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How does the Social Security Administration decide how much SSI to pay me when I get an SSI approval?

By   /  March 3, 2016  /  652 Comments

Learn how SSI benefits are calculated after an SSI approval and what kinds of income are countable when determining your SSI payment amount.

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When SSI Benefits Start

After an SSI approval, benefits will be paid for the first full calendar month after you apply or after you become eligible for SSI, whichever is later.

The SSI Payment Formula

The Social Security Administration, known as SSA, figures your federal SSI benefit by deducting your countable unearned income and your countable earned income from the maximum Federal Benefit Amount of $733 for individuals and $1,100 for a couple. The remainder is your Federal Amount Payable. Some examples will follow later in this article.

State Supplements

Some states pay a supplementary benefit to individuals who qualify for SSI or do not qualify only because of income or resources that are above the federal limits but below the state’s limits. Some states administer their own supplements and require application or contact with the state. Other states turn the administration of their state supplement over to the Social Security Administration. If your state has a supplement that you could qualify for and the state handles its own administration, your Social Security office will direct you to the appropriate agency to make application. For a list of states with state supplements, see “Index of States That Supplement Payment When You Apply for SSI Benefits.”

When Income is Counted for SSI

After you get an SSI approval, your ongoing financial eligibility for SSI is decided on a month-by-month basis. This means you can be eligible in one month, not in the next, and then eligible again in the following month.

During your first three months of eligibility, your SSI benefit is calculated, non-recurring income is counted only in the month that it is received. After that, unless eligibility is interrupted, your payment will be based on income you received two months before. For example, if you became eligible in March 2016, beginning in June (the fourth month of eligibility), your income two months before, April’s income, would determine June’s payment; May’s income would determine your July payment, and so on. From this example, we can see how important it is to report changes by the tenth of the month after the change. Reporting on time minimizes underpayments and overpayments, which you might have to repay.

If eligibility is interrupted, the first three months that you are again eligible are treated like a new claim for purposes of calculation. This calculation convention is also used when an adult SSI recipient has a change in marital status or the parents of a child receiving SSI have a change in marital status and when the SSI-eligible child leaves a parent’s home.

For a discussion of which types of income are countable and which are not, please see our articles “I Want to Work. Can You Tell Me How to Get SSI While Working?” and “When I Complete My SSI Application Form, It Asks Me to Declare My Income. Does All My Income Affect My SSI?

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  • Published: 7 months ago on March 3, 2016
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  • Last Modified: March 4, 2016 @ 4:28 pm
  • Filed Under: SSI

652 Comments

  1. Patrice Lewis says:

    My 25 year old son receives SSi and Ma State Supplement program benefits of $544 and $52.25. He also works part time earning approx $80/week gross pay. I received a notice that SSP was reviewing his eligibility. He currently lives at home with my husband and I and his brother who is in college. I receive SSDI and am disabled. While filling out the review form there is a question about average total monthly household expenses and amount he contributes to the household. Is there a maximum amount can contribute? we don’t necessarily ask for room and board but do apply some of his SSI income towards our monthly expenses. I am unsure how to answer this question

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Patrice,

      There is no maximum contribution to shelter and food expenses. Just list the expenses including food if you share food and the amount of his SSI benefit and earnings that are used toward those expenses. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  2. Ashley says:

    Hello, I am wondering how my son’s SSI payment will be affected if I am approved for my SSDI in a month at my ALJ hearing. If I receive SSDI will he lose his SSI? he is 3 years old and currently receives $728.00/ month.
    Thank you~

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Ashley,

      I have insufficient information to answer your question. Whether or not your child will continue to be eligible will depend on how high your benefit is and whether or not he is eligible for Social Security dependent benefits on your earnings record and, if so, how much his dependents benefit is.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  3. Theresa L Riley says:

    Hi my name is Theresa and I live in portsmouth VA. I just got my letter for my ssi interview. I live with my son who is 20 and works. I’m not able to work due to my medical issues. I have food stamps some I can provide my own food but since I can’t work I been having to borrow money to help pay rent. We are living in a hotel and have been since Oct 2014. What do I need to do or bring with me to receive the maximum benefits. What happens if I don’t have any proof of the money I have borrowed? Any help you can give me I would appreciate. Thank you for your time.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Theresa,

