month (for example, September) that is not spent in the month of receipt will first count as a resource on October 1.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Kyzer

    Hi, my mother is currently my payee and we don’t get along at all. I wanted to know, if I tried to change my payee to my long-term girlfriend whom I’m moving in with, could I do it without them telling my mother until it’s done? I had mentioned it to my mother before and she completely flipped out, and I’d really like a yes or no answer from SSI without her involved. I’m sure if my mother was involved in the process she’d surely try to sabotage it because she’s a control freak.

    • Kyzer

      And will they inform her that I tried if they deny me? Frankly even if she found out I tried she’d go crazy.

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Kyzer,

        Please see my prior reply to you. SSA most likely would not notify your mother if they decide not to change the payee, but you can’t be absolutely sure of that.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kyzer

      Also keep in mind that we’re both adults. I’m 30 and she’s 36.

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Kyzer,

        Please see my prior reply.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Kyzer,

      I suggest that you and your girlfriend go to Social Security together for her to apply to be your payee. Take a statement with you regarding why your girlfriend would be a better payee, such as you will be living together so she will know more about your needs. Be sure to mention how long your relationship is. In many cases, the current payee is not notified until Social Security makes a decision to approve a payee change. However, that is not guaranteed and SSA could potentially ask your mother for her input.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Anthony b jr

    Hi my name’s Anthony I have a question for my daughter I’m a single father and applied for ssi for my daughter. I received a dedicated account for her and I’m wondering if I am able to use the benefits they owe us on a vehicle I have a hard time getting her to appointments etc. And is the money withdrawlable for car dealership that would only take cash up front?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Anthony,

      Withdrawals for medical expenses can be made from dedicated accounts so it seems possible that you could get approval from the Social Security Adminstration to buy a car to get your daughter to the medical appointments. I recommend that you request permission from SSA before making the withdrawal. I would think that you could pay cash for the car; however, be sure to get a receipt to prove use of the money and, of course, to protect yourself.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Anthony b jr

        Ok thank you for your help so much I really appreciate it.

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Anthony.

    • michelle

      My son got one installment of ssi it’s been 7 months hasn’t got his next do i have ask for it can i buy him a trailer with backpay

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Michelle,

        If you are referencing a residential mobile home that he is going to live in, you can use the money for that kind of purchase, but the trailer should be put in his name as owner.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  • Betty

    My sister in law has a disabled child age 5. He has severe developmental delays. He cannot talk and has development of a 9 month old in most areas. My question is based on the fact she refuses to get therapy for him. He needs speech, ot, and pt. Who or how can I report this to? CPS has been involved with no results. To me, this is neglect. He may get better with therapy but we will not know if he doesn’t get it.

    • Betty

      Can the at least assign another person to be payee?

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Betty,

        Please see my prior response. I assume from your present question, that the child is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. If so, you might be successful in becoming the child’s payee based on your assertions that the mother is not securing appropriate medical treatment, but if you do, I am not sure that would grant you medical power of attorney or other authority to make medical decisions for the child. To do that you might have to go to court to become the child’s guardian. Again, it seems that you need legal advice about the situation.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Betty,

      I suggest that you discuss this with an attorney who specializes in family law. Perhaps such an attorney would be able to identify resources.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • gissel

    Can I be my own payee since im 17 and have a child of 2 yr old?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Gissel,

      You can try applying to be your own payee, but typically minors are not paid directly unless they are emancipated. That said, you can file a payee application and get a formal decision.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Sarah Anne Morarie

    Hello, I am writing because I would like to know if I have to report my wages or if my mom does who is my payee. I thought I could report some wages from what I had read on the Internet though I think she is primarily responsible for this. I am not a minor and I am my own guardian if it matters. I also would like to know what I need to do beyond getting my doctor to say I am competent to manage my money for me to become my own payee. I get the entire check transferred to my account and I pay for my bills and needs. I need to know what proof I would have to provide to show that I am capable of becoming my own payee and if i should l manage my check from ssi and work for a few months before I make a request for myself to be my own payee.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Sarah,

      You or your mother needs to report your wages right away because they may affect the amount of SSI you are eligible for. At the same time, take a statement from your doctor that you are capable of managing your benefits and another statement from your mother that she has been turning all the money over to you and you have already been managing it.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • melissa