      For the loans you mention to be treated as loans and not counted as income, you have to have a loan agreement with the person or persons you are borrowing from that says how much was lent, when it was lent, and what the plan is to repay it. If the loans are counted as income and was given to you for you to pay the rent, all but $20 of it will count as income to reduce your benefit from the maximum. If the people your borrowed from paid the hotel rent directly, the maximum your SSI will be reduced is $244.33.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Keshia says:

      If im approved $500 for disability and i do not qualify for the ssi part but have 3 kids would they get a check if so how much

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Keshia,

        If your family maximum benefit (FMB) is more than your own benefit, the difference between the two is potentially payable as dependent benefits. With your relatively small Social Security benefit, your children’s benefit, if any, would likely be a less than a hundred dollars for all three children. Try calling Social Security at 800-772-1213 to learn the amount of your FMB.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  4. Liz says:

    Hi Kay! Thanks for your previous advice on another page regarding my 10 now 11 month old daughter disability claim. I just did the appointment for interview with SSA today to complete her application. My question how to receive the max FBR opon her approval. The rep at SSA said its based in housing, income and resources. The home I live in I rent from my mom. Only my daughter, her father and I live here and he is not working for past 6 months as I am disabled and receive SSI and my baby had needed a lot of help. So he has no income. She did verify my rent I pay is $625 per month and also asked how much she would charge if I was not her daughter, and that amount was $1850-2250. I mentioned to her I’d like to contribute more with the rent to my mom as well as providing for my daughter special needs, as she will be the one to handle that upon her approval. Thanks!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Liz,

      The difference between $1,850 and $625 is $1095. This means that you, your daughter, and your child’s father are receiving $1,095 in-kind income in the form of subsidized housing. One-third of that amount or $365 is income to your daughter. $20 of the amount is excluded and $345 is counted. $345 is more than the maximum one-third reduction for this type of in-kind support and maintenance, so a reduction of $244.33 will be subtracted from the maximum Federal Benefit Rate (FBR) of $733 and $488.67 will be payable. The only way for the your child to receive more is for the child to pay $365 with her own funds for her own housing or for you and her father to pay market rate $1,850 to your mother. Also, the child and/or you two parents would also have to pay the utilities (not counting phone or cable) so that no one outside the family unit is paying for them.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Liz says:

        Thanks Kay!

        A follow up question. As this equation for my daughter to pay $365 toward the rent+ ulrilites paid by me & her father or herself (approx 250 per month in utilities) leaves little remainder for other needs. As long as the rent payment you stated is satisfied and utilities paid by no one out side home, it acceptable that my mother or may pay for other for other things, not food or utility, such as diapers, clothing, household products or services related to her condition not covered by Medicaid? Also does it make a difference if these things are paid by her on a recurring basis? If this is not acceptable to be subsidized by my mother, would it make a difference if funds came from a different family member, such as an Aunt who helps us frequently, as she is not the owner of the home?

        If you could kindly clarify & check my numbers, is the $365 she’d need to pay toward rent from her income in addition to the $625 I pay from my benefit for a total of $990 toward the market price of $1850 correct or rather my full benefit of $733 for a total of $1098 (+ ultilties approx $250 to be paid by us in home) ? I’m not sure of the formula used to calculate this.

        The disability determination rep indicated her case is an expedited priority case, and that she’ll likely be approved soon, as she’s submitting her medical records to SSA doctor for approval this week.
        Should I give a call to the SSA representative at our local office handling this part of her case as soon as my mom and I arrange a new rent agreement, or will the benefit amount first check first few be predetermined based on rent payment at time of application?

        Thanks so much for offering this very useful advice at no cost, BTW! I appreciate it greatly. Take care!

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Liz,

          Anyone can pay for non-shelter and non-food items for your family and it will not affect either your Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or your daughter’s as long as the person pays for the goods or services directly to the store or service provider and does not give you the money to buy these things.

          The amount you say that you receive, $733, usually indicates Supplemental Security Income (SSI). If you are receiving the maximum SSI, it appears Social Security is considering that you are paying rent for yourself and not for your child or your husband; otherwise your benefit would be reduced.

          If they continue with that determination and your and your daughter pays one-third of the $1,850 and one third of the utilities for a total of $700 each, both you and she will be paying your share and the subsidy will all be to your husband. The in-kind shelter your husband receives is not deemable to you or your daughter.

          SSI benefit amounts are calculated monthly, so each month your daughter is eligible will be calculated separately. She will not be able to pay rent until she has income so her back pay will be reduced. When she gets her back pay, assuming it is less than six months of benefits and doesn’t have to be deposited to a dedicated account, you can use that back pay to pay her share. At that time you can report she is paying her share of the FMV and utilities and her benefit should be increased two months later.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

          • Liz says:

            Excellent! Thanks Kay that’s exactly what I needed to know. when my SSI was approved they did not ask my mom how much she’d charge if I were not her daughter, simply verified that the rent charged was $625 per month. So it’s helpful you clarified the part it may be determined 1/3 per person. This way I can help my mom with rent and intern she can help fund services and products for my daughter, paid directly to providers.
            The disability determination rep indicated my daughter is a priority case and will be expedited, currently is being reviewed by SSA DR for approval, I applied in July, without an attorney so should be under 6 months & this part shouldn’t be a concern.THANKS!

          • Kay Derochie says:

            You are welcome,Liz.

  5. rose vieira says:

    hi my name is rose i recently file for ssi but have been disabled since 2012 and hav been denied disabilty 3 time i have an appoinment on the 18 of august the said i need to bring my bank info is this a good thing and hpow much back pay would i get if you could plz tell my i would greatly apprecat it thank you

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rose,

      The request for bank information is an indication that you have been approved. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is paid in amounts ranging from $1 to $733 a month based on the amount of other income including free shelter or food you have received while your claim pended. Accordingly, I cannot estimate the amount of back pay you might receive.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  6. Michelle Bernat says:

    Hello, I am wondering…I will not be eligible in some months of the year for SSI due to my husband’s income….in those months I will not get Medicaid. Can I elect to stay on my husband’s health insurance from his employer year-round to avoid this lapse in coverage? In the months I qualify for SSI, would Medicaid then be considered a ‘second payer’ toward my medical bills…example:copays for lab tests, Dr. visit copays, Rx copays, the like? I cannot go without having any health insurance. Thankyou….

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Michelle,

      You can choose to be on your husband’s health insurance. Check with the Medicaid administrative office that handles Medicaid claims to find out whether they will act as second payer or whether you will simply lose Medicaid because you have other insurance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  7. Donna says:

    My boyfriend started getting SSI in March due to a disability. (not disability insurance). During the phone interview they had said he would get $488 for March and April because they were backlogged and it would go up in May due to $488 a month is not fair market for the expenses of the household. There was never an increase and I am trying to find out why or what I have to do for him to get that increase. His checks come to me in my name with his on it. I am the only person allowed to make calls to SSI in his behalf.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Donna,

      For your boyfriend to receive the maximum SSI of $733, he has to pay for his own shelter and food with this own income or with food stamps and/or a government housing subsidy. He can do this either as renter paying fair market value (FMV) or as a member of a household paying his share. When he starts to do this, his SSI will increase two months later because changes in income, either up or down, change SSI benefit amount two months later.

      Fair market value for food would reasonably be the maximum food stamp grant for one person, which is $194.00. FMV for room is the amount such rooms are renting for in your geographic area. Social Security law does not specify an amount required to be fair market value because the economy is different in every location. You can figure out a fair market rental rate by looking at ads for room rentals in your area or by choosing your state and county on the federal HUD website at https://www.huduser.gov/portal/datasets/fmr/fmr_il_history/select_Geography.odn. It will not list rooms, but it will list studio or efficiency (one-room) apartments. A room in a house would probably be about half of that amount.