    I’m a family of 4 my son is getting ssi benefits I just purchased a car for us cuz I didn’t have transportation will that affect my child’s benefits.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Melissa,

      If you paid for the car yourself, owning one vehicle will not affect your son’s SSI benefits.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Letisha Hudgins

    I got my son dedicated account opened. But why have they not been sending his monthly ssi? I been having to use his dedicated money for his needs!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Letisha,

      You need to stop using his dedicated account for regular monthly needs. It can be used only for the items listed in the dedicated account instructions. Contact Social Security right away to follow up on getting the monthly benefits started.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Anonymouse

    I am the representative payee for my 7-year-old autistic/learning disabled/developmentally delayed son. I have structured activities for him every day, but also during the day I give him some down time to watch a little bit of television that he enjoys, fluff stuff like Power Rangers but also some educational programs. Our TV just broke down. Am I allowed to purchase a new one for him with the SSI money, or no? I don’t personally watch a lot of television and I wouldn’t want SSA to get the wrong idea and think it was for me.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Anonymous,

      If you are referring to your son’s monthly SSI benefit, you can go ahead and purchase the television and put the cost under education or entertainment when you complete the payee reporting form. If you are questioned, you can explain the same to the Social Security Administration (SSA) as you explained to me. If you are referring to SSI back pay that is kept in a Dedicated Account, you will need permission from SSA. You might be able to get permission if your son’s physician thinks that his watching television is therapeutic and is willing to make a statement that it is. As such you might get permission as a medical treatment expense.

      If this doesn’t work out and you are not already using your son’s benefits to pay his share (half with two in the household; a third with three) of rent or mortgage, power, heat, water/sewer, garbage and food, you could increase the amount of his contribution to expenses and then use your own money that is freed up to replace the TV.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • latoya moses

    I am the Guardian of my 17 year old sister. I am also her rep payee she gets social security because our father passed. I was recently laid off because our company closed is her income considered as mine? Will her income exclude me from getting my unemployment?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Latoya,

      Your sister’s income is not yours. You are responsible for using it to support her (provide shelter, food, clothing, school supplies, hygiene items, medical care, etc., plus recreation if any is left over.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Tammy

    My apologies, you are correct. I’m the representative payee for my 6yr old daughter, since I work I do not receive survivor benefits. When I received the pamphlet on being a “payee” it was vague and I knew that it couldn’t address all gray areas, but the perspective it gives is that the money that is given to my daughter from Social Security Survivor benefits is under scrutiny even though I am now a single widowed parent now having to provide for my child on my own. If she wants to attend camp, join an after school sport, go to an amusement park or any kind of amusement period, there isn’t really anything out there that I’ve seen that gives more definitive parameters on what is or isn’t allowed. I’m so new to this as he just passed months ago, I suppose I feel like I need to ask permission for anything I feel is beneficial to my child with the social security she is receiving from the death of my husband, her father, it’s already an unfortunate loss. Providing shelter and using some of those funds to do so is definitely a stress reliever in our situation, as well as child care while I work. I appreciate any info or tips you could provide on making sure I am not penalized for using the social security benefits in a way they would deem “inappropriate”. Thank you!

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tammy,

      If you use your daughter’s money first for her basic needs of shelter, food, clothing, medical costs, and school supplies, etc., then it is completely appropriate to use some of the money for after-school activities, summer camp, and a reasonable amount of recreation. It is also okay to save some of the money for when she is older and the cost of her care and extra-curricular activities are likely to increase. The overview is not to misuse her money by using it for yourself or someone else and to be sure her core needs are met.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Tammy

    My husband of 20 years passed away, leaving me and our 6yr old child on our own. I work a full time job. Because of my full time job status, the SSI payments do not come in my name, they come in my daughter’s name. I am the Representative Payee for her. Being a single widow now, caring for a 6yr old, am I allowed to use the SSI payments that come to her for child care and part of our rent? Going from 2 incomes and now 1 income, obviously caring for my child is more difficult in terms of finances. Am I required to keep track of her payments as mentioned in previous questions? Your help is most appreciate.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Tammy,

      I am not sure that I understand your situation correctly. I think that you are saying that your six-year-old child for whom your are representative payee receives Social Security survivor benefits (not SSI, which is Supplemental Security Income paid to disabled minor children) and that you do not receive survivor benefits because you are working and earning too much. My reply is based on that understanding; if it is incorrect, let me know. Using some of your child’s benefits to pay rent, thus providing her with shelter, and to pay for child care for her while you work is appropriate use of her money.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Haley

    My fiance (20 yoa) has been living with my mom, my dad, my sister and I for about a year. His truck(in his mom’s name) is broke in my yard and his father (payee) tells him he should save money to fix it, but he has all of his money. Ty only gets around $100 a week, sometimes less, and that is used for laundry soap, toilet paper, tobacco, and whatever else is needed. When my family takes a trip his parents tell him he is not allowed to have any money because it is almost out (middle of month usually) because his bills were high. At Bluegrass he is paying around $200/month for a cheap smartphone and his parents will not drop his line although it is in their name. They tell him it will cost $300 or more to drop it. I believe his parents are drawing food stamps off of him for their own use. Here at my house, my mom provides food and shelter for Ty. He wants a different payee. Could my mom or I be his payee? I am wishing I can because we are planning to get a house together once I graduate high school in May. I am 18. Is there a certain age you have to be to become a payee? What should we do?

    • Haley

      His father does not pay my mom for rent for him. When Ty buys food or anything else needed, they jump on him because he is “wasting” money. They believe we are taking it all when in reality we believe it is them.

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Haley,

        Please see my response to your previous post. Ty, you, and your mother all need to make statements to the Social Security Administration (SSA) of what the situation is. Also, Ty might talk with his doctor regarding whether he is capable of receiving his benefit check directly. It sounds as if he is managing $00 a month of it himself anyway.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Haley,

      You can apply to be payee, but it is more likely that your mother would be approved both because of your young age and because she is providing shelter and food. I suggest that your mother apply to be payee for your fiance and that your fiance and she ask for an accounting from the current payee. With regard to the phone, most carriers will provide a phone credit to pay off a prior carriers contract. (Note that if your fiance is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and his benefit is more than $488 a month he likely is overpaid because he is getting free food and housing.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • alisha

    My son just received his first ssi monthly payment. He is a minor and I’m representative payee. All of our bills are directly withdrawn from my husbands account so how should I go about paying bills. I cant pay 1/4 from my sons account and 3/4 from my husbands.
    Also… I was told I didn’t have to keep receipts for the monthly money that is spent, but I wanted to make sure. So do I have to keep receipts?
    And if cash was taken out and spent on groceries how should I record that?

    • alisha

      Also wanted to ask….. Does a movie (DVD) he wants count as recreational? I didn’t know if I could use the money for his movie or not. I am just about terrified to touch the money because I don’t want to do something wrong.

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear Alisha,

        Please see my previous response. Yes, a DVD would be entertainment. You can pay for entertainment as long as his primary needs are met.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Alisha,

      I suggest that you have a checking account for your son and write a check off your son’s account to your husband’s account for your son’s monthly contribution for rent, utilities, and food. Set up with the bank to receive a paper bank statement with photocopies of all the checks written as a record of the money transferred. (There will probably be a small monthly fee.) Keep receipts for all other expenditures for your son that are made with the remainder of the money in his account, such as clothing, school supplies, medical co-pays, and entertainment.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • alisha

        Ok, thanks for the advice. Is it ok to draw cash out as long as you keep record of what you did with it?

        His money is going into my bank account. I have had this account for years. Would you suggest opening another account for him and having his money deposited into it?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Alisha,

          Yes, as representative payee, it is okay to withdraw cash as long as you have a record of how it is spent. You should not have your son’s money going into your account and co-mingled with yours. You should have an account set up with the title “you son’s name by your name, representative payee.” To do this, you need to take the approval letter or some other correspondence about your son’s benefits that is addressed to you (“your name for your son’s name”). Then give the bank account information to Social Security so that the direct deposit can be changed. And, ye, you should transfer his money out of your account into his. Keep a copy of the transfer documents (withdrawal and deposit) so you can show it is not outside income being deposited.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

      • alisha

        If I do open another account should I transfer the funds he’s already received into that account? Or just keep his money in my old account and use it from there?