      Share is the total shelter (and food if food is shared) costs divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

      When he starts to receive benefits and gets his back pay check, his benefit has the potential of going up. If he either pays fair market value (FMV) for room and buys his own food or pays fair market value for room and board or pays his share of shelter and food, his SSI can increase to
      If your boyfriend has back pay he could use that to pay FMV or his share if he doesn’t have enough monthly income. Alternatively, he could save up his SSI until he has enough saved to cover his share or FMV for two months. If he does this, you should save his money in a bank account to prove he had the money available to cover the expenses.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  8. Sarah says:

    Hello,
    My daughter was born at 28 weeks weighing 2lbs and 7.5 oz. Since her birth I have been unable to work and am not yet sure when I will be returning (it depends on what issues she comes home with), but my husband brings in roughly $1600 a month from his job. The NICU social worker has filed for supplemental security income on our behalf and I’m wondering how much we will qualify for. Thanks!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Sarah,

      While your child is in the NICU, her SSI benefit will be $30. To provide an estimate of her benefit when she comes home, I need your husband’s monthly gross income, rather than his take-home.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  9. Brandon says:

    I applied March 1st, 2016 for SSI. I was called today for financial info and was told my money would be deposited into my account by Friday. My mother and I agreed that I would pay her back for the months that I lived with her (Oct 2015). But they said they wouldn’t take that so my payment would be at 488.67

    When SSI calculated my payment they started with April 1st 2016. I thought they started counting from March 1st when I applied… Am I missing something or are they correct?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Brandon,

      My understanding is that if you applied for SSI on the first of the month, that month is payable. In other words, I would expect March to be paid. If you had a written loan agreement with your mother, you can appeal the amount of your payment. Otherwise, you can get an increase going forward if you use your back pay to start paying fair market value (FMV) for your room or room and board or your share of shelter expenses and, if you share food, your share of food. You will need enough SSI benefits to pay your shelter and food for two months because the benefit will go up until two months after you start covering your own shelter and food. (You are considered to be buying your own food if you are doing so with food stamps.)

      Fair market value for food would reasonably be the maximum food stamp grant for one person, which is $194.00. FMV for room is the amount such rooms are renting for in your geographic area. Social Security law does not specify an amount required to be paying fair market value for room because the economy is different in every location. You can figure out a fair market rental rate by looking at ads for room rentals in your area or by choosing state and county on the federal HUD website at https://www.huduser.gov/portal/datasets/fmr/fmr_il_history/select_Geography.odn. It will not list rooms, but it will list studio or efficiency (one-room) apartments. A room in a house would probably be about half of that amount. (Sometimes it is hard to prove a business rental relationship with an adult child because it is likely the parent would evict.)

      Share is the total shelter and food, if food is shared, costs divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Misty says:

      Hi there!
      My mom and brother moved in together in a two bedroom apt. The rent is $550.00 a month and utilities are about $100.00 per month. so the both split the rent and utilities in half. Today I got a letter stating that her income will be $488.00 instead of $733.00 per. Somewhere on the letter I see a income of less $266.00.I’m not sure why.

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Misty,

        Your mother’s SSI was reduced because it was determined that she was receiving in-kind (non-cash) income from your brother with a value of at least $266.34. She should appeal the decision on the grounds she is paying her share. She needs to present a statement from your brother confirming that they have splitted the rent and utilities equally and buy food separately (or she pays her half if they share food) ever since they started to live together, the rental agreement with the landlord that shows the total rent, and the utility bills.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

  10. Greg says:

    Hi Kay,

    Thanks for taking the time to look and hopefully answer my questions…

    My son who is 18 and who is going into his senior year of high school, just got approved for SSI based on his mental impairment. We live in PA and my son lives with us. (myself, wife and daughter).

    Our Social Security admin has advised us that we need to come up with an agreement between our son and us (wife and myself) for expenses….and send that to him prior to him getting any money.

    He lives in our basement, which is finished with a bedroom and living room and full bathroom….

    So, instead of charging him 1/4 of the full mortgage (we have a 16 year old daughter that lives with us also) we thought it would be cheaper on him if we charged him for just room rent instead of 1/4 of a $1900.00 mortgage, which would be $475.00….and then we would need to charge him for 1/4 of the utilities, including, trash and sewer, etc…what would be cheaper?