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Alisha,

          Please see my response to your prior post.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • crystal

    Hi Kay, I find it so hard to inderstand why the need for a dedicated account. Regardless of how long it took the SSI to complete the determination it still doesnt change his disability. My son has ADHD and Anxiety issues. We live in a neighborhood that has recent and frequent gang activity and he has no yard to play in, put a swingset in, or anything of the sort. I dont allow him to go outside in the front much because we live right in front of the problem house. I really wished someof this money could have been used for a down payment on our own home in a safer neighborhood so he could pkay outside or in a backyard. But I guess this is out of the question? So I guess keeping him inside with little time outside is theraputic? Are there any instances this could help in the aid of getting him a place he can actually have a normal outside childhood?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Crystal,

      Telling your story to your congressman/woman and senator and asking them to take a look at the law could perhaps change things in the long run.

      In the meantime, you might talk to your son’s therapist and psychiatrist to see whether they agree that it would be good for your son’s mental health and perhaps eventually get him off disability benefits if he lived where he could safely go outside. If they agree, have them write a letter to that effect. Then make a written request to Social Security to have funds released based on a medical need to move. (Money can be released to build wheelchair access on a home and the like, so there’s an outside chance you might be successful.) Do you research first on how much of the dedicated money you would need and whether you could qualify for a loan and make the payments and pay property taxes and insurance. If buying a house won’t work financially, research the cost of a rental in a safer neighborhood and request moving and move-in costs.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • hallie

    Hi, I am the guardian of my 7 yr. Old nephew. He gets money from his father’s ssi (because both parents are disabled) Can I spend some of his money on buying myself prescription glasses (I can’t drive or do much else without them).

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Hallie,

      Unfortunately, you cannot use your nephew’s benefits to purchase glasses for yourself. If he lives with you, you can use part of his benefits to pay shelter and food costs. If you have not been doing so, that might free up some of your own money for the glasses.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • michael

    My name is Michael my father was my payee but after I turned 18 they found me ineligible for anymore benefits . My question is after they decide to stop my benefits does the money in the dedicated account do they take the remaining of the money out ?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Michael,

      If you had been approved for continuing Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits when you turned eighteen, the following rules would apply: The money would be transferred from your payee to you, but the money could be used only for education and job training and medical care.

      I do not know whether these rules apply when you are no longer disabled. I recommend that you go to a Social Security office to find out whether the use restrictions continue to apply and also to double check the money does not have to be returned. (I doubt that it does.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • GK

    Also, one more thing. Just received the back payment in paper check form. we haven’t set up a bank account yet. So does that mean my mom and I can just go cash it? Im so confused, the dude made it seem like this is my money to use as I see fit and now they sent me a check which seems I can just go cash. No booklet, no rules, no restrictions were ever mentioned. Help me so J know I can use it and not get in trouble.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear GK,

      Your mother could just cash the check, but it might be better to use it to open an account so that future benefits will be paid safely into the account. The only restriction is that the money be used for your needs. Your mother should have received some instruction on being a payee when she completed the paperwork to serve as payee. If not, you and she can read about the how she is to handle the money at http://www.ssa.gov/payee/ and at http://www.ssa.gov/payee/faqrep.htm#a0=4 Her (and your) other responsibility is to report any changes that would affect your payments. For Social Security that would be any work or medical recovery. For SSI, there are numerous changes that have to be reported. You can read about these in the article entitled “What Do I Have to Report to the Social Security Administration Once I Start to Get SSI” under the SSI tab on the top of every page on this website.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Jason

    My son receives SSI. I am self employed and have been paying myself a wage this year of a steady amount every month. My business has turned a profit for the year (yay!) but I am wondering how I report that to SSA, and when because I know it will reduce his benefit? I currently report my wages through the smartphone app every month. I won’t know the exact amount of my profit until my accountant does my return, but it is several thousands. Will that be income in the month I report it? Will I have to take that money out of my business or can I leave it in to pay myself during lean months? Thanks for your consideration

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jason,

      How your self-employment will be handled, specifically, whether the profit above your “wage” is countable income even if you don’t withdraw it from the business depends on how your business is set up–as a sole proprietorship or as some kind of corporation. If you are set up as a sole proprietor, it is likely that all your profit will count as income for last year prorated out over the twelve months in 2014. If you are trying to plan, I suggest that you make an appointment to speak with the claims representative to learn how your earnings will be handled.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • GK

    I recently just got approved for SSI, and have a back payment coming. I am an adult, and handle my money fine, but for some reason they requested a representative payee, which is my mom. So we have to get a joint dedicated account. Anyway, at the social security office the guy said I can pretty much spend the money on what I want. That they aren’t that worried about it since I am an adult. I will have extra money most likely once I cover needs, and I am very confused as to what I can buy. He didn’t say there was anything I couldn’t buy, or my representative payee couldn’t buy for me. but the internet is saying different. What’s the deal? I am stuck in the house all day because of my situation and disability. Can I buy a TV? a good tv? I asked the guy he said tv, whatever, its your money. I used to dj and that helps me distract, and I might return to doing if i get better, can i buy new dj equipment? Any kind of clothes? What about just little things that pop up? Can I pay my mom back for things she has bought me during this? past due bills? Nobody clarified any thing and they just acted like since I’m an adult they won’t really question anything. I don’t know. I don’t want to get in trouble or get my mom in trouble.

    • GK

      Also, I generally tithe 10% of anything I get to my church or a church run chairty. This is a religious practice for me. What are the rules regarding that in SSI. I would not feel right accepting the full SSI payment and/or back payment without tithing 10%. Am I allowed?

      • Kay Derochie

        Dear GK,

        Please see my reply to your previous post.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear GK,

      I need one clarification before I respond. I want to double check: were you approved for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability (SSDI) based on your work earnings or disabled adult child Social Security benefits on a parent’s earnings record or a combination of two?

      Thanks,
      Kay

      • GK

        It’s all based on my earnings, I believe. I am 26 so I am considered independent. The only thing is my SSI isn’t as big as it could be each month because I don’t pay rent and stuff because I live with my parents. But the Backpay is pretty large. The SSDI I know is mine and I can do whatever I want, but the SSI is the thing with the backpay and the dude was making it out to be that as long as my needs are met, the rest is my money. because I am an adult, even though my mom has to be the payee. (Which I need to go get fixed anyway, because I am very competent and I don’t know who told them I wasn’t, but I know my doctor will write a note saying I can handle my money) He basically was saying they don’t worry about how a payee uses the money if the person is an adult. I don’t know, I’m confused. Because I read these things on the internet that you have to report such and such and have restrictions, but I brought up buying a TV to the guy and dvd, games, whatever, and he was just like do whatever you want it’s your money.

        Also, he told us we have to make an account in me and my moms name, but the first check is coming as a paper check and that includes the backpay, so I don’t know if i can just cash that anyway.

        • GK

          o, and the SSI is based is based on assets and income, so needs and resources. Because I don’t have much stuff or income.

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear GK,

          Thank you for the clarification. Your benefits can be spent on your needs and wants. It can be spent on anything; but of course, housing,food, clothing, medical, dental, transportation, and other necessities should come first before entertainment and other pleasures. As payee, your mother’s responsibility is to see that those necessities are paid first before other uses of the money and possible keep a prudent reserve for future needs. She is also responsible for accounting for all the money to show that it was all spent or saved for you and not used for herself or anyone else. (Once it starts, if you start to pay rent or your share of household expenses, your SSI may go up.) I would expect that the first paper check will also come with your mother as payee. It as the bank account will likely read “your name by your mother’s name, representative payee.” If it is, only she can legally cash it.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Pearson

    My son became eligible for ssi is it true that will pay him back money?? Also hes a very minor child 4 years of age what can i possibly do with the money?? Can i clothes shop. And house shop?? It’s it wrong to purchase things that’s not for him. If its less then 30$ Will that be wrong?? Lastly how much shall be be getting at the age of 4.??

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Pearson,

      Your son’s SSI money can be spent only on him–his share of housing, utilities, and food. The rest should be spent on clothing, medical care, any training programs that might help improve his disability, etc. He will receive back pay to the month after the month of application. The amount he will receive will be based on his and his parent’s income, not on his age.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Yolanda

    Are there any financial institutions that let you open up a free dedicated account for SSI????