    For food what would we charge him? Would it be what someone who would get food stamps for a month? If so, what would that be?

    I guess what I’m trying to come to is, if he’ll be getting $733.00, which hasn’t been determined yet (I guess that’s why our Social Security admin wants this agreement, so he can get the full $733.00), do we need to go over that ($733.00) or stay under that in the agreement? I’m thinking we will need to stay under that in the agreement because he doesn’t work, only goes to high school, and if we’re over it ($733.00) I’m sure our Social Security admin will wonder where he’s going to get the extra money from if we’re over in the agreement.

    Thanks,
    Greg

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Greg,

      Right now, your son has no income so he is not paying for shelter and food. This means that his back benefits will be calculated with a one-third reduction at $488.67 because it appears his share of shelter expenses and food come to more than $266.34. To receive the maximum benefit in the future, he would would need to have sufficient income to pay either fair market value (FMV) for room and board or his share of shelter and food. If the cost is higher than what his SSI income will be, he could get a partial raise if he can pay close enough to FMV or his share that the subsidy from you is less than $266.34.

      You are correct that the maximum food stamp grant for one person, which is now $192, would reasonably be FMV. FMV for room is the amount such rooms are renting for in your geographic area. Social Security law does not specify an amount required to be paying fair market value for room because the economy is different in every location. You can figure out a fair market rental rate by looking at ads for room rentals (in this case a suite of rooms) in your area or by choosing your state and county on the federal HUD website at https://www.huduser.gov/portal/datasets/fmr/fmr_il_history/select_Geography.odn. The site will not list rooms, but it will list studio or efficiency (one-room, plus bath) apartments. Two rooms and a private bath in a house would probably be about two-thirds of that amount.

      As you noted, you can calculate his share of shelter expenses and add $192 for food to figure what his sharing cost would be. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Greg says:

        Hi Kay,

        When you state “To receive the maximum benefit in the future, he would would need to have sufficient income to pay either fair market value (FMV) for room and board or his share of shelter and food. If the cost is higher than what his SSI income will be, he could get a partial raise if he can pay close enough to FMV or his share that the subsidy from you is less than $266.34.”

        Would ‘sufficient income’ mean getting the full $733.00 from his SSI benefits?

        The agreement we came up with was 1/4 of the mortgage, which is $1900.00 ,plus 1/4 utilities and 1/4 food…all came to about $643 and change…..

        So, with that agreement in place and we sent it into his social security admin, will he now receive the full $733.00?

        Thanks
        Greg

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Greg,

          Typically, the increase is not effectuated until the share is actually paid, and it has to be paid for two months before the increase because a change in income–whether an increase or a decrease–takes effect two months later. This policy reduces underpayments and overpayments. That is why I suggested using part of your son’s back pay initially to pay the share until the increase takes effect two months later.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

      • Lisa says:

        My autistic son is in the same situation. We just applied at the local Social Security office (in CA )for SSI for him, a month before he turns 18. How does the SS office know whether he will be living along or with family? They have our address, but our hope is that he will soon be able to get an apartment with a buddy (there is section 8 housing a few miles away but it has a 2 year waiting list). If he gets less than $733, do we need to notify SS that we are charging him rent & utilities, or does that matter…they will give him what they want? No one has ever asked us if we are charging him or if he plans to live on his own.

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Lisa,

          If your son is approved for SSI disability as an adult, he needs to report if he moves and lives with a friend. Knowingly not reporting and having an overpayment occur because of the new living arrangements opens you or him if he is his own payee to fraud charges. If he and his friend split shelter costs and, if they share food, food costs, he will not have a reduction for living with a friend.

          While he is in your home, your adult son’s benefit will be determined based on whether or not he pays either fair market value (FMV) for room or room and board or his share of shelter and food expenses. If initially, he is unable to do that because he has not income, his benefit will be reduced by $244.67. Once he starts to pay FMV or his share, his benefits will go up two months later. If his monthly benefit is not enough for him to pay FMV or his share, he can use any back benefits that are paid or save up until he can.