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Yolanda,

      I am sure that there are institutions that will provide free savings accounts with a certain minimum deposit or balance. Check with banks and credit unions in your local area.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Danielle Stokes

    I have a question. I am representative payee for my minor son. He has a dedicated account. I have used the account to cover items. I an concern because I have a couple of items I used the account for that in not sure they will cover. Any help will be appreciated.

    First. Recently the sheriff came to home demanding I pay property tax fron 4 years ago totally caught me off guard. He litterally gave me 24 hours to come up with the money or I was goung to face writ of execution. So of course I paid it .Also a week later I had traffic court I asked for extension for financial reason but was denied.so I had to kick. Out yet another $200 bucks at rent yime. This making Me $320 short on rent. I retained my receipts , but to prevent eviction I used the dedicated account to cover what I was short on rent. I saved my court receipt and receipts from sherriff also have copy of money order and receipt I made for the rent in the amount of $320. Will ssi see this is misapplication?

    Also my chikd struggles with reading he is about 2 grade levels behind. I hired a private tutor to assist him. He agreed to a rate of $60/ weeks for 10 weeks. I used dedicated account for this $600. Hsince this is a private tutor. What records should I keep to prove this is where the funds went?

    Lastly I used funds from account befor that was preapproved. I had excess funds on hand after purchase. I used it on other items like glasses and camp fees. Will using excess funds for these items be ok.

    Also I heard that ssi can remove payee responsibility if money is gound misused or missapplied. At what circumstance will this happen?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Danielle,

      Paying for a tutor for your son is an appropriate use the Dedicated Account funds. Request a bill from the tutor and keep proof of its payment in the form of a cancelled check, money order, or receipt from the tutor if you paid cash. The eyeglasses are an appropriate use. Educational and medical needs do not have to be pre-approved. If the camp is an educational camp, it might be allowable.

      You cannot pay the rent or your traffic fines with it. I suggest that you start gradually repaying the account from your own income because you are in violation of the law.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  • Amanda

    My best friends son draws SSI and they cut his check over $200 because they say his dad makes too much money. Can the Dad count his medical expenses as part of their monthly payments? Now they are requiring his dad’s pay stubs each month plus their monthly bills. It seems he (the dad) could count his medical
    bills.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Amanda,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments are calculated considering family income, not family expenses.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  • mychell

    I’m waiting on my appointment for an interview after I won a hearing for my daughter and I have 3 other kids one is already receiving Ssi but my other 2 are not will they be covered by Ssi to?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Mychell,

      Only your disabled children will be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If the other two children are disabled, you have to file individual applications for each.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  • Keyann

    Hi I recieve ssi for my son who is a minor. I currently have no other income but his ssi benifit. We are living with someone eles .I use most of it to pay shelter and food cost for where we live but he only receives 480.67 . Would they raise his benifit up and if they do what would I need to prove for them to do it?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Keyann,

      I suggest that you request a review of his living arrangements for possible increase if the amount of his check. Your son can receive a higher amount of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) if he is paying his share of shelter expenses or paying a flat rental amount for room (or room and board). If everyone buys food together, then your son has to pay his share of the household expenses and food to get the maximum amount. His share is the rent (or mortgage), utilities (excluding phone and cable) and food divided by the number of people in the household. If he buys his and your food separately from the others, then he only needs to pay his share of shelter expenses. If he isn’t paying his share, it is still possible that his check could increase somewhat if he is getting less in-kind (non-cash) support and maintenance that is now on record.

      Take a statement from the head of household regarding the amount your son contributes and when the contribution began and the number of people in the household. Also take proof of the shelter expenses (and food expenses if applicable).

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  • Linda J

    If I don’t recieve SSI benefits but I am awaiting monies from a lawsuit from a accident. Will my personal account affect my child’s benefits since im her payee?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Linda,

      If your child lives with you, your income and assets, including your bank account, are considered in determining whether your child is financially eligible for SSI. The money paid pursuant to the lawsuit is likely to count as income in the month you receive it. Any of the money left at the beginning of the following month will count toward the asset limit. Be sure to report the money when it is received and expect to repay the SSI paid for that month if the settlement is sizable. Note that some assets, such as burial policies and one car, are not countable assets.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  • Robin Frazier

    I am the parent of a minor child on SSDI….Does me getting unemployment affect his disability payments? What is the max we can make in income for a family of 2 adults and 2 children?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Robin,

      You say that your minor child is receiving SSDI, which is Social Security Disability benefits; however, minor children do not receive Social Security disability benefits. Disability benefits are available for minor disabled children under the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. I suggest that you double check which kind of benefits the child is receiving.