          Fair market value for food would reasonably be the maximum food stamp grant for one person, which is $192.00. FMV for room is the amount such rooms are renting for in your geographic area. Social Security law does not specify an amount required to be paying fair market value for room because the economy is different in every location. You can figure out a fair market rental rate by looking at ads for room rentals in your area or by choosing state and county on the federal HUD website at https://www.huduser.gov/portal/datasets/fmr/fmr_il_history/select_Geography.odn. It will not list rooms, but it will list studio or efficiency (one-room) apartments. A room in a house would probably be about half of that amount.

          Share is the total expenses divided by the number of people in the household. Shelter expenses are shelter utilities (power, heat, water/sewer, and garbage) and rent or mortgage, property tax and, if required by the lender, property insurance.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  11. rose says:

    dear kay wheni first went in to file they asked me if i have been disabled since 2012 cuz thats what they had on record is it posssable to get the back pay from then cuz thats when i orgianllly filed but never heard back can i plz get some in on this

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Rose,

      When a prior claim is denied and not appealed, that claim is closed. Even if your current claim establishes a disability onset date in 2012, your Social Security back pay will be limited to twelve months before the month of your current application.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  12. Michelle Bernat says:

    Hello Kay, I turned in my paystubs and financial info. after being approved for SSI…do you know how long it takes to receive the backpay and also monthly amounts? It’s been almost 2 weeks since turning that in, thankyou!

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Michelle,

      If you haven’t received your first monthly Supplemental Security Income (SSI) within a month of turning in the documents, try following up at the local office. The first installment of back pay is usually paid within a month after the monthly benefits start. (SSI back pay over $2,199 is paid in up to three installments six months apart with the first two not exceeding $2,199 each.)

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  13. Pearl says:

    My son was doagnosed with seizures in 2012 i had apply online and also applied at main office he was denied the first time. I reapploed again he was approved he had brain surgery which thwy took the right side of the brain cause it was damaged. Now he is 1p years old no seizures he is disabled from the left side cant move his left arm he walks again limps here nd there when he walks. But my question is his grandmother said that he should be getting a back pay since they denied him the first time but he didnt get no back pay. I would like to call the ssi office but i do t want them to mess up his ssi. My questin is should ssi give him back pay? Or should i just let it go the firat time they were givi g him $500 and i guess they made a mistake and started giving him $733. But his grandmother told me i need to talk to someonw bout a back pay i dont what to do i should or shouldnt?

    • Pearl says:

      10 years old sorry typing so fast

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Pearl,

      If your son was approved on a second application and not on an appeal of the first denial, no back pay is due any farther back than the month after the second application–or if you applied on the first of the month, back to the month of the second application.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

    • Tonya says:

      I just had my income interview with social security for ssi payments. How much do they count of child support payments and do they consider the children’s needs rent, and utilities

      • Kay Derochie says:

        Dear Tonya,

        All but $20 of the disabled child’s income will be used to reduce the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit from the potential maximum federal payment of $733. Expenses do not govern payment amount. Benefits are calculated based on income including in-kind (non-cash) support and maintenance in the form of shelter or food provided by anyone other than the child’s parent(s) living in the household.

        Sincerely,
        Kay

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Tonya,

          Here’s a correction of the information I provided on September 6. Only two-thirds of child support paid for a disabled child is counted; and it the child has no other income, the $20 general exclusion applies as well.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  14. Andre says:

    Kay,

    If you were re-approved for SSI benefits but you have exceeded over the resource limit..I read from another forum that your benefits will be reinstated if you get it below the minimum.

    Say if I had a bill that I needed to pay and it exceeded over what SSI offers for a single person. This particular bill needed to be paid in full and over the past few months or so..and you saved up money to pay that bill off and can prove to Social Security of how much that bill was for and you have the paid receipt. How would they take that into account?

    Specially if you just did a renewal but in the paperwork is states, “How we figured your ineligibility for the month of plus year.” What exactly does that mean..and again as long as you get the money back down below $2,000 will you still be able to retain your income before the next month?

    Thank you.

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Andre,

      If you are financially ineligible for more than twelve months, your claim is closed and you have to file a new claim including getting a current medical review and approval.