      If the benefits are SSI, then you must report your unemployment and all other family income to the Social Security Administration. They will calculate whether your unemployment is enough to affect your child’s benefits. If your child is receiving dependent benefits on a parent’s Social Security record, then you do not need to report the unemployment and your income will not affect your child’s benefits.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  • Evelyn

    Hello i have a question…i have a nephew that is 17 years of age,has a girlfriend that is having his baby on september.He has been residing with me temporary for the last 5 months.I talked with his mother about me being his payee because she has not met his needs.No matter what the circumstances are she will not help with his needs even when he did reside with her.She is lying to the ssi saying she is proviiding his needs.I am fustrated because i cannot no longer help with his needs except shelter and i need answers about what can he do or I for him.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Evelyn,

      You and your nephew need to go the Social Security Administration and make a formal statement about misuse of funds and you need to file an application to be his payee. If that doesn’t work and if your nephew is not receiving food stamps, I suggest that you and he go to the food stamp office and apply. Explain that you have been helping him, but can’t provide food any longer and that his payee isn’t turning over the money.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  • Neptune

    Hi my daughter is 5 months old with a trach we are waiting now for approval I stay at home all day and take care of her by myself day and night along with 2 other children who are not disabled my husband works, when I applied for SSI for our daughter the computer wouldn’t make me the payee my name wouldnt work so they made my husband the payee which is fine but if we’re approved my husband said he will give me the card since im home all day we have a nurse who stops by once a week for like 20 to 30 min we live together but he works everyday is this ok for me to take the card since i was originally gonna have my name on it???

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Neptune,

      You may want to get legal advice on the matter. Practically speaking, you will be able to use the card at an ATM, but not in a store because it is in your husband’s name. I suggest talking to Social Security again. It doesn’t seem logical that your name can’t be used as I assume you have a Social Security card in your name.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Neptune

        Hi it’s Neptune again my mom has sis because she has so many health problems but the lady st sis told me the computer won’t desperate my name fron her it’s stuck is how she described it she tried a few times I never had ssi

        • Neptune

          I’m sorry for the misspelling I meant to say my mom has SSI and can’t work due to so many health problems but the lady at SSI said for some reason the computer won’t separate my name from her it’s stuck together she try a few times

  • christin

    Both my twin son receive ssi and I am there payee. How much can I make in a month before it starts to reduce there ssi check

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Christin,

      I suggest that you review the articles on deemed income under the “SSI” tab on this website, http://www.disabilityadvisor.com for information about countable deemed income. Alternatively, you could talk with a Social Security claims representative to figure the amount.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  • Jessica Rabbit

    What happens if my daughter under 18 moves with her paternal grandmother for the summer? I already know that she I have to inform the SSA office so she can get a new representative payee, but will her grandmother have to report her income or will her income/resources not be countable since she is not her parent?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Jessica,

      If your daughter is definitely going to spend only the summer with her grandmother, then you do not need to change payees. You do need to give her grandmother money for her room and board and other needs. I suggest writing out an itemization of how the money is earmarked if some is to be sent for entertainment and personal care items–one copy for you and one for her grandmother. It would be okay to save some for school clothes and school supplies when she comes home in the fall.

      Your questions seem to indicate that your daughter is receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI). That means that you do need to report her summer living arrangements and to report how you will see your daughter’s needs are met over the summer (see paragraph above). To guard against a reduction in benefits, you need to either pay market value for room and board or pay your daughter’s share of shelter and food expenses. If there are two in the household, her share will be one-half of rent or mortgage and one-half of utilities (excluding phone) and food. (Three people equals a share of one-third, and so on.)