      As far as I know, the reason why you saved the money would not keep the money from being counted as a resource; but if you can prove that you paid the bill and dropped below the resource limit before the claim terminated, the documents you reference would be proof.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

  15. DT says:

    What happens if you go over the limit of social security?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear DT,

      If you are receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and start to have income or resource above the limits, your benefits will be stopped. If you have been paid incorrectly because you did not report on time or just because of the timing of receiving income, you will be overpaid and asked to repay. If you become eligible again within twelve months, you can request resumption of benefits without filing a new claim.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Tania says:

        Hi I applied for ssi for my daughter August 2014 got approved August 2016 they said her payments will be 488 and her back money would only be 4,386 which is wayyy off my calculations….and i took them a letter in explaining l have to now pay rent and they told me her payments will increase $733.. but if I owe some one money for rent back since when I applied for ssi for her will they then calculate 733×25months or will they just calculate that 488×25months….? And where did they only calculate 4,386 for back pay I feel like my calculations is off or there’s are

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Tania,

          If you had a written repayment agreement for the free rent to show that you have been incurring a debt, your child’s SSI for past months may be recalculated at the higher rate. The statement has to say how much of a debt you were incurring each month, that is, how much rent you were supposed to pay, when you started to incur the monthly debt, and also how the debt was to be repaid. You can either try to submit a loan statement now or wait for a decision and appeal with the statement.

          To determine the correct number of months of back pay, look at the medical approval. It is possible that the date of disability onset was determined to be later than the date you applied. If the established disability onset goes back to the application date, benefits would begin to accrue the month after application unless you applied on the first of the month in which case benefits would start with the month of application. Next consider whether in any months you or your child had income other than the free rent. If so, that income could be further reducing benefits. Until you can establish a bona fide loan for the rent, the monthly benefit would be $488 minus any countable income.

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  16. mark finch says:

    Hi,
    I am on ssi and i have a child who just turned 18 years old. I use to get letters from SS that said we did not count $367 of your spouses income for each month as a living allowance for ineligible children. But now i longer get that as i said my daughter is over 18 now so my question is does it end? What if child is in college does it continue till child is 22 s long as full time in college? I called SS they said no it ends when child turns 18 regardless college or not. Yet a different person at SS said yes. Please help i am so confused thank you

  17. Kimberly Turner says:

    There are 4 children in our household two adults one of my children is eligible for SSI and has been approved. His father has earned wages of a gross amount on average of $2,110.40 is there any way to determine the amount of SSI my son will receive. Who makes 13.19 an hour and works an average of 80 hours a week sometimes he gets overtime but not often. They told me I had to turn in my fiance’s wages every month to determine the amount my son will receive every month but based on what his father makes do you you have the ability to calculate what my son will receive

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Kimberly,

      Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits are calculated based on income received within a month, not on an average. In months your child’s father has no overtime and two paychecks, your son’s benefits would be $733. In months that he receives three paychecks and no overtime, the SSI benefit will be about $487.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

      • Dominique says:

        I have a quick question i recently applied for ssi for my three year old son who has autism . He’s only receving$ 224.41a month until they figure out if he’s disable . My total monthly income is only $704.00 . Im confused will this be his payment from here out or will it go up when he is deemed disabled ??? Please help

        • Kay Derochie says:

          Dear Dominque,

          If your $703 income is the only parental income in the household and no one is providing your child with free food (other than food stamps) or housing, your child should be eligible for $733 a month. If he is getting free shelter, his benefit could be as low as $488.67 until he starts or you start to pay for his shelter (and food if free food is involved).

          Sincerely,
          Kay

  18. Jackie says:

    I recieved a letter from ssa saying they made a favorable medical decision on my ssi claim and to come in with a friend or family member to be my represenitive payee does this mean I am approved ?

  19. Tylor west says:

    My son is on SSI and I make about 2000 a month I have 1 other child not on SSI in the home how much should my SSI payments be?

    • Kay Derochie says:

      Dear Taylor,

      If you are the only parent or stepparent in the household and your children do not have income and your $2.000 earnings are gross wages, I calculate that your child is eligible for $702 per month.

      Sincerely,
      Kay

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