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  • delia

    I have a question. I have 2 kids with my ex boyfriend, we were not married but lived together for 5 years, we went our separate ways when our second child was born. He has a disability and therefore since he can’t pay child support the SSA sends me a monthly check for the kids. Since then I found out he bought a house and has married and is expecting another child. He is living with the mother of the child and providing his disability check for their household. My question is, once that child is born will my kid’s funds be reduced to contribute towards the new baby even though he is married to the mother and lives with them or is it only when the parents are divorced and or separated.

    Thank you

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Delia,

      All children of a disabled worker are potentially eligible for Social Security dependent benefits. Your children’s benefits will be reduced as son as the third child becomes eligible. The total amount being paid to your two children will be divided among the three children.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • delia

        Thank you for your reply Kay. I was under the impression that the income received by social security was because we are separated and he does not pay child support due to his disability. So his new son or daughter will enjoy the benefits of living with the father and the fathers income plus an additional income?

        Thank you

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Delia,

          Yes, that is true.

          Sincerely,

          Kay

  • Wendy

    Kay,
    i am going to ssi on monday morning someone took her phone and text me saying that she as Mrs Mccormick form ssi and that if i didnt give her money to her tonight that i would be in trouble i mean my daughter told us that she was spending the night at a friends house for the weekend and she never came home i tried texting her and even calling her and i got no response form her at all for months we had no idea where she was or anything and now she is trying to say that we have kept her money from her. thank you so much for your information in this i will be going to ssi on monday morning and speaking to someone about this.

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Wendy,

      Hopefully you still have your daughter’s benefits that were sent to you while she was gone because you are likely going to have to return the money to the Social Security Administration(SSA) because she was not in your care. The money will be reissued to her or the person currently responsible for her. I recommend not giving any money directly to your daughter and, if you do, get a receipt from her.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  • Wendy

    Hello i am currently my daughters payee she is 20 i have a situation she just up an moved out without notice with a complete stranger who is 37 yrs old and now my daughter wants me to just send her all of her ssi money to her even though i have no idea what she would be spending this money on what do i do here in this situation. mind you my daughter does not seem to be making very smart decisions

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Wendy,

      I recommend that you report to the Social Security Administration (SSA) that your daughter has moved and ask SSA to suspend your daughter’s benefits until a new payee can be found for her. If she wants to receive her own benefits, she needs a statement from her physician indicating that she is capable of managing her benefits to cover her basic expenses of housing, food, clothing, medical care, etc.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      Sincerely,

      Kay

  • Shannon

    If you are representative payee for an adult disabled child can you give them cash out of their ssi account to say go to the fair? Do they have to give you receipts back for the cash you gave them out of the ssi account?

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Shannon,

      Please see my reply to your other question. Assuming that all basic needs are met, it would be fine to give the person money to go the fair. You would not need to have receipts from what was spent at the fair, but you would want to itemize in your records “$20 to ___for the fair.” If you choose, you could have him or her sign a receipt for the cash for your records, but it is not required.

      Sincerely,

      Kay

      • Shannon

        Thank you so much.

        • Kay Derochie

          You are welcome, Shannon.

      • jhou

        I am my son’s representative payee,I was supposed to report my earnings to the social security administration but I have not done it for 8 month,they sent me a letter saying that I need to report my earnings that if I don’t my son’s suplemental check will stop.they sent me that letter in August so I said ok I will let it stop,I was working and I think my son does not need that check anymore.. I can take care of him… but the checks never stoped coming I haven’t cash those checks since August they keep coming and coming…is it gonna stop one day? Will I get in trouble for not cashing those checks?
        I have the checks in the envelopes with me in case I need to return them…they expire in one year anyway

        • Kay Derochie

          Dear Jhou,

          You have two choices. The first choice is to return the checks uncashed and request that the SSI be stopped. I suggest that you go to an office to do this in person. The second choice is to gather all your pay stubs and submit them to Social Security (keeping a copy), so that they can determine whether your son has been eligible for some SSI since you started working. If he has been eligible, you can then cash the checks and repay only the amount owed.This could be the better choice because if you stop working again, it might keep you from having to file a whole new claim in the future.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  • Leygo

    I was a representative payee for my daughter who is a minor. But my husband and I decided to cancel ssi payments cause we feel like we do n

    • Kay Derochie

      Dear Leygo,

      Your comment was incomplete. If you have a question, please resubmit your comment and question.

      Thank you,

      Kay

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